Religious leaders: Rainforest protection a ‘moral imperative’

first_imgThe three-day event, held in Oslo, Norway, includes discussions between NGOs, government agencies, universities, indigenous groups and major religions.The event marks the launch of the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative, which seeks to build on the moral case for rainforest protection with tangible metrics and goals.Indigenous and religious leaders from 21 countries attended the event, organized by the UN Development Programme, Rainforest Foundation Norway and Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative. Religious leaders from around the world are meeting for the first time with conservationists and scientists in Norway this week to develop the ethical case for protecting tropical forests.“There is a dimension to this fight that will require a global, tectonic shift in values,” said Vidar Helgesen, Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment, in a statement. “It is not the realm of policy, commerce or science, but of spirit, faith and moral conviction.”King Harald V of Norway with an indigenous group in Brazil. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation NorwayThe event marks the launch of the Interfaith Rainforest Initiative. From June 19 through 21, heads of various religions, including Judaism, Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism, are sitting down with government officials, indigenous leaders, and NGO representatives to hammer out a roadmap for rainforest conservation at the Nobel Peace Center. The aim is to address the massive loss of forest happening every year, equivalent to an area the size of Austria according to the organizers of the conference, by leveraging the growing sentiment in many of the world’s spiritual and religious communities that we all have an obligation to protect these areas.“The world’s religions, each in its own unique way, ground a moral call to action to protect tropical rainforests,” said William F. Vendley, the secretary general of Religions for Peace, in the press release. “Through multi-religious partnership, the wisdom of each religious tradition can be a resource to help us to cultivate the values and virtues essential for harmonious interactions with each other and our common home, [Earth].”Worldwide, rainforests play a vital role in the daily lives of 1.6 billion people, say the lead organizations, laying out a clear need from a social justice standpoint to ensure that those forests will still be standing in the future.“The world’s religious and faith communities have a unique capacity to raise awareness and understanding of our responsibility to protect these vital ecosystems,” said Achim Steiner, administrator of the UN Development Programme (UNDP), in the statement, “and thus an important voice in a growing coalition of governments, companies, indigenous peoples’ groups and NGOs that have committed to ending deforestation by 2030.”UNDP, along with Rainforest Foundation Norway and Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative, organized the discussion, to be held through June 21. Norway has made a big push to back efforts such as reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries – or REDD+ – with $3 billion in financing over the past 10 years.The indigenous community of Kwamala in Suriname. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerMany experts have noted a rise in the global awareness of environmental issues recently, as leaders such as Pope Francis, the head of the Roman Catholic Church, have supported a faith-based role in protecting the environment. The pope’s 2015 encyclical Laudato Si codified a spiritual argument for addressing climate change because of its impact on the world’s poor. Other leaders point out that their faiths also call for stewardship of the Earth.“Islam teaches the principle of unity of existence that implies a triangle of harmony among God, Man and Nature,” said Din Syamsuddin, chairman of the Indonesia-based Center for Dialogue and Cooperation Among Civilizations, in the statement. “Conserving rain forest is indeed a part of keeping that balance for the wellbeing of both Nature and Mankind.”Rabbi David Rosen, who is the International Director of Interreligious Affairs of the American Jewish Committee, pointed to the Garden of Eden in Genesis in Judaism’s Bible, which is also the first book of the Christianity’s Old Testament.“To fail to ensure the health and strength of the forests is not only to imperil humanity’s future,” Rosen said. “It is to fail the Divine charge to humanity to protect the Garden of our world.”But participants in Oslo also pointed out that a prominent place for nature in peoples’ faiths is nothing new, and that global leaders would do well to support the long-standing efforts of forest communities to safeguard their environment.King Harald V of Norway in Brazil. Norway hosted the interfaith summit on deforestation. Photo courtesy of Rainforest Foundation Norway“Tropical rainforests occupy a sacred place in many faiths, religions and spiritual traditions,” said Mary Evelyn Tucker, who directs the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale University. “Indeed, spiritual reverence for nature and all life can be found across the world’s religions, including among Indigenous Peoples and other residents of the world’s tropical rainforests.”Leaders representing indigenous communities from the forests of Southeast Asia, the Amazon and Africa were in attendance. Several experts recognized their unique contribution to forest health, the knowledge that they can contribute going forward and their sometimes-precarious position as frontline defenders of the forest.“We would like to direct this emerging interfaith movement to focus on the besieged indigenous communities that have protected these forests for thousands of years,” said Lars Løvold, the director of Rainforest Foundation Norway, in the statement. “The systematic destruction of tropical forests is often accompanied by land grabs and even outright murder. We need to secure the rights of forest peoples, and listen to their voices in national and international policy debates.”Attendees said that they hoped that the talks in Oslo will spur last cooperation with the goal of ending deforestation, protecting biodiversity and ensuring that forests are there to provide for both the basic needs of local people and the climate-change-mitigating force on which all of us depend. Plans are in progress for having another interfaith summit in Brazil in 2018.“The world’s rainforests are a stunning example of the life-sustaining beauty of the planet; they are spectacular, vital to life, and at grave risk,” said Reverend Fletcher Harper, the executive director of the interreligious coalition GreenFaith. “This meeting represents a tremendously important first step forward for faith communities, who must join First Peoples and commit to rainforests’ health and restoration.”Banner image of Ticana children in Colombia by Rhett A. Butler.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change Politics, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forest People, Forests, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Saving Rainforests, Social Justice, Sustainable Development, Tropical Forests, United Nations last_img read more

