Man Utd given major boost in Kane pursuit as ‘Real Madrid cool interest’

first_imgTOTTENHAM’S hopes of starting a bidding war for Harry Kane have been dealt a massive blow after Real Madrid pulled out, according to reports.The Spanish giants are reviewing their transfer plans after coronavirus ripped into their budgets, like so many other clubs around the world.3 Harry Kane has suggested he could leave Tottenham if they do not challenge for major trophiesCredit: PA:Press AssociationManchester United could be given a simpler task of signing the England striker, 26, who last week stunned Spurs fans by suggesting he could leave the club for others with more ambition to win trophies.MAN UTD NEWS LIVE: Follow for the latest United newsAccording to the Mail, Tottenham could suffer a heavy financial burden when the season resumes because of outstanding payments on their new £1billion stadium, which opened a year ago.And if Kane does force through a departure, it would rock the club to the core, given he came through the youth ranks and several loan spells to become one of the most sought-after goalscorers in world football.The North London club have sold twice to Real in recent years, with Luka Modric heading to the Spanish capital in 2012 for £30million, before Gareth Bale followed for a then world record £85m.United were interested in both players at the time, but after the ill-feeling surrounding the departure of Dimitar Berbatov’s switch in 2009, chairman Daniel Levy was determined not to sell to Old Trafford again.The 13-time European champions Real also have their eyes on a move for PSG star Kylian Mbappe, who Zinedine Zidane is keen to work with, as well as United midfielder Paul Pogba.Jose Mourinho’s side are eighth in the Premier League table before the coronavirus-enforced break in the season, seven points behind Chelsea in fourth and are out of the Champions League after a 4-0 aggregate defeat to RB Leipzig.I’ve always said if I don’t feel we’re progressing as a team or going in the right direction, then I’m not someone to just stay there for the sake of it.Harry KaneThey face a huge battle to save their season after it resumes, but would have been thankful they didn’t have to face United before the enforced break, considering they were beset with injuries and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side were hitting a rich vein of form.Kane said in a social media chat last week: “It’s one of those things, I couldn’t say yes, I couldn’t say no. I love Spurs, I’ll always love Spurs.“But it’s one of those things – I’ve always said if I don’t feel we’re progressing as a team or going in the right direction, then I’m not someone to just stay there for the sake of it.“I’m an ambitious player, I want to improve, I want to get better, I want to become one of the top, top players.“It all depends on what happens as a team and how we progress as a team. So it’s not a definite I’m going to stay there forever – but it’s not a no either.”It prompted Gary Neville to suggest that his hint was very much deliberate, posing as a warning shot across the boughs of the Spurs board if they think they can keep him without grand ambitions.And their initial decision to furlough staff on the UK government’s scheme, which Spurs have now reversed, will not have impressed him.Neville said: “He’s a clever lad, Harry Kane, he’s not somebody I think would get caught out if he didn’t want to say something, so the little opening of the door that he left in that Instagram piece had something in it.3MAN UTD NEWSLive Blogunited newsMan Utd news LIVE – Latest updates from Old TraffordMAN DOWNUtd and City face TWO-WEEK summer if they reach Euro finals before new Prem seasonDEPAY CHARTMan Utd flop Memphis used computer data and analytics to quit Old TraffordODS ON?Ighalo to leave Man Utd TOMORROW unless dramatic extension can be reachedPEA SHOOTERHernandez: Man Utd ‘still haunted’ by ‘mistake’ of Moyes replacing FergusonDEVIL’S ADVOCATEEx-Man Utd star Chadwick dreaded being picked for Keane’s team in trainingPicturedTRAINING DAYFernandes back in his Mini while Pogba arrives for training in yellow FerrariMARCSMANWatch Rashford floor Man Utd team-mates with ‘naughty’ bit of skill in trainingPicturedHOMER WINEngland and Dortmund star Sancho shows off new Simpsons and Sonic tattoosGossipBERN IT UPMan Utd, Arsenal and Chelsea on alert after Bernardeschi reveals Prem plans“I don’t think Harry Kane will have been that impressed with his club a couple of weeks ago with what they did.“He’s a good lad, a solid lad, I don’t think he’d have taken that particularly well and he was probably just poking them back.“In my mind, I think he’ll have been warning them to say just be careful, because I’m watching you and that’s not something we do.”3last_img read more

Two new species of tarsier, rumored to be inspiration for Yoda, announced on Star Wars Day

