Singapore’s wild bird trade threatens exotic species

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Pet Trade, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking About 48 of the 108 species observed in Singapore’s bird markets were listed in either CITES Appendix I or II, which means that their international trade is restricted.Unfortunately, most birds being sold in the markets are not listed in CITES, meaning that these birds are not subject to international regulations.Information about the harvesting, breeding, and trading of animals in Singapore is very hard to obtain, making it difficult to ascertain the impact of the trade on the birds’ wild populations. Singapore has historically been a major hub for bird trade. But the trade, largely poorly managed, threatens exotic species, according to a new study.A new survey by the wildlife trade monitoring organization TRAFFIC has found that most of the birds being sold in Singapore’s bird markets are non-native species.In just four days, TRAFFIC team members recorded more than 14,000 birds for sale in just 28 pet shops — an average of over 500 birds per shop. About 80 percent of these individuals were not native to Singapore, researchers report in the new study Songsters of Singapore: An Overview of the Bird Species in Singapore Pet Shops. In fact, six of the top 10 most heavily traded species were exotic, about 35 percent originating from the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia, and another 31 percent originating from Central and South America.“The volume of birds in Singapore’s birds markets are comparable to those in Indonesia, although the majority in Singapore are non-native species, hence the need to be particularly vigilant about the impacts of trade elsewhere in Asia and beyond,” Kanitha Krishnasamy, Senior Program Manager for TRAFFIC in Southeast Asia, said in a statement.Over 1000 Red-whiskered Bulbuls were observed in one shop. Photo by James A.Eaton.The oriental white-eye (Zosterops palpebrosus), with nearly 6,500 individuals on display, was the most commonly sold bird in these markets. This striking yellow bird with white-rimmed eyes was once native to Singapore, but has been almost wiped out due to habitat loss and trapping for the bird trade.“The presence of thousands of Oriental White-eyes in Singapore’s bird markets is a poignant reminder of the dangers of persistent over harvesting and poorly managed trade,”  Krishnasamy said. “Singapore lost its Oriental White-eyes largely through excessive trapping, which should have hoisted a red flag warning that the ongoing trade will impose the same fate on this and other species elsewhere until there are no more left.”Oriental white eye is the most commonly traded bird in Singapore. Photo by N. A. Naseer / www.nilgirimarten.com. From Wikimedia, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 in.Some of the birds observed were listed in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which means that their global trade is restricted. Seven of the 108 species observed in Singapore’s pet markets were listed in CITES Appendix I, while 41 were listed in CITES Appendix II. However, the team could not pinpoint the source of these CITES-listed species — whether they were bred in captivity or caught from the wild — making it difficult to determine if the trade in these birds is legal.Unfortunately, most birds being sold in the markets are not listed in CITES, meaning that these birds are not subject to international regulations. Moreover, information about the harvesting, breeding, and trading of animals in Singapore is very hard to obtain, the TRAFFIC team said, making it difficult to ascertain the impact of the trade on the birds’ wild populations.Among the birds observed, some are currently listed as threatened in the IUCN Red List. These include one critically endangered species, the yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea), 11 near threatened species, eight vulnerable species, and four endangered species, including the African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus), the lilac-crowned Amazon (Amazona finschi), the straw-headed bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus), and the sun parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis).The TRAFFIC report advocates improved transparency and availability of trade data, including details on CITES-listed species, captive breeding activities in Singapore, and any quotas that the government has set for trade.The TRAFFIC team also  calls for members of the  public to report suspected wildlife crime to Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA), Singapore’s CITES Management Authority, or through TRAFFIC’s Wildlife Witness App.A Grey Parrot observed in trade in Singapore in November 2015. Photo by James A.Eaton.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Slave labor in the Amazon: Risking lives to cut down the rainforest