Sixth mass extinction ‘tsunami’ coming, but preventable

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Rainforest, Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Conservation, Deforestation, Degraded Lands, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecosystem Services, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extinction And Climate Change, Extinction Debt, Forest Carbon, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Fragmentation, Logging, Mammals, Parks, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Reforestation, Saving Rainforests, Saving Species From Extinction, Sixth Mass Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Biologist Thomas Lovejoy writes in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that we can stop the current spate of biodiversity and species loss that the Earth is experiencing.Pointing to a recent study showing that many animals are declining in numbers in addition to those facing the imminent risk of extinction, Lovejoy argues that we need to address all of the impacts that humans have on ecosystems.He calls for the restoration of degraded forests and wetlands — activities in which everyone can participate — to facilitate the movement of wildlife between habitats and bring back the services that ecosystems provide. Planet Earth is barreling through its sixth mass extinction right now, and there’s little doubt among scientists that we humans are responsible. Despite the challenges we face, the encouraging twist this time is that we can do something about it, says biologist Thomas Lovejoy.“In contrast to any of the other mass extinctions, this is one where one species is responsible and is completely capable of being aware of it and actually stopping it,” he said in an interview. A professor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, and the “godfather of biological diversity,” Lovejoy recently crafted an essay for the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) in which he highlighted the importance of taking into account all of the changes we’ve foisted on the planet to address this unprecedented loss of species.A tree frog (Hyla sp.) in the Peruvian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay“We’re hardwired by evolution to react to immediate things,” Lovejoy said, “but we also have a fair amount of mental capability that allows us to actually look ahead and project what’s going on.”What is going on, according to recent research that also appeared in PNAS by another team of scientists, is that the numbers of one-third of the 27,600 vertebrate species that the team looked at are falling, including many that we don’t consider close to being wiped out. To be sure, Earth is midstream in an extinction blitz, in which we’ve been losing about two species a year for the past century — up to 100 times faster than “normal” extinction rates. But the authors of the study, published on July 10, write that outright loss of these animals has been masking the downward slide of a great many more.“What they highlighted so well is that extinction is not just an event,” Lovejoy said. “It’s a process.”So while it is critical to tackle immediate threats such as poaching and habitat loss by protecting the areas where threatened animals live, we also must find ways to confront the furtive knock-on effects “that could otherwise undercut locally focused efforts,” Lovejoy writes.Numbers of the African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) have declined by 30 percent in the past seven years. Photo by John C. CannonAs an example, he points to the dynamics of water in the Amazon rainforest, which Lovejoy knows well after more than five decades of fieldwork there. More than 50 percent of the world’s largest rainforest is currently protected in some way, but he writes that even that “impressive” figure may not be enough to stem the loss of species.As humans cut down other parts of forest, often for the farms and ranches that supply our food, it could disrupt the cycle in which rain falls in the forest and then flows back into the atmosphere through evaporation and the transpiration of resident plants. The protected habitat that’s home to many of the Amazon’s animals might still stand. But at some point — Lovejoy figures when we’ve lost more than 20 percent of the rainforest to deforestation — that cycle could rupture, leading to a cascade of degradation, even to areas of safeguarded forest that are part of the larger system.“If we’re going to take the extinction threat seriously, we have to look at all these vectors and recognize that, in the end, it’s not just about going off and saving something before the last one is snuffed out,” Lovejoy said. “It’s about addressing these drivers.”The authors of the PNAS study referred to the global loss of biodiversity as an “annihilation.” That’s not a term lead author Gerardo Ceballos and his colleagues toss around lightly.“As scientists, we have to be very careful not to be alarmist, saying things that are not supported by science,” said Ceballos, a biologist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. But they decided that the results of their analysis warranted such strong language.The leopard (Panthera pardus), pictured here in Tanzania, is a highly adaptable animal. Nevertheless, it’s less prevalent than it used to be and is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. Photo by John C. Cannon“It would be unethical not to say how bad things are according to our data,” he added. They also did a deep dive into previous research on 177 better-known vertebrates. The habitats of every single one had been cut by a minimum of 30 percent since the beginning of the 20th century. Forty percent of the animals experienced 80 percent or more habitat loss in that same time period.“I wish I was wrong” about their results, Ceballos said.In Lovejoy’s essay for PNAS, he said that the scale of such global problems demands equally ambitious solutions, such as the Half Earth Project “in which human ambition is embedded in nature.”Although such efforts might appear “impossibly dreamy,” Lovejoy said there are manageable ways to start.Climate change is another process that could undermine functioning ecosystems. However, if we began by restoring forests, wetlands, and other habitats that we’ve had a hand in degrading, Lovejoy thinks that we could sidestep as much as a 0.5-degree-Celsius (0.9-degree-Fahrenheit) increase in the global temperature because of the additional carbon these areas could then pull out of the atmosphere. The 2015 Paris agreement on climate change aims to keep the increase below 2 degrees C above what the average temperature was before the Industrial Revolution.“If we [restore these spots], we get a whole bunch of additional benefits,” Lovejoy said. “The ecosystems will be functioning properly again and providing all kinds of different services to us.”The range of the African lion (Panthera leo) is less than one-third the size that it once was. Photo by John C. CannonNot only will this restoration reinstall critical connections between wildlife habitats, but people stand to see benefits such as better water quality and cleaner air.“It also, interestingly enough, empowers the individual because everybody can plant a tree or help with a wetland restoration,” Lovejoy said. “Just like a victory garden in a war effort, everybody can make a tangible contribution and it no longer seems like this impossible, unsolvable problem.“I’m hoping that as this current young generation comes along that they’ll realize that there’s a glorious contribution to be made to the future of their descendants but also to humanity and life on Earth.”Banner image of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi) in Tanzania by John C. Cannon.CITATIONSCeballos, G., Ehrlich, P. R., & Dirzo, R. (2017). Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(30), E6089-E6096.Lovejoy, T. E. (2017). Extinction tsunami can be avoided. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201711074.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonlast_img read more