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, New Species, Primates, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife Nocturnal creatures that weigh in at a maximum of about 120 grams (or 4.3 ounces) when fully grown, tarsiers can nevertheless easily leap as far as three meters (about 10 feet) or more in a single bound thanks to their super-elongated legs — the longest legs relative to arm length of any primate species.The two new tarsier species, described in an article published in the journal Primate Conservation today, were found on the northern peninsula of Sulawesi, an Indonesian island.With these new members of the tarsier family, there are now 11 species known to reside on Sulawesi and nearby islands. It was believed there were just one or two tarsier species in the region as recently as the 1990s. Just in time for Star Wars Day (May the 4th — get it?) comes the announcement of the discovery of two new species of tarsier, the diminutive but surprisingly capable primates rumored to have been the inspiration for Jedi Master Yoda.“Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? Hmm? No. And well you should not,” Yoda once famously said. He certainly could have been speaking for tarsiers, as well, with this pronouncement.Nocturnal creatures that weigh in at a maximum of about 120 grams (or 4.3 ounces) when fully grown, tarsiers can nevertheless easily leap three meters (about 10 feet) or more in a single bound thanks to their super-elongated legs — the longest legs relative to arm length of any primate species.Tarsiers, found only on a handful of islands in Southeast Asia, use their extraordinary jumping ability to target prey with laser-like precision. As the only purely carnivorous primate on Earth, the tarsier diet consists largely of insects and lizards.Tarsier-Yoda. Composite image courtesty of Myron Shekelle.In order to spot their next meal in the darkness of night, tarsiers have developed the largest eyes relative to body size of any known mammal, a crucial adaptation that grants them better night vision even in the absence of the reflective eyeball tissue that most nocturnal species have (think of the spooky glowing eyes of raccoons or cats). Tarsiers’ eyes are so large, in fact, that the creatures can’t even move them around — a limitation they adapted to by developing the ability to swivel their heads 180-degrees in either direction, like an owl.The two new species, described in an article published in the journal Primate Conservation today, were found on the northern peninsula of Sulawesi, an Indonesian island. With these new members of the tarsier family, there are now 11 species known to reside on Sulawesi and nearby islands.The species were given the names Tarsius spectrumgurskyae and Tarsius supriatnai in honor of two scientists who have played central roles in conservation efforts in Indonesia — you might even say they are something like Jedi Masters of Indonesian conservation. Dr. Sharon Gursky, a professor of anthropology at Texas A&M University in the United States, has studied her namesake species in Sulawesi’s Tangkoko National Park for a quarter century and is widely recognized as one of the world’s foremost experts on tarsier behavior. And Dr. Jatna Supriatna, a professor of biology at the University of Indonesia, has sponsored much conservation science research in Indonesia and served as director of Conservation International’s operations in the country for 15 years.As recently as the 1990s, there were believed to be just one or two species of tarsiers in the forests of Sulawesi. Myron Shekelle, a professor of anthropology at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA and the lead author of the paper describing the two new species to science, has spent the past 23 years helping to show that tarsiers actually represent a cluster of as many as 16 or more species. He led a team of researchers who used the species’ vocalizations and genetic data to establish T. spectrumgurskyae and T. supriatnai as distinct from other tarsiers.“As with many nocturnal species, they look quite similar,” Shekelle told Mongabay, explaining why tarsier taxonomy was ripe for revision when he first began his work. “So visually-oriented diurnal human taxonomists ‘look’ for differences among species and don’t ‘see’ them. Thus, studies of museum specimens, which were conducted by competent and highly qualified taxonomists, tended not to pick up the differences.”Field biologists first began to notice differences in the bioacoustics of populations of nocturnal organisms like frogs, crickets, and grasshoppers in the 1950s, Shekelle says. “This led to the theory that these populations were actually a cluster of related ‘cryptic’ species. That is to say, they were taxonomically cryptic, meaning that taxonomists had overlooked the true diversity among many (mostly nocturnal) animals.”Tarsius spectrumgurskyae. Photo by Myron Shekelle.In other words, nocturnal creatures may not typically look that much different from their closest relatives, but they often sound different. And new technologies, first deployed in the early 1990s, have allowed us to test the predictions made by scientists back in the 1950s based on their observations of bioacoustics by collecting and comparing genetic data from populations of wild animals.