first_imgA rookie in the trade of cutting down trees, João* asked himself how life led him to this “terribly wrong” way to make ends meet. Camped out in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest in the state of Pará, 90 kilometers from the Trans-Amazonian Highway, João regretted taking the job, the first to come along in months.He and his colleagues had finished cutting down the first of many massaranduba trees for the day when they heard the roar of cars. “Come on, let’s hide in the forest,” João heard from one of his more experienced colleagues, and followed. Peering through the leaves, they saw armed men appear clad in vests marked “Federal.”“Oh God, get me out of here. Don’t let me die,” João pleaded as he ran further into the woods. His fear was rooted in stories told by his more-experienced colleagues, tales of how state authorities handle workers like him: with repression, prison and even physical violence.After he was found by the inspectors, João said the idea of the state being there to protect him never crossed his mind. But this was, in fact, the goal of the team led by Ministry of Labor auditor José Marcelino and comprised of representatives of the Ministério Público do Trabalho (an independent branch of the Labor Justice Department), the Federal Public Defender’s Office and escorted by the Federal Highway Police. A team of journalists from Repórter Brasil also followed the team and interviewed the workers.The operation was trying out a new strategy for bringing the law to the frontlines of rainforest destruction. Instead of treating workers as enemies, the idea was to recognize them as victims, even as possible allies in the fight against illegal logging.When the group was finally found, João and his colleagues gave lengthy depositions, helping authorities understand how timber extraction works and unveiling myriad possible crimes committed by local sawmill owners. Because of the risks to their lives workers endured on the job and the degrading conditions in which they lived, the inspectors rescued the workers and framed the case as slave labor, in accordance with the Brazilian penal code.João talked about how he would work from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., off the books and without protective equipment. Even though logging is a risky activity, with one of the highest death and amputation rates in Brazil, neither guidance nor minimal protection was given. He described fatal accidents as banal events.“There was this guy who did the same thing as me. He died. He got distracted while rolling up a cigarette. The tree fell off the truck and on top of him. He ended up in the cemetery,” João said.Neither first aid nor medicine waited back at the communal tent. Just a rifle for protection and hunting. As well as an old motorbike to take the workers to the city, more than 100 kilometers on a dirt road away, in case of an animal attack or an accident. But workers did not count on the possibility of being rescued.“There are no accidents over there, only death,” João said. “If you mess up, you’re all done for.”João is a weathered worker with a long resume at some of the toughest jobs available for migrants like him.” He left a poor region in the northeast of Brazil still young and cut his teeth in construction sites and coal mines, where his lunges hurt when he coughed. Even so, he considered logging as his worst labor experience so far.In the blue-tinged shadows of the tent, the workers had hung up their colored hammocks and backpacks with their belongings. Without walls and just a dirt floor, there was nothing kept out the cold morning wind or visiting insects and venomous snakes.“Thank God everyone was already in their hammocks,” João said. “Then one of the men turned on their flashlight. There was a huge snake there, more than two meters long, thick. This guy grabbed a piece of wood and struck it on top, killing it.” Jaguars also occur in the area, with reporters observing tracks on the ground near camps.With a nervous laugh, the group’s cook said she wasn’t scared and didn’t have anything to complain about. She described how she prepared meals on two camp stoves improvised from 18-liter cans. Rice, beans, and spaghetti were the most common meals, with occasional pieces of sun-dried beef that were hung to dry from a clothesline at the camp and frequently visited by flies. The camp water came from the city in barrels and, according to worker testimony, always had a little “grime on the bottom.”The camp’s washtub was shielded by an impromptu partition made from palm leaves and a black tarp. The cook took her bath when the workers were in the forest. For all other necessities, the forest was the only bathroom.Ministry of Labor raids have revealed that it is common for vulnerable workers in Brazil to experience serious labor violations, such as the ones described above. Based on the conditions at the camp, inspectors framed the case as slavery-like conditions in accordance with Brazilian legislation.A tarp provides the only protection from the elements for the workers at this logging camp. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoA bed at a logging camp. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoUltimately, the Ministry of Labor found the sawmill company that operated the site, M.A. de Sousa Madeireira, responsible for the criminal conditions in which its employees worked and lived. However, in his dusty office in Uruará, company owner Manoel Araújo de Sousa asserted he was not responsible for the workers. He said he was aware of the extraction of wood, but he had nothing to do with the site’s operation since it was a self-directed effort by one of his former employees. He did admit, however, that he kept a portion of the harvested wood and that he was the “owner” of the land where they were working.As proof that he could extract wood from the location, Araújo de Sousa claims to have a purchase contract, with no registered title or authorization for extracting timber.As part of its penalty, M.A. de Sousa Madeireira had pay workers’ rights fees amounting to 31,000 reais ($9,950). The sawmill’s attorney declared her disagreement with the ruling holding the company responsible for the labor violations. Araújo de Sousa and his brother are allegedly working to raise the capital.Crimes against the forest, workers and communitiesManoel de Sousa’s sawmill is a small fish in a sea of illegal activity operating in the region. The city of Uruará comprises one of the largest centers of expansion in the Amazon’s logging industry – and government investigations indicate illegal activities are growing more explicit.Trucks without license plates carrying away loads of large native tree trunks are commonly seen entering the city by way of the Trans-Amazonian Highway.Timber harvested by workers at the logging camp. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoAccording to data from the Ministry of Labor and Pastoral Land Commission, 931 workers were rescued from slave labor conditions while harvesting trees from 2003 to 2016. A relationship between employment practices analogous to slave labor and some illegal logging operations in the Amazon was uncovered by a research led by the Integrated Action Network for Fighting Slavery. The study [link to report] indicates that the conditions endured by João and his colleagues may affect many workers in the sector.Places like the logging camp from which João was rescued often do not appear on maps that track deforestation. This is because they engage in selective logging that causes changes in canopy coverage that aren’t large enough to be detected remotely. This illegal practice has been growing in the past few years, specifically because it outwits satellite monitoring, as shown by several studies conducted by Greenpeace and Instituto Socioambiental (ISA)Satellite data from the Brazilian government show this area of Pará lost nearly 400,000 hectares of tree cover between 2001 and 2015. Small logging camps like that from which João and his colleagues add to this toll – but often log too selectively to show up via satellite monitoring.The illegal logging industry also takes specific measures to ensure the timber they extract isn’t traced back to where it was harvested. Previous investigations revealed that after the most market-valuable trees are cut down, the timber is taken to sawmills on trucks without license plates. At the sawmill, the illegal origin is “laundered” with handling documents that change the harvest location to legal sites.In an area south of the Trans-Amazonian Highway, days before the operation that uncovered João and his colleagues, the same rescue team discovered small roads opened up by loggers within the Cachoeira Seca Indigenous Territory, where the Arara community lives. An indigenous group only recently contacted by the outside world, the Arara report hearing chainsaws and are avoiding hunting in portions of their land for fear of encountering loggers.Along the makeshift logging roads within the indigenous territory, the inspectors and reporters saw logs piled up, swaths of scorched earth and tents just like the one João slept in – but they failed to locate any workers. When they came across someone on a motorbike going down the road, the inspectors were informed that they should give up in their search; the team’s presence had been made known through a radio system used by the loggers to communicate.The practice of worker-exploitation in the illegal logging industry appears widespread. While the inspectors were processing João and his colleagues, the team discovered another case and rescued seven more workers cutting down trees in slave labor-analogous conditions. This time, the employer was Eudemberto Sampaio de Souza (no relation to Manoel Araújo de Sousa), owner of Betel sawmill, which was found responsible for labor crimes and required to pay compensation to its workers up to 50.000 reais ($15,800).Sampaio de Souza, however, placed the blame squarely on the workers.“We ask for the documents for each supposed employee,” he told Reporter Brasil. “They say that they’ve lost them, or don’t have them, or will se about it later. You ask for their name, they give you a nickname. Plenty are boozehounds, many are drug addicts. They are people who come out of states like Mato Grosso, Maranhão, Bahia, and Pernambuco. Nobody knows their story, nobody knows their past. Many times, by taking them out to work, it’s saving their lives.” “Really scared”Days later, still more workers showed up at the hotel where the labor inspectors were staying. This time, the reports were heavier, mentioning death threats and the hiring of hit men to intimidate workers.“We came here, but we are scared. Really scared,” said one of the men who knocked on the inspectors’ hotel door. His face ticked nervously as he talked about how his boss hired a gunman after he tried to collect his payment.“If the end of the month comes and a lot is owed, they will send someone out to kill you. I’ve seen that happen. It was inside the city itself. He came to collect and they shot him. There’s plenty more stories like that.”Other workers also noted not being paid for the job, and then being threatened when attempting to collect upon what they were owed.“It’s better to pay three thousand for a gunman than five or six thousand to an employee,” said another man, quoting his boss.The entities that reportedly hired gunmen are currently under investigation, and their names could not be released at the time of publication in the interest of the investigation and for the safety of those involved.Officials arrive to extract the workers. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoAn auditor speaks to workers. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoWhile the definition of slave labor in Brazil extends beyond lack of payment, this group of workers only recognized their situation when they weren’t paid. According to one of the men, “even today slavery hasn’t ended. It just modernized itself. Back in the day you would get beaten, nowadays you don’t. But you don’t get anything for all of your work.”Another worker interviewed also alleged corruption of local authorities has had a role to play in illegal logging activities.“The military police here is dangerous,” said one of the men. “They go to his sawmill and grab money, they grab wood, both the military and civil police. If any one of us turns one of them in to the police, it’s suicide.”The workers also spoke of the total isolation of the logging camps and the impossibility of leaving them.“On election day [2016 municipal elections], we spent five days out in the woods without food,” said one of the men who worked as a tractor driver. “They didn’t come out to get us to go vote, nobody came out.”Another worker claims his employer forced him to remain on-site, and didn’t allow communication from the camp to the outside world.“There isn’t even a way to go out and come back, because the boss won’t allow it. If you don’t stay in the forest for thirty days you lose the job. Only the boss will come over and pass along messages, see how things are. We only receive news,” said the man who has young children in the city of Uruará.These complaints and the conditions discovered by investigations of logging camps have led to an ongoing investigation into slave labor in the logging sector. Ministry of Labor prosecuting attorney Allan Bruno, who was also part of the operation, received the cases and sent them along to the federal attorney general’s office, which is investigating the possible crimes of withholding salary, threatening lives, as well as for environmental, landholding, and tax issues.A meal at a logging camp in front of a stream that investigations reveal are often used for both drinking water and bathing. Photo by Lunaé ParrachoAuditor José Marcelino says labor inspectors are just beginning to understand how the illegal logging industry operates in the region. However, what is known is that it is a trade full of economic risk.“Just cutting down the trees does not guarantee selling the wood,” Marcelino said. “And, since the entrepreneur doesn’t have adequate cash flow, he doesn’t meet the costs of paying the workers what they have the right to.”This economic risk is coupled for the workers, who may have no choice but to resume working for these illegal operations. Even after receiving his compensation, João said he would go back into the woods, under the same conditions, if he could not arrange for other work in the following months.*The names of the workers have been changed in an effort to avoid further violence as interviewees remain at risk.Banner image from a video produced by Repórter Brasil; English video subtitle placement by Mike DiGirolamo.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Investigations show conditions analogous to slave labor as defined by Brazilian law are not uncommon at small logging camps in Pará, Brazil.A recent bust of one labor camp by a team headed by the Ministry of Labor led to the rescue several men living in substandard conditions. Interviews of the men and observations by Repórter Brasil indicate their lives were forcibly put at-risk at the camp.Workers from other logging camps came forward to report instances of nonpayment, and being threatened by guns when they demanded their pay.Although the job is life threatening and illegal, and wages aren’t guaranteed, workers report often having no other choice but to work at the logging camps. This story was produced by Repórter Brasil through on-the-ground observations and interviews with local sources and labor inspectors during a one-year investigation of slave labor practices at logging camps in Pará, Brazil. Repórter Brasil’s Portuguese version of this story can be found here.This is the second story in a four-part series on the topic; click the following links to access the first, third, and fourth parts in English on Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Featured, Forced labor, Forest Destruction, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Law, Law Enforcement, Logging, Modern-day slavery, Rainforests, Slavery, Timber, Trees, Tropical Forests Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Who owns Indonesia’s deadly abandoned coal mines?