Two Indonesian soldiers found to be smuggling dozens of porcupines

first_imgBanner image: A Malayan porcupine at Khao Yai National Park, Thailand. Photo by Rushenb/Wikimedia Commons. Animal Rescue, Animals, Biodiversity, Environment, Environmental Crime, Illegal Trade, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Military, Wildilfe, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Rescues, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Basten Gokkon FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The Indonesian conservation agency caught a pair of army officers trying to smuggle dozens of porcupines across provincial borders in Sumatra.The animal’s stomach produces a stone used in traditional Chinese medicine.The soldiers were questioned by civilian authorities, and then turned over to the military. PADANG, Indonesia — Two soldiers were caught trying to smuggle dozens of Malayan porcupines (Hystrix brachyura) across provincial borders, the latest arrest of a military officer for wildlife trafficking.The porcupines are prized for the bezoar stones that form in their stomachs, a component in traditional Chinese medicine thought to cure a range of ailments, from dengue fever to cancer.The state conservation agency had received a tip about the soldiers’ contraband as the pair drove from West to North Sumatra. When confronted, the suspects tried to flee, but agency officials and police blocked their way.Cages full of Malayan porcupines are seen in the trunk of the soldiers’ car. Photo courtesy of the Pasaman conservation agency.The soldiers were turned over to the military police in Pasaman district, West Sumatra, for questioning. They were eventually sent back to North Sumatra, where they are stationed at an air base.“Our mission was only to thwart the porcupine smuggling,” said Edi Candra, head of the conservation agency’s office in Pasaman. “We leave the legal matters to their unit. The two suspects have already made a statement never to do it again.”The Wildlife Conservation Society, an international NGO, slammed their release as another example of impunity when it comes to influential figures who sell animals illegally.The Indonesian military has its own process for investigating soldiers charged with a crime. This consistently falls short of delivering justice to traffickers, said Irma Hermawati, coordinator of the NGO’s Wildlife Crime Unit.“If all they have to do is make a statement [never to do it again], there won’t be any deterrent effect,” she said.A cage full of Malayan porcupines confiscated from the soldiers. Photo courtesy of the Pasaman conservation agency.Last year, a military family in North Sumatra turned in a pet orangutan it had kept in a cage for so many years, its legs had atrophied to the point where the ape could no longer stand.Indonesian law provides a maximum penalty of five years imprisonment for anyone who transports, trades, keeps or kills a protected species such as the Malayan porcupine, whose population is decreasing due to habitat loss and hunting for food and medicinal purposes.The conservation agency confiscated 40 live Malayan porcupines from the soldiers, and freed the animals in the Rimbo Panti Wildlife Reserve. This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 20, 2017. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Massive protected area around ‘Atlantic Galapagos’ one step closer to becoming reality

first_imgAnimals, Conservation, Environment, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Protected Areas, Wildlife Bringing the protection of the “Atlantic Galapagos” one step closer to becoming a reality, the Governor of St. Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha, Philip Rushbrook, designated a large-sale Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the waters around Ascension Island last month.The MPA will cover the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Ascension Island, a UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic. That means that an area of more than 440,000 square kilometers or 170,000 square miles will be included in the Ascension Island MPA, making it one of the largest in the world.While legislation and a management plan won’t be finalized until long-term funding has been secured for the MPA, it has been proposed that commercial fishing and mineral extraction be prohibited altogether within the waters around Ascension Island, which has been described as a “miniature Galapagos Islands” because of its rich biodiversity. Bringing the protection of the “Atlantic Galapagos” one step closer to becoming a reality, the Governor of St. Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha, Philip Rushbrook, designated a large-sale Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the waters around Ascension Island last month.The MPA will cover the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Ascension Island, a UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic. That means that an area of more than 440,000 square kilometers or 170,000 square miles will be included in the Ascension Island MPA, making it one of the largest in the world.While legislation and a management plan won’t be finalized until long-term funding has been secured for the MPA, it has been proposed that commercial fishing and mineral extraction be prohibited altogether within the waters around Ascension Island, which has been described as a “miniature Galapagos Islands” because of its rich biodiversity. Ascension Island and its territorial waters provide important habitat for several key species of endemic fish, green turtles, land crabs, seabirds, sharks, and tuna, among other wildlife species. The island’s EEZ also includes extensive seamounts, underwater mountains that teem with life.The designation of the MPA was made at the recommendation of the Ascension Island Council, which said in a statement: “The designation of such a large-scale Marine Protected Area will ensure that the near pristine marine environment around Ascension Island will be protected for future generations. We now eagerly await appropriate funding from the UK Government to support the ongoing future management costs of the MPA.”Comfortless Cove on Ascension Island. Photo by Ben Tullis, licensed under CC BY 2.0.That funding seems all but assured, as UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, while attending the G7 Summit held last month, pledged £7 million to extend the Blue Belt initiative, which was launched in 2016 and has already led to the UK and its Overseas Territories establishing MPAs in more than half of British waters.Once the UK commits to funding the Ascension Island MPA, it will become the Atlantic Ocean’s largest fully protected marine reserve, according to Enric Sala, a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. Sala also leads NatGeo’s Pristine Seas team, which took part in a two-month scientific expedition in 2017 to explore the ecosystems surrounding Ascension Island.“Our team conducted 32 surveys of seabirds and flying fish, deployed 18 drop cams to document the sea life living in the deepest parts of the region’s ocean floor, mapped 277 square kilometers of seamounts, and found seven different species of shark — including the rarely spotted sixgill shark. Ascension is an oasis of abundance surrounded by an ocean of overexploitation,” Sala reported in a blog post for NatGeo.He added that the new MPA will be monitored via satellite surveillance, which has already been successfully tested.“Protecting marine environments like the seamounts of Ascension Island is critical to safeguarding a future for our planet,” Sala wrote. “Right now, just 5 percent of our ocean is in implemented protected areas, but less than 3 percent is off-limits to commercial fishing and other destructive practices that are responsible for the loss of 90 percent of the big fish in the ocean over the past 70 years.”Atlantic sooty terns (Onychoprion fuscatus) at Mars Bay Breeding Grounds, Ascension Island. Photo by Drew Avery, licensed under CC BY 2.0.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Suspicions of murder in death of Indonesian environmental activist