“Painting with a broad brush, the genetic evidence typically provides robust support for these hypotheses, and in many cases show the splits between the cryptic species to be far deeper than had been imagined,” Shekelle said. “For example, with T. spectrumgurskyae and T. supriatnai, genetic evidence indicates a split of 300,000 years.”Shekelle notes that much of this history about the tarsiers of Sulawesi was first laid out by researchers in the 1980s, who also provided evidence that there were pronounced bioacoustic differences between the two populations that have now been named T. spectrumgurskyae and T. supriatnai. “I do not want to minimize our work and the responsibility that comes with it, but the simple facts are that much of the basic research supporting these two species came not from recent research conducted by us, but by previous research conducted by others,” he said. “What the current authorship team did was put all of the ingredients into the oven and bake the final cake.”Tarsiers’ preferred habitat appears to be primary forest, late succession secondary forest, and perhaps the edge between those two forest types, according to Shekelle. But they’re facing a number of threats: “Tarsiers are fairly abundant in nature, except where agricultural poisons are used, where all potential sleeping sites have been stripped away, and where human habitation makes life impractical for them.”Previous research Shekelle took part in showed that both new tarsier species would likely qualify as Vulnerable based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species criteria. “But what their ultimate status is is really up to the Indonesians,” he added. “The benchmark for IUCN threat assessments is three generations, which in the case of tarsiers is estimated to be 20-21 years. If habitat destruction over the past 20 years, or if projected habitat destruction over the next 20 years, is estimated to be 50 percent or greater, then the threat status of these [species] will most likely be Endangered, given the other factors involved.”The two new species of tarsier from Sulawesi are the 80th and 81st new primates described to science since the turn of the century, according to Russ Mittermeier. “This represents about 16 percent of all primate species known, and is indicative of how little we know of our planet’s unique and wonderful biodiversity,” he told Mongabay. Mittermeier is a founder and executive vice-chair of Conservation International who also serves as chair of the IUCN/SSC’s Primate Specialist Group.“If we haven’t even gotten a handle on the diversity our closest living relatives, which by comparison are relatively well-studied, imagine how much we still have to learn about the rest of life on Earth,” he added.Tarsius supriatnai. Photo by Lynn Clayton.CITATIONShekelle, M., Groves, C.P., Maryanto, I., & Mittermeier, R.A. (2017). Two New Tarsier Species (Tarsiidae, Primates) and the Biogeography of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Primate Conservation.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

RSPO freezes palm oil company’s operations in Papua

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Certification, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Rspo, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The RSPO ordered Goodhope Asia Holdings to stop work in seven of its concessions in Indonesia, citing “poor quality” audits commissioned by the company to ensure it follows RSPO rules.High Conservation Value assessments for all seven of the concessions were conducted by a team of Bogor Agricultural University lecturers led by Nyoto Santoso. The assessments are being treated as suspect by the RSPO.While Goodhope opposes the measures, they have been lauded by environmental NGOs as a positive step. The world’s biggest sustainable palm oil association has frozen the operations of one of its most prominent members on concessions in Indonesia because of failures to meet its standards on new planting.The Complaints Panel of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) issued a stop-work order for seven subsidiaries of Goodhope Asia Holdings as a result of “poor quality” audits and insufficient documentation required under its New Planting Procedure (NPP) rules.The Singapore-based palm oil company, an arm of Sri Lanka’s Carson Cumberbatch, has been linked to various cases of environmental and human rights abuses in Indonesia, including allegations of grabbing land from an indigenous community in Papua province on the island of New Guinea, where the industry is quickly expanding.The RSPO’s action comes just weeks after a group of leading environmental and indigenous rights NGOs hit out at the body for allowing a Goodhope subsidiary to post public notification of new planting plans, which they claimed were “incomplete, substandard, insufficient, and in places factually untrue.”In a letter to Goodhope sustainability director Edi Suhardi, the RSPO Complaints Panel explained that an independent review had found that High Conservation Value (HCV) assessments conducted for its subsidiaries PT Nabire Baru and PT Agrajaya Baktitama were of a poor standard. RSPO members must submit an HCV assessment prior to any establishment or expansion of a plantation, in order to identify areas that cannot be cleared — such as virgin rainforests — without violating the body’s standards for ethical palm oil production.Issues with Goodhope’s HCV assessments included inadequate areas set aside to protect HCV areas and failure to identify how the company had negotiated with local communities to use their land.The RSPO’s letter also noted that key Land Use Change Analysis (LUCA) documentation, identifying areas converted from forest to palm, was missing.The northern cassowary is one of the birds-of-paradise for which Papua’s forests are famous. Companies that join the RSPO are prohibited from clearing pristine rainforests, but many of them do it anyway, thanks in part to shoddy work by auditors responsible for demarcating no-go areas. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.RSPO communications chief Stefano Savi said the action against the seven Goodhope subsidiaries was a “precautionary measure” taken largely because all of the HCV assessments were conducted by the same auditor — a team of Bogor Agricultural University lecturers led by Nyoto Santoso, whose audits have been repeatedly flagged as filled with misleading claims.In its letter, the RSPO set out deadlines for the Goodhope subsidiaries to redo their HCV assessments and complete the necessary LUCA to comply with the body’s rules.It warned that any deviation from this timeline would “be viewed severely and may lead to suspension and eventual termination of membership.”But Goodhope’s Suhardi maintained this week that the action was unwarranted. “We disagree on the opinion that the HCV assessments were of poor quality. Such rating was not based on objective criteria and clear indicators,” he told Mongabay by email.“There is no reason for (the) RSPO to demand new Land Use Change Analysis since the assessments were done prior to land development,” he added.According to Suhardi, the issues stem from delays by the RSPO Secretariat in reviewing Goodhope’s NPP submissions, which he said has resulted in new standards being applied retroactively.He said Goodhope was seeking clarification from the RSPO on the reasons for the action.Shortly after the RSPO issued the stop-work order, Suhardi released a statement announcing the temporary self-suspension of the Indonesian Growers’ Caucus from the multistakeholder body, which he described as a “lame duck” target of criticism.He retracted the statement the following day, but said he had temporarily suspended himself from all positions within the RSPO “due to alleged conflict of interest.”Such allegations of impartiality have focused largely on Suhardi’s role as vice president of the RSPO; a position he claims not to have occupied since 2015, but which Savi this week said he still holds pending his temporary self-suspension.Savi said the RSPO Secretariat was yet to hear a response from Goodhope about the demands for resubmissions and reassessments, but reiterated that failure to meet the deadlines could lead to the company’s membership being terminated.An oil palm plantation on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.While Goodhope opposes the measures, they have been lauded by environmental NGOs as a positive step.“This is the kind of action we would expect from an organization serious about upholding its own standard and procedures,” said Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) forest campaigner Audrey Versteegen.“To be credible, it is the right and only action the RSPO Secretariat could take when one of its members is found to act in clear breach of several of the requirements of its membership.”Annisa Rahmawati, senior forest campaigner at Greenpeace Southeast Asia, agreed.“After sitting on its hands for months, the RSPO has finally confirmed Goodhope’s operations are rotten to the core,” she said.She added that the RSPO’s action should be a “wake-up call” to Goodhope’s customers, including leading palm oil refiner Wilmar International, which had been “far too complacent.”In a statement to Mongabay, Singapore-based Wilmar said the issues raised over Goodhope were not in direct violation of its own sustainable sourcing policies, but had raised the possibility “that we may need to review the way we assess future HCV assessments.”The company said it was awaiting the outcome of discussions between the two sides, but encouraged Goodhope to “continue its engagement with the RSPO and resolve the issues within the RSPO procedure.”The other Goodhope units subject to the stop-work order are PT Sariwana Adi Perkasa, PT Batu Mas Sejahtera, PT Sawit Makmur Sejahtera, PT Sinar Sawit Andalan and PT Sumber Hasil Prima.Follow Alice Cuddy on Twitter: @alice_cuddyBanner image: Oil palm fruit in Indonesia’s Aceh province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.last_img read more

Vietnam makes a big push for coal, while pledging to curb emissions

first_imgAlternative Energy, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Coal, Environment, Environmental Politics, Greenhouse Gas Emissions Article published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Vietnam’s current energy plan calls for more than half of electricity production to come from coal by 2030, compared to around a third as of 2015.In the same time period, Vietnam has also pledged to reduce emissions by 25 percent compared to business-as-usual.Any reforms will require substantial changes to the country’s electricity sector, a tall order for a state-run industry that is notoriously slow to evolve. Shaken by news that Vietnam had confirmed plans to build another 40 gigawatts worth of coal-fired power plants by 2030, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim ad libbed a few lines into a May 2016 speech to an audience of government and business leaders. “If Vietnam goes forward with 40GW of coal, if the entire region implements the coal-based plans right now, I think we are finished,” Kim said. “That