first_imgMore than 630 open-pit coal mines have been left behind by mining companies in East Kalimantan. These holes have claimed the lives of at least 27 people, mostly childrenIndonesian law requires companies to fill in their mining pits, and prohibits mining within 500 meters of houses. However, these regulations are frequently violated.Mongabay-Indonesia spent months investigating the true scope of the problem, and the individuals responsible for these violations. Hundreds of abandoned open-pit coal mines pockmark the landscape of East Kalimantan Province in Indonesian Borneo. Indonesian law requires mining companies to fill in pits that are no longer in use, and to re-vegetate and restore mining sites. However, these regulations are routinely flouted, with deadly effects.The deep pits left behind by coal mining, which fill up with acidic water, have claimed dozens of lives. Who is ultimately responsible for these violations? Working together with Tempo, Tempo Institute and Free Press Unlimited, Mongabay-Indonesia launched a months-long investigation into this question.Details about the ownership of mining companies in Indonesia remains highly secretive. Groups like the Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM) have been struggling for years for to force the public release of information about mining licenses. Recently, Mongabay-Indonesia learned company registration documents could be purchased from the government, allowing the team to uncover previously unpublished details about the ownership structure of coal mining companies.This analysis was combined with weeks of interviews, field reporting and laboratory tests to reveal new information about the true number abandoned mine pits in East Kalimantan,the dangerous levels of pollution in these water-filled pits, and the companies and individuals responsible for this menace to public health.This lake has formed in a former coal mine pit, left unreclaimed by the company who excavated it. There are no warning signs or barriers around the lake, which is used by locals for fishing, aquaculture and as a source of clean water. Photo by Tommy Apriando for Mongabay-Indonesia.A vast pool of dark green water, about the size of a football field, sits roughly 25 meters from Elementary School 033 in the Loh Iput Darat district in Kutai Kartanegara, East Kalimantan.The only barrier between the school and this pond is a rusty wire fence, broken in several places.“Pit 2 belongs to PT MHU,” proclaims a red-painted sign board, indicating this pool has formed in a hole excavated and then left behind by the coal-mining company PT Multi Harapan Utama. There are no other warnings posted, let alone a guard, despite its proximity to a settlement and a school full of young children.Indonesia’s environmental regulations clearly state that mines should not be excavated within 500 meters of houses. Investigations in mining areas in East Kalimantan found multiple pits in clear violation of this law.A case from the same district sharply illustrates the dangers of having abandoned mines and children in close proximity. In December 2015, a schoolboy named Mulyadi drowned in a similar pit, also owned by PT MHU. On the day Mulyadi died, this pit was left without any guard on duty. Although the pit is only about 300 meters from the nearest house, there was no barrier and no sign banning entry. The company only installed a sign and a fence the day after East Kalimantan Governor Awang Faroek Ishak issued a December 18, 2015 decree freezing the operations of 11 coal mining companies, including PT MHU.In his decree. Ishak stated 11 companies violated rules by, among other things, not “reclaiming” and “revegetating” their mining sites— technical terms for refilling pits and reforesting the land. The companies were also considered neglectful for not supervising the pits they left behind.Suspending permits did not stop mine pits from claiming more victims. The National Commission on Human Rights found that mine pits left behind by 17 companies in East Kalimantan killed 27 people between 2011 and 2016, mostly children or teenagers.last_img read more