first_imgActivism, Crime, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Crime, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Murdered Activists Golfrid Siregar, an environmental activist at a local chapter of Indonesia’s largest green NGO, died this week under suspicious circumstances.His colleagues have questioned the police narrative of a motorcycle crash or a violent robbery, saying the evidence, including severe injuries to his head, indicate he was killed elsewhere and his body dumped to conceal the crime.Golfrid provided legal assistance for local communities ensnared in land conflicts with oil palm companies. At the time of his death he was involved in a lawsuit against the North Sumatra government over alleged forgery in the permitting process for a controversial hydropower project in an orangutan habitat.Golfrid’s death is the latest in a disturbing pattern of environmental defenders dying under suspicious circumstances in Indonesia. MEDAN, Indonesia — Environmental activists in Indonesia have raised suspicions over the death this week of a human rights defender who was a staunch advocate of communities threatened by oil palm plantations.Golfrid Siregar, 34, a member of the legal advocacy team for the North Sumatra chapter of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), was found unconscious on a traffic overpass in Medan, the provincial capital, in the early hours of Oct. 3 and taken to hospital. He was found next to his motorbike, but personal items including his laptop computer, ring, and wallet were missing.On Oct. 6, he passed away from severe injuries to his head.Preliminary police reports suggested he was injured in a motorbike accident or in an attack by bike-riding robbers. But fellow activists have questioned this theory, saying that a traffic accident would have flung him away from his motorbike, and that in the case of a violent theft, the assailants would have taken his motorbike in addition to his other personal belongings. They also note that the injuries were only to Golfrid’s head, and not the rest of his body, ruling out a bike crash.Golfrid Siregar, center, and his colleagues show the lawsuit they filed against the North Sumatra government over an alleged forgery in the permitting process for a hydropower project in Batang Toru, Sumatra. Image by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.“We suspect the victim was beaten up at another location,” Roy Lumbangaol, Golfrid’s manager at Walhi, told reporters on Oct. 7. “To eliminate the evidence, he was brought to the location where he was eventually found.”Walhi has called on police to launch a thorough and transparent investigation into Golfrid’s death. The group also asked the National Commission on Human Rights to monitor the police investigation.Associates last had contact with Golfrid on the afternoon of Oct. 2, when he left home to deliver a package and have a meeting. By the evening, he couldn’t be contacted. At 1 a.m. on Oct. 3, a rickshaw driver found his body on the overpass.The police have said they will call in the rickshaw driver for further questioning and check footage from CCTV cameras installed near the location where Golfrid was found.Golfrid was best known for his work with legal aid and civil society groups in helping local communities ensnared in land conflicts with oil palm companies.His most recent work was on a lawsuit against the North Sumatra government over the alleged forgery of a researcher’s signature in an environmental impact assessment for a proposed hydropower project. Activists say the planned dam would threaten the only known habitat of the Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis), a critically endangered species. According to Walhi, Golfrid had recently lodged a complaint to the National Police against the North Sumatra Police’s decision to drop the investigation into the alleged forgery.Golfrid’s death is the latest in a disturbing pattern of environmental defenders dying under suspicious circumstances in Indonesia. From 2010 to 2018, there were 171 recorded cases of violence against activists in Indonesia, according to Ainul Yaqin from the Indonesian Human Protection Foundation (YPII). Most of the victims were environmental activists.Earlier this year, the head of Walhi’s West Nusa Tenggara chapter survived an arson attack after assailants barricaded him inside his home and set it on fire.“The struggle as human rights defenders will always continue,” Walhi said in a statement.Golfrid Siregar, left, at a protest against the proposed Batang Toru hydropower project, which threatens the only known habitat of the critically endangered Tapanuli orangutan. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Oct. 8, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