would spell disaster for us and our planet.”The people in Hanoi who make energy policy were very likely startled to learn that what Vietnam does or does not do as it develops its energy sector has world-shaking importance. In a mere quarter century Vietnam has raced from the back of the 3rd World pack to middle-income status. In the process, however, Vietnam’s economic growth has had an outsized environmental impact; between 1991 and 2012, the country’s GDP grew by 315 percent, while its greenhouse gas emissions rose by 937 percent.Now that China, which took the “capitalist road” a decade earlier than Vietnam, is stepping up to the challenge of climate change and taking bold steps to clean its air, its neighbor Vietnam risks becoming the new pariah polluter.Railway coal depot with limestone karst background. Viet Nam, Quảng Ninh, Cẩm Phả. Photo by garycycles8 via Flickr.EVN — Electricity of Vietnam — is the state power company. It succeeded brilliantly in the 1990’s when ordered to light up thousands of villages. With Russian help, EVN has done a fair job of building some big dams. In the new millennium, however, EVN has gone from failure to failure. The economy is performing well overall, but EVN has been notoriously slow to change. Current leadership has acknowledged EVN is bloated and inefficient, wedded to old methods and overly fond of yesterday’s technologies, and has vowed to catch up with the company’s ASEAN peers.Vietnam’s “doi moi” reforms made room for capitalism thirty years ago. For long afterward, however, Soviet-style industrial planning survived at EVN, and to a considerable extent also at the coal and minerals monopoly Vinacomin and the oil and gas monopoly, PetroVietnam (PVN). These three state companies and their nominal supervisors in the Ministry of Industry’s Energy Directorate wield considerable influence in the institutions and councils of Vietnam’s Communist Party. Until recently, all have been dominated by people who cut their teeth on five-year plans for heavy industry and were taught that resources exist to be exploited and that externalities are costless.EVN, Vinacomin and PVN aren’t typical of modern Vietnam, or even of the state-owned large enterprise sector. In digital telecommunications, for example, state companies display striking capability to embrace, master and deploy new technologies. Nor is the public shy of change. Mobile phones are ubiquitous. In cities and towns, rooftop solar water heaters have become common. A quarter of a million rural families have built biodigesters to recycle farm waste into methane for cooking and heating and fertilizer for their crops.Up to now In the energy sector, however, Vietnam does not have a comprehensive, reliable energy database. One consequence is that it is virtually impossible to calculate the energy-savings impact of any project.  Nor, noted the Asia Development Bank (ADB) late in 2015, is there an integrated master plan for energy resource development.EVN has struggled to meet the nation’s surging demand for electricity. Brown-outs are endemic during the dry season. Because it’s forbidden to cut power to foreign-invested factories, households and domestic small business bear the brunt of cuts, and incidentally pay higher tariffs than industrial users.Electrical workers in Hanoi. Photo by Michael Coghlan via Flickr.As sites for big hydro were used up, Hanoi’s attention turned to coal.  In 2011, it announced plans to construct 90 new coal-fired power plants by 2025. That forecast has been revised to zero out a plan to build several nuclear power plants and, after Vietnam signed on to the Paris Agreement on CO2 emissions reductions, to promise a substantial role for wind and solar power. However, there’s little doubt that Vietnam will stick to a coal-centered strategy thru 2030 (when coal will supply more than 50 percent of nation’s electric power) and probably beyond.Coal is relatively abundant in Vietnam. Exploiting fields in the nation’s northeast corner, Vinacomin can produce about 50 million tons of high-BTU coal annually, or roughly 40 percent of estimated demand in 2030. The rest of the coal Vietnam will need then is likely to be lower BTU coal from Indonesia or Australia. Leaving externalities aside, coal is cheap and likely to remain so. Further, provided they like the price they’re offered per kilowatt-hour,investors will front the entire cost of new coal-fired power plants.Vietnam can also count on financial support from aid donors for features of its energy plan that aim at improving efficiency (even of coal plants) and lowering overall dependence on coal-fired power. Now that it’s reached the lower middle income rung, Vietnam no longer qualifies automatically for grant aid. However, it’s one of the nations most vulnerable to climate change. On that account, Hanoi is in line for a goodly share of the $100 billion annually that the richest countries have pledged to steer the most challenged toward a lower carbon future.Until now, the World Bank, the ADB and a dozen national development aid agencies haven’t had much to show from grant after grant intended to ‘build capacity’ at the Energy Directorate or from a host of demonstration projects. Still, they’re not giving up. Perhaps hoping that Vietnam may before long emulate China’s dramatic turn toward green and clean energy, aid donors are still putting lots of dollars on the line. And, indeed, with plentiful aid and cutting-edge technologies, Hanoi just might meet its pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent vis a vis a business as usual (BAU) scenario.coal stockpiled at a river wharf in Nghệ An, Hoàng Mai, Vietnam. Photo by garycycles8 via Flickr. Hanoi won’t succeed without energy price reform, however.  