Mammal numbers high in logged tropical forests, study finds

first_imgThe study quantified mammal numbers in forests and landscapes with varying degrees of human impact in Malaysian Borneo.Across 57 mammal species recorded with live and camera traps, the average number of all animals combined was 28 percent higher in logged forests — where hunting wasn’t an issue — compared to old-growth forests.The findings demonstrate the importance of conserving degraded forests along with more pristine areas. Logged tropical forests have a bit of a bad reputation in the conservation community. They’re often seen as sub-standard habitats for animals, especially when compared with the robust and varied ecosystem in an old-growth forest.But a new study published this month in the journal Biological Conservation adds to the evidence demonstrating that these “degraded” forests are worth protecting from further damage.“As ecologists, we’ve known for a long time that these areas, despite being ugly to look at, actually have the potential to sustain large populations of lots of different mammal species, as long as hunting levels are low,” said Oliver Wearn of the Zoological Society of London in an email. “Pigs and deer find more food, small mammals might find more insects and fruit, and the predators of all of these species find a moving buffet.”A long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in Malaysian Borneo. Photo by John C. Cannon / MongabaySome of Wearn’s earlier work had shown that the diversity of mammal species in logged forests was similar to what’s present in old-growth forests. He and his colleagues then wondered how changes by humans to those forests would affect the numbers of each of those species.To answer that question, they set up camera and live traps in a variety of landscapes in Malaysian Borneo, including pristine old-growth forests, reserves that have been logged multiple times, and oil palm plantations. They recorded 57 different mammal species in these areas, and based on the frequencies that each one appeared, they then estimated how abundant the animals were in each environment.They found that average abundance across all of those species actually went up by 28 percent. Small mammal numbers were 169 percent higher in logged forests than in untouched spots (though Wearn did point out that a lot of the first colonizers were invasive species, like rats and feral dogs).“What was more surprising was that this pattern was so widespread across the mammal species we looked at, including some of those that partly make their living in the treetops, like orangutans and clouded leopards,” Wearn said.The clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is one of the threatened species that the study showed does reasonably well in logged forests without hunting pressure. Photo ©Charles Ryan / Sticky Rice TravelRecent research on orangutans, also in Borneo, also found that orangutans do pretty well in disturbed environments.Hunting isn’t much of a problem for the mammals who live in the study areas, which makes these forests unique. In other parts of the world, logging makes forests more accessible to hunters, which can decimate both the breadth of species and the sheer numbers that inhabit them.But in forests where hunting isn’t a problem, the question also remains about how much of the forest we can cut down before mammal populations start to dwindle.“We didn’t find evidence of a neat threshold beyond which the forest is useless,” Wearn said. “Basically, the lower the cutoff used to define forest, the more mammals that will be saved.”In the absence of that type of metric, it’s difficult to determine whether companies that make zero-deforestation pledges are following through, he added.“What does ‘zero deforestation’ actually mean for forests that have been logged?” Wearn said. “At some point, when so many trees have been removed from a hectare of forest, it effectively ceases to be a forest, and so clearing of this area doesn’t really constitute deforestation as we would normally imagine it.”Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) similarly seem to find homes in logged forests where they don’t have to contend with hunters, research has shown. Photo by John C. Cannon / MongabayOne solution that’s gaining momentum is using the amount of carbon held in a forest as a tool for land use decisions. Under these “high carbon stock” guidelines, proponents argue that carbon-rich forests are good targets for protection. That’s because they not only keep substantial amounts of carbon from the atmosphere and thus from further warming the planet, but they also are more likely to protect a greater number of species.“The currently-proposed threshold of 35-50 [metric tons] (39-55 tons) of carbon per hectare would yield really positive conservation outcomes,” Wearn said, “as long as the areas are as large and as connected as possible, and protected from hunting.”Strategies to protect biodiversity based on conserving high carbon stocks aren’t universally accepted, however. Some scientists argue that high levels of carbon and biodiversity don’t always line up.Still, Wearn’s research highlights the preference of having forests that have been heavily thinned over another type of use that requires outright clearing, such as timber plantations and oil palm plantations. In fact, the researchers found a 47 percent drop in the abundance of mammals in oil palm compared to old-growth forests.In logged forests, even threatened mammal numbers remained high, which was something Wearn and his colleagues didn’t anticipate. But their abundance on oil palm plantations was considerably lower.A red leaf monkey (Presbytis rubicunda) in Malaysian Borneo. Photo by John C. Cannon / Mongabay“We still need far more research to be done in African and South American oil palm plantations, but it’s likely to be a very poor habitat for most mammals, wherever it’s put,” Wearn said.He also cautioned that, while this specific research demonstrates that mammals can cope with some degree of relatively recent deforestation, we also need to keep an eye on how they do over the long term.“We know that there are often time-delays in ecological responses,” Wearn said. “It could be the case that some species are living on ‘borrowed time’ in this habitat.”In his view, that makes protecting old-growth forests that much more important.“This increasingly rare habitat is the absolute priority for conservation in Southeast Asia — it is the only home on Earth for species which are old-growth specialists, and is the evolutionary home for species in the region,” he said. “Cut this down and there is no going back.”CITATIONWearn, O. R., Rowcliffe, J. M., Carbone, C., Pfeifer, M., Bernard, H., & Ewers, R. M. (2017). Mammalian species abundance across a gradient of tropical land-use intensity: A hierarchical multi-species modelling approach. Biological Conservation, 212, 162-171.Banner image of a clouded leopard by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Carbon Sequestration, Cats, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Forest Carbon, Forests, Great Apes, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Invasive Species, Logging, Mammals, Megafauna, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Palm Oil And Biodiversity, Plantations, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Zero Deforestation Commitments Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Guilty pleas entered in South American rainforest gold laundering cases

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Two Miami businessmen have pleaded guilty in federal court to their part in a $3.6 billion money laundering scheme involving gold.Illegally mined gold was used to “wash” money made from the sale of cocaine.The profits from the gold was in the billions and also came at the cost of the Amazon rainforest. A high-profile case involving money, gold and cocaine has come to an end for two Miami businessmen. Samer Barrage and Juan Granda pleaded guilty in Miami federal court on September 5 to their part in a $3.6 billion money laundering case. They were arrested and charged earlier this year.Granda, 35, is a U.S. citizen born in Ecuador and worked for NTR Metals, which is owned by Dallas-based precious minerals trading company Elemental. Barrage, 43, is also a U.S. citizen. Neither could be reached for comment.According to U.S. Customs records reviewed by the Miami Herald, NTR managed to funnel $3.6 billion worth of illegal gold to through the U.S. in order to launder cocaine profits. The complaint filed by Homeland Security Investigations and the FBI also reviewed by the Herald, they used a “shifting array of Latin American countries” to move the gold.The case has had reverberations across the precious metals industry.One of the smugglers involved in the case told authorities that he alone managed to smuggle 4,000 pounds of gold out of Chile that was illegally mined. The price per ounce of gold as of September 9 is $1349. That is almost $220 per ounce more than at the end of 2016.  An analysis of the smuggler testimony by Forbes noted that the smuggler said he was also briefed on smuggling practices in the US.Prosecutors have said that the gold was sourced in the Amazon rainforest, refined, sold, and then the profit was wired to drug traffickers and other criminals in South America. Operations also allegedly closely involved narco-traffickers who wanted to turn cocaine profits into cash.South America’s Amazon rainforest has a long, dark history of illegal gold mining, which is known to cause massive pollution and deforestation. There are often serious environmental and health consequences for the flora and fauna, water and people in illegally mined areas.Authorities have been working to crack down on illegal gold mining, but the scale of the problem in the Amazon rainforest is daunting. In 2016, Mongabay reported that in just one part of the Peruvian rainforest, a swath as big as 10 Manhattans has been lost to illegal gold mining.center_img Amazon Mining, Amazon Rainforest, Forests, Gold Mining, Illegal Mining last_img read more