U.S. lumber company found importing high-risk Peruvian timber

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored An investigation by Timberleaks has found that New Orleans, Louisiana-based Robinson Lumber Company has a history of importing high-risk timber from a major Peruvian exporter.According to international regulatory standards, high-risk timber imports are more likely to have been illegally harvested.Maderera Bozovich was Peru’s largest timber exporter by value from 2010-2017, but has a history of allegations of illegal sourcing.Robinson has publicly said it will look into the allegations. An investigation by illegal-logging watchdog Timberleaks has found that a New Orleans-based lumber company is importing high-risk timber from Peru.Robinson Lumber Company is named as a major customer of Maderera Bozovich, a notorious timber supplier that is Peru’s leading timber exporter, having shipped more than $103 million worth of products from 2010-2017, according to investigative news platform Ojo Público.Robinson is a fifth-generation family business headquartered by the Mississippi River near the Port of New Orleans, with five offices in Central and South America, as well as a sales office in Europe.The website also describes the firm’s environmental commitments as a member of the International Wood Products Association and a party to the Appalachian Hardwood Verified Legal program and the Forest Stewardship Council.Accordingly, Robinson “follows a clear environmental policy for the purchase of tropical wood and wood products. We believe in our responsibility and are committed to basing our commercial activities on sound principles of proper forest management. These principles have been outlined by the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO), which we fully support.”Wood cut from the Ucayali River in Peru. Photo by Toby Smith / EIA.The ITTO’s objectives include providing a framework for international cooperation and policy development regarding the world timber economy and contributing to the process of sustainable development.Nonetheless, a 2018 Environmental Investigation Agency report features data from Lima’s Callao port showing that in 2015, Robinson Lumber Company received 22 forest transport permits (GTFs). Of these, the EIA considered 18 to be high risk, the most out of the 26 U.S. companies included in the data. Maderera Bozovich, meanwhile, had 22 export GTSs from Callao that year, eight of which were high risk.More recently, Timberleaks found that in October 2019, Robinson accepted five shipments from Maderera Bozovich equal to more than 5,800 square meters (63,000 square feet) of flooring. This is not to say that Robinson is intentionally sourcing potentially illegal timber, as its Peruvian supplier touts its responsible and sustainable forest management practices.However, Maderera Bozovich has been frequently named in investigations into fraudulent forest management and timber export practices, and also faces legal challenges from environmental groups in both Peru and the United States.When Timberleaks took its research to Robinson, a representative said the company had created an internal working group to evaluate the information. Robinson Lumber did not respond to requests for comment from Mongabay.To import timber and other wood products, U.S. companies must follow regulations set by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service under the Department of Agriculture. An import permit must first be approved, which takes roughly 30 days, though the inspection service is more focused on keeping pests and diseases from entering the country.A 2012 photo of a sawmill that processes cedar and other woods from the Loreto Forest. Photo by Toby Smith / EIA.Importers of trees and lumber must also fill out a detailed declaration form stating the scientific names of the included species, the country of origin, and more. Endangered wood — which is relevant to shipments from Peru, given the country’s extensive rainforest — is covered by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).CITES rules stipulate that an importer must have a certificate issued by a CITES representative indicating the source country and that no laws were broken during the harvest of the timber.U.S. importers must also follow the Lacey Act, the 1900 law that bans trafficking in illegal wildlife, including tree species. In the U.S. legal system, “due care” is the legal concept under which companies must do everything in their power to determine that their imported products are legal.Banner image: Experts fear that international markets will close their doors to Peru due to illegal timber. Photo courtesy of the Environmental Research Agency (EIA). Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Controversial, Environmental Law, Forests, Governance, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade, International Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Rainforests, Supply Chain, Timber Laws, timber trade, Trade, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Trade last_img read more