Carrying out its recently revised power development plan, or indeed any coherent strategy, depends absolutely on Vietnam’s getting power prices right. There are several reasons for believing that’s going to happen at last.First, EVN is tottering, and notwithstanding its faults and huge debts, the company’s collapse would be catastrophic. It won’t get well on a starvation diet. Though retail electricity tariffs in Vietnam are among the lowest in Southeast Asia, the state has been curiously reluctant to raise power prices. It’s said, and may be true, that Hanoi’s Communist leaders view cheap power as “an essential component of the party’s social contract.” Insofar as can be discerned, they’ve preferred to cover EVN’s budgetary shortfalls mainly by shuffling funds around within the national budget and guaranteeing payments on EVN’s ever-growing debt burden.Second, when power prices are low, there’s no incentive to use energy more efficiently.  Vietnam’s energy intensity (the amount of energy needed to produce a dollar’s worth of goods or services) is among the highest in the world. It’s no surprise that in the business-as-usual scenario, Vietnam’s energy use is projected to grow far faster than GNP. Will the populace rise up to protest realistic power prices? Probably not. In fact, residential consumers as well as investors might willingly pay more for reliable electricity supply.Third, good investors don’t come cheap. Vietnam aims to mobilize a lot more cash, some $7.5 billion annually, to invest in its power sector. A quarter of that amount is to upgrade and extend the national power distribution grid. The rest is to increase power generation, where Hanoi pins big hopes on private sector-financed independent power projects (IPPs) and on BOT (build-operate-transfer) investments by foreign corporations. Nearly all of these will be coal-fired generating plants. They won’t have state of the art emissions-scrubbing technology unless investors are sure they can make a reasonable profit on the cleaner power those plants produce. It’s up to the state, therefore, to require that tenders for new plants specify such technology and to enable EVN to contract to buy the energy those plants produce at a price that enables investors to profit.Solar panels atop an Intel facility in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Photo courtesy of Intel via Flickr.Similarly, investors won’t finance solar or wind power farms until EVN guarantees that they can sell power across the national grid and make a profit while doing so. Although Vietnam’s southeastern coast is blessed with reliable breezes and abundant sunshine, solar and wind power entrepreneurs have had little to show from years of filing applications and knocking on doors. That will change, Hanoi insists, and energy produced from solar, wind, small hydro and biogas, currently negligible, will soar to about five percent of the national energy mix by 2030.There are other signs of more rigorous thinking about Vietnam’s energy future.Estimates of the nation’s future power demand made in 2011 relied on an assumption that annual GDP growth would be 8.5 percent. Even for one of Asia’s most dynamic economies, that’s dreaming (growth in the last few years has been about 6.5 percent). A revised estimate published in March 2016 reduces the annual GDP growth assumption to 7 percent, which is still ambitious but nonetheless allows planners to lower their forecast of total electric power demand in 2030 by 18 percent.Hanoi is mandating that all new coal-fired power plants use supercritical or ultrasupercritical boilers, high-pressure designs that cost more and have a lower emissions intensity, i.e., they pollute less.There’s considerable emphasis on raising the efficiency of the national power distribution grid, which now sheds about 9 percent of its load between generator and consumer.A barge transporting coal in Vietnam. Photo by Dennis Jarvis via Flickr.Apparently mindful of Vietnam’s Paris Agreement pledge, Hanoi’s 2016 revision of its power development plan, PDP-7R, shows a 28 percent reduction by 2030 in total coal use from the 2011 baseline. According to calculations by the International Energy Agency (IEA), that’s possible if all the new plants incorporate supercritical technology, and so result in a dramatic decrease in emissions intensity, the amount of CO2 emitted per kilowatt hour of electricity.That’s good, but still not enough to realize Vietnam’s CO2 reduction commitment in view of the very large projected increase in power use, concluded the IEA analysts in a study published last year. They judge that Vietnam (or Malaysia or Indonesia, also studied) must commit to stronger measures, and warn that all three countries must therefore get ready to separate CO2 from flue gases, compress it into liquid, and bury it deep underground.Or perhaps natural gas will fill the gap in Vietnam’s case. Though gas is less polluting than coal in power generation, PDP-7R projects that the natural gas share of the energy mix will decline from about 30 percent as of 2014 to less than 17 percent by 2030.  