Brazil on the precipice: from environmental leader to despoiler (2010-2020)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img Brazil’s 21st century environmental record is most easily visualized via Amazon deforestation: poor regulation and lawlessness led to peak deforestation in 2004, with 27,772 square kilometers cleared. Better laws and enforcement, and a soy moratorium led to a dramatic decline to 4,571 square kilometers in 2012.Since then, first under Workers’ Party President Dilma Rousseff, then under Michel Temer, deforestation rates began to rise. The rate saw its biggest jump this year under President Jair Bolsonaro, with a loss of 9,762 square kilometers — the worst deforestation since 2008.From 2011-2016, the Amazon saw numerous hydroelectric project controversies, including the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, two huge hydroelectric projects on the Madeira River, plus multiple dams on the Teles Pires River. The Lava Jato corruption scandal and an economic downturn curbed dam building.Brazil’s ruralist agribusiness interests consolidated power, first under Temer, and more so under Bolsonaro, launching multiple attacks on indigenous and traditional land rights. Bolsonaro’s anti-environmental and anti-indigenous policies are a mark of his administration, a trend expected to continue in 2020. Much of the Amazon basin rainforest in Brazil, known for its staggering biodiversity, is on lands claimed by indigenous people and within conservation units. Those protected lands have been under increasing pressure over the last decade. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.In 2010 there were sound reasons for concern over the future of the Amazon — the earth’s greatest remaining forest, especially in Brazil. Huge hydroelectric projects were underway; agribusiness, particularly cattle ranching, was eating deeper into the Amazon; and genetically modified crops had been authorized, making it easier to grow soy in extreme tropical conditions, allowing for rapid expansion. Fewer protected areas were being created and recognition of indigenous land was happening at a snail’s pace.Even so, there was room for hope. Environmentalists felt encouraged by an annual rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon that had plunged to roughly a quarter of its earlier level — from 27,772 square kilometers (10,722 square miles) in 2004, down to 7,000 square kilometers (2,702 square miles) in 2010. Felling an area of tropical forest annually equivalent to eight times the size of New York City may have seemed horrifying to many then, but at least the trend was downwards. And the scale of deforestation didn’t seem to represent an imminent existential risk.The decade ahead, some said, might even hold promise.…Deforestation perpetrated by illegal loggers in Jamanxim National Forest in Pará state, Brazil. Image courtesy of IBAMA.Why deforestation fell in Amazônia, then rose To understand what happened in Brazil over the last decade, it’s necessary to look back a little farther. In 2003, new Brazilian President Luiz Inácio da Silva, from the Workers’ Party (PT), appointed Marina Silva as environment minister. Silva, renowned as a committed environmentalist, was born into a family of Amazonian rubber tappers. Although the rate of deforestation took off during the first two years of Lula’s government, it fell during Silva’s tenure, until by 2012, well after she left office, it was down to 4,511 square kilometers (2,803 square miles) annually — just a sixth of the 2004 level.Much of Silva’s success was due to her strategy of penning in development pressure by creating protected areas around big infrastructure projects and agribusiness expansion. Environmentalists drew up plans for vast new conservation units, but at first congress obstructed. The bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby — dominant in government today — was already powerful, forming a large bloc in the legislature, creating problems for Lula.Then came the assassination of the American nun, Dorothy Stang in January 2005.Sister Dorothy, as she was universally called, had campaigned fearlessly against illegal loggers, land grabbers and ranchers destroying the forest and threatening the livelihoods of poor rural populations in the Amazon basin. Her brutal assassination was a political embarrassment for the government. Responding to international outrage, Lula blew the dust off Silva’s plan to protect vast swathes of Amazon forest.U.S. missionary and Amazon land reform advocate Dorothy Stang. The Amazon land rights conflict that led to her murder in 2005 continues today and is seeing the worst escalation since the time of her death. Image by Tio Palhaço Ribeirinho on Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA.Just a few days after Sister Dorothy’s death, Lula, flanked by Silva, announced the creation of an 8.3 million-hectare (32,000 square-mile) “mosaic” of protected areas, spanning the southern Amazon basin, from Pará state in the east, to Mato Grosso state in the south, to Rondônia in the west — a conservation blockade against agribusiness intrusion.The mosaic, along with other government measures, undoubtedly contributed to the decline in deforestation. But a more prosaic, reason — a pause in the world commodity boom in 2004 – also contributed. The underlying factor fueling Amazon deforestation had been soy production expansion via this process: land speculators cut down the forest, sold the land to ranchers, who after a few years, sold it to soy producers who created gigantic plantations in the Amazon. So a plunge in soy prices may have contributed to the deforestation decline.Yet another factor was the availability of cleared forest: after the felling frenzy in 2004, ranching and agribusiness didn’t need more land.This breathing space made it easier for environmental NGOs to influence international commodities companies to alter their behavior. First in 2006 came the Amazon soy moratorium, by which commodities companies agreed not to purchase soy cultivated on recently cleared Amazon forest lands, and then, in 2009, a beef moratorium. Although structural weaknesses allowed farmers to find ways of getting round them, the moratoriums reflected growing consumer concern over Amazon deforestation.Map showing Brazil’s Amazon Arc of Deforestation in red. Note how conservation units and indigenous reserves act as a buffer protecting the Amazon’s interior. Over the last decade land grabbers, land speculators, illegal loggers, ranchers and soy producers have steadily made incursions into these protected areas, with those invasions escalating under President Jair Bolsonaro. Image by Mauricio Torres / Mongabay.Lula and Dilma: dams and more damsThen came major setbacks. During Lula’s second term (2007 to 2010), Brazil’s economy became increasingly dependent on commodity exports, strengthening ruralist power and emboldening them to openly clash with environmentalists. But politically savvy Lula found a way to mediate: the president would approve a big Amazon hydro-dam to serve the ruralists, then placate environmentalists by creating more protected areas.His successor, Dilma Rousseff (2010-2016), handpicked by Lula, lacked political flair. She carried on with Lula’s policies but made little attempt to mollify environmentalists. She became widely disliked by conservationists, and also eventually by the ruralists, which would be her undoing.In June 2011, Rousseff gave the go-ahead for the controversial Belo Monte mega-dam on the Xingu River — touted then as the third biggest in the world. Rhett Butler, Mongabay’s founder, wrote a heartfelt article at the time, in which he expressed shock at the government’s decision, noting that the dam would displace 16,000 people and flood 40,000 hectares (100,000 acres) of forest.“When I speak to audiences,” he wrote, “I use Brazil as an example of a country that is leading the transition toward a more just and sustainable economy. With Belo Monte, I’m no longer certain Brazil is the model to emulate” Indeed, Belo Monte — with its deforestation, devastation of indigenous and traditional communities, and wrecking of natural habitats, along with corruption – was a bellwether of things to come.Annual rate of deforestation in Brazil’s Legal Amazonia from 1998-2019 in square kilometers. Image by Mongabay / data by INPE.By 2016, leading Brazilian commentators had concluded that Belo Monte was a bad project from “an economic, fiscal, environmental and human point of view.”Over time, the scale of Belo Monte’s catastrophic harm became clear. Many tens of thousands of indigenous and traditional people were forced from their homes and lost their livelihoods. Fish kills caused Xingu River populations to decline heavily. By late 2019, it was clear that the future of the dam itself was compromised by recurrent droughts — droughts that have occurred periodically for decades and should have been predicted — while the dam’s construction was even found to be dangerously defective.Belo Monte was no isolated case. In a raft of big development projects, Lula and Rousseff gave the go-ahead to two mega-dams on the Madeira River, near the frontier with Bolivia. Both caused serious environmental and social problems, and continue to do so. They also built four dams on the Teles Pires River, failing to consult indigenous people as required by international treaty and even permitting the dynamiting of rapids, sacred to the Munduruku people.The Belo Monte mega-dam under construction. It was originally planned in the 1970s by Brazil’s military dictatorship as a series of dams. Image by Lalo de Almeida/Folhapress.When prosecutors from the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), a group of independent public litigators, went to court on behalf of indigenous groups to halt the Teles Pires dams, they often won, but then the government used a highly questionable legal instrument, the so-called “Suspensão de Segurança,” to get its way. Through this instrument, a legacy from Brazil’s 1964-1988 military dictatorship, the government — then and now — can postpone the implementation of any lower court decision until the end of a lengthy legal process by simply declaring a threat to “national security.” In practice, this means the original ruling is overturned.Still, the government and dam developers didn’t always win. The Munduruku and other indigenous