Police issues wanted bulletin for SASOD head attacker

first_imgSASOD Founder Joel SimpsonThe Guyana Police Force (GPF) has issued a wanted bulletin for 29-year-old Maverick De Abrue, who is being sought for inflicting grievous bodily harm on LGBTQ+ activist Joel Simpson.DeAbrue, whose last known address was listed as 56 Broad Street, Charlestown, is the prime suspect in the attack on the founder of the Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination (SASOD).Guyana Times previously reported that Simpson had to be rushed to the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) after he was attacked and beaten by six men.Initial reports were that Simpson had visited the Bourda Market to purchase snacks after a night out when he when was swarmed by the six men, with whom he had an earlier encounter at a night club. He alleged that as he continued to ignore the men while making his order, he was pushed to the ground and badly beaten.He said a City Constable, who attempted to intervene, was also attacked by the men. He was rescued by market vendors and taken to safety. He was later taken to a city hospital, where he received treatment for the injuries inflicted on his body.Simpson had detailed in a Facebook post that the men began the homophobic attack at a night club while he was with a group of friends following a day of activities. He explained that, at around midnight, a group of men entered the night club and positioned themselves behind him and his friends while they were partying. Sometime after, he felt a substance, later identified as beer, being thrown at him and his friends.He recounted that his angered friends began verbally abusing the men but he intervened and stopped them. They then left the night club and shortly after arriving at Bourda, he was surprised when the same group of men turned up and attacked them.Persons with any relevant information or Abrue’s whereabouts are asked to contact the nearest Police station.last_img read more

1 dead, 1 injured in Agricola shooting

first_imgOne man was shot and killed while his friend is nursing a gunshot wound at the Georgetown Public Hospital (GPHC), following a shooting incident at Agricola, Greater Georgetown on Thursday morning. The dead man was identified as 34-year-old Kacey Da Silva, also called “Presser”, of Lot 96 Remus Street, Agricola.The injured man, Seon Bobb, 24, of the same village is listed in a stable conditionDead: Kacey Da Silvaat the GPHC. Based on reports received, the suspect was involved in a fight during which the now dead man and his friend started to laugh.This however infuriated the suspect who collected a gun from his brother and discharged same indiscriminately at the two men. The men reportedly fell to the ground and were picked up and rushed to the Diamond Diagnostic Centre where Da Silva was pronounced dead on arrival. Bobb was treated and transferred to the GPHC where he was admitted a patient.The Police have launched a manhunt for the suspects who are referred to as “Home Alone” and “Gudgie”.last_img read more