groups, along with traditional communities fought back. In August 2016, after persistent indigenous pressure, the environmental agency, IBAMA, denied a licence for another gigantic dam planned for the Tapajós River — the 8,000 megawatt São Luiz de Tapajós. No subsequent government has attempted to reverse that decision.Brazilian President Michel Temer (center) meets with his ministers, many of whom hailed from, or have close ties to, Brazil’s elite ruralists. Photo by José Cruz / Agência Brasil.Temer undermines socioenvironmental gainsIt was the gigantic government-funded dam projects that ultimately helped bring about Rousseff’s and the Workers’ Party undoing, bringing the far right to power.Lava Jato, Operation Car Wash, a massive corruption investigation, found that the PT had been running a gigantic payoff operation involving Petrobras, Brazil’s state-run oil company, along with Brazil’s gigantic construction companies. The scheme: construction firms, including Odebrecht, Andrade Gutierrez and others, offered massive political contributions to the Workers’ Party, and others, in trade for mega-dams and a variety of development contracts. It was Lava Jato public outcry against corruption that finally helped lead to the impeachment of Rousseff in August 2016 and her replacement by Michel Temer.Under Temer, an unpopular president whose approval rating never rose above the single digits, was someone the ruralists were able to easily dominate. By mid-2017, they were largely calling the shots, with Temer requiring their support to prevent Congress from impeaching him for corruption connected to JBS, Brazil’s giant meatpacking firm.The ruralists leveraged their power to boost agribusiness, and chip away at environmental advances, with a particular determination to undermine indigenous land rights. The ruralists had longed complained of Brazil’s indigenous peoples occupying 12 percent of Brazilian territory while making up only 0.5% of the population. Ignoring the key role that indigenous communities play in protecting forests, they asserted time and again that this was grossly unfair. But over time it became increasingly clear that what was driving the ruralists was desire for these lands.Protesting indigenous leaders tear-gassed by police in front of Brazil’s National Congress in April 2017. Indigenous communities saw a surge in violence against them and a loss of land rights since Temer took power in 2016, a trend that intensified under Bolsonaro in 2019. Image by Wilson Dias courtesy of Agencia Brasil.So the first priority of ruralists under Temer was to stop the slow and meticulous indigenous reserve demarcation process, underway since the implementation of the progressive 1988 Constitution, by which indigenous groups gained formal recognition of the land they occupy.The ruralistas’ strategy wasn’t to present bills to Congress where they still lacked the votes needed for passage, but to use indirect tactics, such as accepting a recommendation made by the Attorney General’s Office that federal government bodies should adopt new stringent criteria for recognizing indigenous lands, aimed at stalling the demarcation process.Respected lawyer Dalmo de Abreu Dallari, said of the new demarcation criteria that it had as its objective the “extorting from indigenous communities their right to the land they have traditionally occupied.”Temer did much else: he introduced an amnesty erasing up to $2.1 billion in unpaid environmental fines, especially for illegal deforestation. To howls of indignation from human rights activists, he issued a decree weakening the definition of slavery, excluding those working in degrading and inhumane conditions. But he didn’t always win. His attempt to open the gigantic and pristine 4.6 million hectare (17,800 square mile) RENCA preserve in the northern Amazon to Canadian and other transnational mining interests was defeated by a national and international public outcry.Emboldened by their success, the ruralists stepped up violent attacks in remote areas. In 2017, Brazil became the most dangerous country in the world for social and environmental activists, with 57 assassinations as a result of land conflict.Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro (right) and Environment Minister Ricardo Salles (left). One critic dubbed Salles an “anti-minister, who is doing all he can to destroy what he should be protecting.” Image by Palácio do Planalto found on flickr.Then came BolsonaroIn October 2018 the ruralists solidified their power by supporting former army officer, Jair Bolsonaro who was elected President.Now, the ruralists, in unprecedented fashion, operated the levers of government, controlling 44% of the Congress and represented by a president whose extreme policies even made some in agribusiness uncomfortable. Populist Bolsonaro is a climate change denier, is openly hostile toward indigenous peoples, even believes that landowners have the right to bear arms to defend themselves against people who reject their illicit land claims, and he looks back nostalgically at Brazil’s military dictatorship.From his first day in office, Bolsonaro began slashing away at the web of laws, regulations and agencies meant to curb environmental harm caused by mining, agribusiness and big infrastructure projects.The journalist Bernardo Mello Franco, who writes for Brazil’s influential O Globo newspaper, called Bolsonaro’s environment minister Ricardo Salles, himself under investigation for environmental crime, an “anti-minister, who is doing all he can to destroy what he should be protecting” and who is turning “his ministry into a playground for the ruralists.”Even before Bolsonaro came to power, the authorities’ lack of concern for environmental safety was costing Brazil dear. In November 2015 a Vale Corporation tailings storage dam collapsed in Mariana in Minas Gerais state, killing 19 and polluting the Doce River for 440 miles. Then in January 2019, as Bolsonaro stepped into office, another Vale tailings dam disaster occurred in Brumadinho, also in Minas Gerais. It killed 249 people, leaving another 21 missing.The November 2015 mining disaster caused by the failure of Vale’s Fundão iron mine tailings dam. 1.6 million Brazilians were impacted by the spill, which poisoned 500 miles of the Doce River. A second catastrophic Vale tailings dam failure in early 2019 killed 249 people. Image by Romerito Pontes from São Carlos licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.Under Bolsonaro deforestation is rising again, as illegal loggers and land grabbers take advantage of the permissive political climate. Altogether, 7,604 square kilometers (2,970 square miles) of rainforest were felled during the first nine months of this year, an 85 percent increase over the same period last year.In August, images of raging Amazon fires were splashed across the front pages of the world press, particularly after Brazil’s largest city, São Paulo, went dark at midday as winds, carrying smoke from the fires, blocked out the sun. That one event could be considered symbolic of what may lay ahead for Brazil’s environment, the Amazon and its people.Violence is surging, as lawless bands, emboldened by the ruralists and Bolsonaro’s incendiary rhetoric, kill social, political and environmental activists. Among many recent incidents, two Guajajara indigenous leaders were shot dead in early December, not far from where another Guajajara leader and “forest guardian” was killed a month earlier.Indigenous Guajajara leader and prominent member of “Guardians of the Forest,” Paulo Paulino Guajajara was shot dead in an ambush by loggers in the Amazon on November 1. Bolsonaro’s incendiary language and lax government law enforcement helped escalate Amazon violence this year, according to critics. Image by Karla Mendes/Mongabay.International reverberations Ominously, what is happening in Brazil won’t likely stay there. Experts warn that the current deforestation will make it virtually impossible for Brazil, the world’s seventh largest emitter of greenhouse gases, to achieve the commitments it made under the 2015 Paris Agreement, and may possibly jeopardize the whole global accord.Moreover, deforestation, combined with escalating climate change, is pushing the Amazon toward a rainforest-to-savanna “tipping point” which would result in massive tree death and a gush of sequestered carbon into the atmosphere at a time when the world can least afford it. Ironically, the mega-drought that could soon devastate Amazon forests would also empty Brazil’s aquifers and be catastrophic for agribusiness — and thus for the whole Brazilian economy.Some of the world’s largest companies are getting worried and responding to Bolsonaro’s polices. In September 2019, some 230 global investors with $16.2 trillion in assets urged companies to eliminate Amazon deforestation from their supply chains. Then in December, 87 large UK companies, including Tesco and Sainsbury, signed a letter to Bolsonaro asking his government to stop Amazon deforestation for soy production.Timber illegally harvested inside an indigenous reserve confiscated by IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency in 2017. IBAMA has been largely detoothed and defunded under Bolsonaro. Image courtesy of IBAMA.International pressure seems likely to grow as the president turns increasingly belligerent and aggressive, but it will take more than urging to save the Amazon basin. Some activists think the only current hope for the rainforest may lie with an international boycott. Combined with the growing mobilization of social movements underway inside Brazil, such a boycott might cause the Bolsonaro government to rethink its policies in the years ahead.Disturbingly, scientists can’t pinpoint an ecological tipping point until it is passed. But some warn that Amazon deforestation could be pushing things dangerously close to collapse. Assuring a positive future for Brazil and the world requires putting on the brakes before the precipice is reached.Banner image caption: A Munduruku warrior. Photo by Mauricio Torres.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Young Munduruku warriors. Numbering 13,000 today, the Munduuku, along with other indigenous groups across the Amazon basin, are making a defiant stand against the Bolsonaro government and are resisting ruralist incursions into their territories. Image by Mauricio Torres.last_img read more

What ban? Chinese in thrall to ‘goddess’ Sharapova

first_imgMos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson On her first appearance back, in Stuttgart in April, the crowd gave her a polite reception and then in her Grand Slam return — at the US Open — the crowd was largely supportive.If her Chinese fans are keen to look forward, the Russian is too and in one press conference in Beijing she alluded to being “away from the game for a long time”, without saying any more.But in what is the sixth tournament of her stop-start comeback, she is more forthcoming when asked about the unwavering support she gets in China, where she won the Beijing title in 2014.“It’s always really nice to have that welcome and it’s really special to see fans that take the time and effort to make signs, to come up with wording,” she said.“For them to put in that effort is very special. For them to cheer and welcome me back to Beijing is really nice.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson MOST READ How to help the Taal evacuees “I think that’s an American secret,” she replied, lowering her voice slightly.Pushed to expand on her conspiracy theory, she pulled out her smartphone and tapped Chinese into a translation app.“Political intrigue” popped up on the screen in English. She declined to go into further detail.‘She’s beautiful and so tall’Vivian and Lucia, both 20 and volunteers at China’s biggest annual tennis event, are also diehard Sharapova fans.“She fights to win every game, even when it’s difficult and hard,” said Vivian, a student who only volunteered so she could catch a glimpse of the Russian.“She’s also beautiful and so tall. We walked past her and I was like, ‘Gosh!’”So that makes up for the ban?“So what? It doesn’t matter,” Lucia chipped in. “It’s in the past. So you never made a mistake?”Sharapova, who according to reports is not popular with some players because of her supposedly lofty attitude, had an initial two-year ban reduced to 15 months after the Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled she was not “an intentional doper”. The 30-year-old Russian was in the Chinese capital this week for the first time since coming back to tennis in April from a 15-month suspension for taking the banned substance meldonium.The former world number one is now 104 in the rankings and needed a wildcard to make it to the China Open, where she was to take on world number two Simona Halep later Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogSharapova’s return to the tennis circuit divided opinion, with the Canadian Eugenie Bouchard among her biggest critics, calling the five-time Grand Slam champion “a cheater” who should never have been allowed to play again.But try telling that to Sharapova’s fans in Beijing, where along with Rafael Nadal she has been the biggest draw by far at the China Open. View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbedcenter_img LATEST STORIES Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award DAY6 is for everybody Maria Sharapova of Russia hits a return during her women’s singles match against Ekaterina Marakova of Russia at the China Open tennis tournament in Beijing on October 3, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / NICOLAS ASFOURIOne fellow player labelled her “a cheater” and she is said to be unpopular in the locker room, but Maria Sharapova remains a crowd favourite in China despite her doping ban.“Welcome back goddess,” said one banner at the China Open in Beijing this week, while a Russian flag had the words: “I got your back Maria.”ADVERTISEMENT Gregorius, Judge, bullpen rally wild-card Yanks past Twins In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Suky, 26, flew from Xiamen in eastern China to see her hero in the flesh for the first time.Chinese flags flutter all over the country at this time of year to mark the founding of communist China, but the only flag on Suky’s right cheek was a smudged Russian tricolour. On her left arm and chest she had written her version of Sharapova’s signature in black biro.“I love Maria Sharapova,” she said. “She’s fair and beautiful, and so powerful and determined, she never gives up.”But what about that doping ban?ADVERTISEMENT Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’last_img read more

Norton Street man charged for molesting, bribing 11-year-old girl

first_imgA middle-aged man was on Wednesday arraigned on sexual assault charges when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.Robin Marks, 50, of Norton Street, Georgetown, was not required to plead to the charges which stated that in February, he sexually assaulted an 11-year-old child on two occasions by touching her breasts and kissing her on the lips.After committing the acts, he attempted to bribe her to secrecy by providing cash. The matter was reported to the Police after the young girl confided in her grandmother that the accused had been interfering with her.The suspect was released on $100,000 bail for each charge, and the matter was adjourned until July 6, 2018.last_img

Berbice motorcyclist dies in accident

first_imgMotorcyclist Latchman ‘Kevin’ Hansraj of Bath Settlement, West Coast Berbice lost his life at around 23:45h on Sunday when he lost control of the motorcycle he was riding.Details surrounding the accident are still sketchy but initial information relates that the 24-year-old was returning home from the Guyana Cup Horseracing Championships when he met with the accident.The Police are investing the accident.More details in the Tuesday, August 20, 2019 edition of the Guyana Times.DEAD: Latchman ‘Kevin’ Hansrajlast_img