Taxi driver feeds estranged wife, 3-year-old poison

first_img…commits suicide as mom, daughter battling for livesA father of three is now dead while his estranged wife and three-year-old daughter are battling for their lives at the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) after the man allegedly forced them to consume a poisonous substance moments before he did the same.Balkarana Persaud and Kavita Persaud in happier timesThe house where the incident occurredRelatives and friends gathered at the Martyr’s Village, Mon Repos, ECD home on Monday afternoonDead is 57-year-old taxi driver, Balkarana Persaud called “Clement”, of Lot 59 Martyr’s Village, Mon Repos, East Coast Demerara (ECD). Battling for their lives are Kavita Persaud and her three-year-old daughter Sarswati Persaud.According to reports, the now dead man’s estranged wife, Kavita, did not reside at the Mon Repos home, but the couple’s young daughter, Sarswati, lived with her father. This newspaper was told that Kavita, who separated from her husband a few months ago, would visit the home to assist with taking care of the child.However, on Monday morning at about 07:30h, neighbours heard screams from Balkarana Persaud’s home, and upon investigating, they discovered the trio lying on the floor, frothing from their mouths.The neighbours sounded an alarm and persons living in the street rushed to the scene.However, Balkarana Persaud had already died before the efforts were made to save his life.Guyana Times was told that Kavita’s relatives, who live a few houses away from this residence, rushed the mother and daughter to the hospital.The dead man’s sister, Brenda, told this publication on Monday afternoon that she was at her home when her brother’s neighbours contacted her at about 10:00h to let her know that the man had died.“Nobody was home, the three of them alone was home, and like the poison like all three of them drink it or something, I don’t know. My brother has two older daughters from a previous marriage but they were not home when it happened. They usually go away to spend time at their mother’s family and they were there when it happened,” Brenda told this publication.According to Brenda, her brother and Kavita had been in a relationship for seven years but went their separate ways recently after a series of domestic disputes.“She does not live here, the two of them separate a couple of months now, problems make them separate with quarrelling everyday…When she comes here she does jump over the gate and come here, the little girl she comes to take get her dressed and ready for school. So that is her passport, she does come to dress the child to go to school, so that probably brings problems too but I don’t know because I don’t live here with them”.She told this publication in relation to Persaud’s other two daughters, relatives are yet to make a decision as to who will take care of them, now that the two have lost both of their parents. One of the girls is differently abled and would need adequate care, Brenda noted.Lilawattie Ramlakhan, whose deceased sister was previously married to Persaud, stated that the man had taken the two older girls to her home a few days ago to spend some time with her.However, she said that Persaud did not appear to be down in spirits and for him to have allegedly committed suicide on Monday came as a shock to her.“When he was by me, he was normal yesterday (Sunday), he eat and drink and spoke nicely. Everything was good and he left and returned to his home. He did not look like he had a problem or anything like that but whenever he had problems he would always call and complain to us”.Meanwhile, Commander of C Division (East Coast), Calvin Brutus, told this newspaper that to pronounce on this incident to be a murder-attempted suicide would be premature.“We don’t have the facts straight other than what the neighbour alleged that she heard screams and saw when she peered over the persons were all frothing at the mouth, so we don’t know if it was accidental, if someone administered it deliberately or what…Police have taken different samples from the home of thing that we suspect or things that should be tested…whatever they used, if there was any cup with water we would have taken that and so on,” he added. (Kristen Macklingham)last_img read more

Timbe handed three game ban, fined Sh1mn

first_img“I am disappointed with the verdict. As a player, I have always endeavored to adhere to the laws of the game, both off and on the pitch and it pains me to be denied the chance to represent my country, especially at this crucial period when we are trying to qualify for the 2019 AFCON,” Timbe said in a statement disseminated by the Football Kenya Federation (FKF).“That notwithstanding is that however much I don’t agree with the verdict, I respect the decision by CAF and won’t be appealing against it,” he added.FKF have confirmed they have received a communiqué from CAF over the same.Timbe will now miss September’s game against Ghana in Nairobi and both home and away fixtures against Ethiopia.The winger only returned to competitive action last month after a long injury spell and he played 45 minutes of Stars’ 3-2 loss to Central African Republic in Morocco.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Harambee Stars winger Ayub Timbe i action against Zambia’s Chipolopolo in an African Cup of Nations Qualifier in 2016. PHOTO/CourtesyNAIROBI, Kenya, May 9- Harambee Stars has been dealt a major blow ahead of the next three 2019 African Cup of Nations (AFCON) qualifiers after Chinese based winger Ayub Timbe was slapped with a three match ban by the Confederation of African Football (CAF).Timbe has also been fined Sh1mn (10,000USD) by CAF following an incident in the first qualification match against Sierra Leone last June, having been accused by the referee of using offensive language towards him.last_img read more