GAA NEWS: MCVEIGH ON FIRE AS GAEIL FHÁNADA DEFEAT URRIS IN IFC OPENER

first_imgGaeil Fhánada GAA News:Lotto ResultsNo jackpot winner.Nos drawn were:  04, 09, 10, 11, 17. B 08.   €100 winner John McAteer, Gortnatra Kerrykeel,  €50 winner Orla McGonigle, Rossnakill Next week’s jackpot €5,400. Come on support our wee club.Gaeil Fhánada 100 Club Results€500 Davin Gallagher Boyce. Glen. Carrigart.€250 Joachim & Máire McAteer. Rinmore. €250 Christopher Sweeney. DoaghbegSeniors & ReservesDivision 2 Round 8Seniors & Reserves play away to Glenfin next Saturday 30th May.Gleann Fhinne  Sinsir v  Gaeil Fhánada @ 7:30 PM.  Referee: TBCGleann Fhinne Taca  v  Gaeil Fhánada @ 6:00 PM.  Referee: TBC 2015 Donegal Intermediate Championship Group 3Urris 1:06 v Gaeil Fhánada 0:10Foireann Sinsir Gaeil Fhánada:Óisín Blaney, Joe Blaney, Paddy Heraghty, Frank Sweeney, Ryan McGonigle, Fergal Friel, Mark ‘sparky’ Friel 0:01, Kevin McElwaine 0:01, Michael Sweeney 0:02, Johnny Friel, Seimi Coshia Friel, Brian ‘Teddy’ McVeigh 0:06, Cathal Martin, Niall Carr, Marty McAteer, Paul Coyle for Joe Blaney (black card), Ronan McAteer, Davitt Walsh for Niall Carr, Eoghan Carr.Urris 0:11  v Gaeil Fhánada 0:10Foireann Taca Gaeil Fhánada: Seamus McAteer,  Martin McGrory, Ódhran Shiels 0:01, Shaun Coyle, Ken Dempsey, Colm McGonigle, Mylie McBride, Eamonn Sweeney 0:01, Ronan McAteer 0:01, Aidan McAteer 0:01, Brendan Callaghan 0:01, Ciarán Carr, Eoghan Carr 0:04 , Rudi Feenstra, Brendan Friel, Patsy Friel, Paul McVeigh 0:01,Declan Coyle, Conor McConigley.Cumann Peil na nBanMna Gaeil Fhánada v Convoy BMna Gaeil Fhánada just edged out Convoy B’s in a high scoring league game today in Convoy with a winning score of 5-08 to 5-07.  Fanad started the game well with Natasha McElwaine getting their first point in the 2nd minute. Convoy equalized in the 7th minute but with Fanad playing with the breeze Fanad got their 2nd point through Deirdre Friel and then Aisling Howe coming out of defence to score Fanad 1st goal in the 13th minute. Fanad followed up with points from Shona Rogers and Maireád Coll before Convoy got their 2nd point in the 20th minute, only to have Natasha Mc Elwaine score Fanad’s 2nd  goal 2 minutes later. Fanad finish out the half with Sarah Sweeney pointing from a free and Natasha McElwaine and Shauna Howe adding 2 more points. Convoy where thrown a life line when they scored a goal in the 29th minute. Fanad went in ahead at half time with a score of 1-02 to 2-07.Things didn’t look good for Convoy at the start of the second half with Maireád Coll scoring a goal in the 1st minute. Instead of putting their heads down Convoy pushed on and got their 2nd goal in the 3rd minute. Fanad replied with a quick point from Aisling Howe and then Shauna Howe got Fanad’s 4th goal. With Fanad not taking advantage of a good lead Convoy went on to score 2-05 without reply to leave the score 4-07 to Fanad’s 4-08 with only 4 minutes remaining. Fanad got the all-important next score with a goal from Natasha Mc Elwaine in the 27th minute. Convoy got the last goal of the game just a minute later but Fanad were able to hold on and win. Great result Ladies well done all.  Natasha Mc Elwaine 3-02, Aisling Howe 1-01, Shauna Howe 1-01 Maireád Coll 1-01, Sarah Sweeney 0-01, Deirdre Friel 0-01, and Shona Rogers 0-01.U16 & U18 girlsAny U16 and minor ladies interested in playing for Gaeil Fhánada this year, training is this Saturday @ 11a.m.  in Tria Locha.  Any queries or questions please contact John Cushnan on 0863941089.Ladies Board Table QuizMany thanks to all who supported the table quiz in the Atlantic House on Friday last in support of our Ladies team.  Thanks also to Hughie Shiels who organised the darts competition with money raised presented to Hannah Shiels on behalf of the senior team.Comhghairdeas mór LaurenA huge congratulations to Lauren Carr, who was part of the Donegal U14 girls team, who beat Antrim in the Ulster final and collected her Ulster Ladies U14 medal.  Congratulations to all the girls and management from all at Gaeil Fhánada, we’re very proud of you.Last Man StandingWell done to Michelle Doherty who was the winner of the Last Man Standing organised by the ladies team.Well doneCongratulations to Siobhan Coyle on her big day as an inter county referee in Healy Park, Omagh last weekend.  Another big day for the club when it comes to providing officials for Ulster GAA.Bord na nÓgU6 and U10 training in Rabs Park this Friday 29th @ 6pm sharp.No U8 training this week as they have a blitz in Glenswilly, Martin will be in contact via text with information on day and time.This is the last training session in Kerrykeel as the pitch is closing for the months of June and July for repair work, Training moves back to Tria lough on Friday June  05th @ 6pm. Thanks very much to the Kerrykeel Park Devolopment committee for the use of their grounds.U14 TrainingOur U14s had a great win on Monday night. 4-8 v  3-1.  Training continues every Thursday @ 6pm in Trialough. U14 Manager for the season ahead is Paul ‘Dougie’ Coyle.Gaeil Fhánada Annual Schools Sports DayWill be taking place this year on the 9th June in Tria Locha. Usual arrangements.  Anyone able to help out on the day please contact / let Margaretta McConigley or Bridie Doherty know by 06th June.  All help gratefully accepted (parents, secondary school / college students, members, brothers or sisters etc).VHI Cúl CampGaeil Fhánada C.L.G. will once again host a Cúl Camp from July 14th to 19th.  Bookings can be made online at www.kelloggsculcamps.gaa.ie or you can contact Fiona Shiels if you would like to pay by instalment.Carroll’s Nationwide 25 Jersey Set GiveawayCarroll’s Ham are delighted to announce a fantastic competition.  To celebrate 25 years of supporting Offaly GAA we will be giving away 25 sets of jerseys to schools and clubs across the country through our fun Facebook competition.To be in with a chance to win simply tell them why your club or school deserve a new set of jerseys.  Don’t miss out and enter NOW on our website: www.carrollcuisine.ie/competition/ , on our Facebook page: https://apps.facebook.com/carrolls or click on the image below.RTÉ Ireland’s Fittest Family 2015 – call-outDetails of how to apply for the series and a full set of rules can be found here: http://www.facebook.com/irelandsfittestfamily.GAA NEWS: MCVEIGH ON FIRE AS GAEIL FHÁNADA DEFEAT URRIS IN IFC OPENER was last modified: May 26th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Brian McVeighGAANoticesSportlast_img read more