That apparently reflects fears a few years back that supplies were dwindling, and also a PetroVietnam bias toward exporting the gas it and partners produce. Hanoi now can count plenty of gas from offshore fields in the development pipeline, while world gas prices are falling in consequence of surging US gas production. PetroVietnam may therefore reconsider its export plans.A commuter in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, wears a protective face mask. Photo by Leo Fung via Flickr.Then there’s public opinion, which counts for something even in a one-party dictatorship.  As the air in Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi and other cities has become increasingly soupy, Vietnam’s yuppies have soured on the regime’s coal-heavy strategy.And last, Hanoi has a history of not reaching its power development goals. That’s not surprising, the ADB concluded in a December 2015 assessment of Vietnam’s energy strategy, because “the persistent mixing of political, regulatory, and commercial functions” has nurtured cozy relationships that frustrate regulatory oversight.  Changing a corrupt environment is hard work; the remedies and reforms discussed above will not succeed unless the nation’s top leaders signal that failure is flatly unacceptable.Which indeed they may do.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Story-telling app and website help communities improve their ‘backyards’

first_imgCitizen Science, Communication, Crime, GPS, handheld, Law Enforcement, Mapping, Portable, Video Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The TIMBY reporting platform applies the wide range of knowledge and experience of journalists, scientists, technologists, designers and security experts.Originally developed in Liberia to curb some of the impacts of illegal logging, the design and function of the TIMBY platform has been customized to fit the needs of the people facing conservation issues other locations.TIMBY has been used across the globe to address a wide array of issues, including environmental conservation in Chile, women’s health in Kenya, and information dissemination in Liberia. At the center of several conflict-prone issues around the world, TIMBY (This is my Backyard) has been working to help local communities hold parties or individuals accountable for their actions.Founded by filmmaker Anjali Nayar as a result of her work with a team of activists from the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) in Liberia, TIMBY has developed into a platform for changing the narrative of conflict stories in several regions across the globe.The platform includes easy-to-use, organized and safe tools for reporting, investigating and storytelling. With automated GPS location recording and the ability to record video, take pictures or upload audio recordings, the platform enables users to report on illegal activities in their communities. Reports can be shared publicly, providing more people with the information and power to hold policy-makers responsible for stopping the conflict.A video of the Jogbhan Clan chief is recorded using the TIMBY phone application in Grand Bassa, Liberia. Photo credit: Anjali Nayar.“There’s an opportunity to not only change the narrative by providing ways for communities to voice their concerns earlier, but also…to stop the takeovers from happening [in the process], before irreparable damage is done,” Nayar said. Nayar said that an issue-based narrative is often relayed in simple terms, such as “community X has lost land to company Y,” but the reality of these processes stretches over months or years, and there are stories to tell from several perspectives.During Liberia’s 14-year civil war, logging was a source of funding for rebel groups, and the access to quick money it provided became invaluable to people. After 2006 and the passing of the National Forestry Reform Law, loggers needed to be issued a government permit or turn to illegal timber harvesting. Illegal logging reduced many of Liberia’s forests and minimized the home ranges of resident wildlife.In Liberia, the system was designed to fit the needs of a given community. The TIMBY team started from square one, building the reporting system to withstand the difficulties they faced running a technology-focused project in this undeveloped region. Their evolving design took into account infrastructure and network challenges, as well as limitations in literacy and security concerns.Members of the Jogbjan Clan gather for a community meeting in Grand Bassa, Liberia. The clan has been documenting deforestation and health issues using the TIMBY platform. Photo credit: Jonathan Torgovnik.“This has all been incredibly helpful in our approach for each new place and project we are expanding to,” Nayar said. “We’re constantly iterating to keep the balance between creating functionality that will be universal and also knowing that projects in this space work best when they are highly customized to problem-solve for that particular situation.”The technology of TIMBYTIMBY’s technology can help users effectively and safely publicize illegal activities or conflicts occurring in their community; nevertheless, Nayar says it is the policy-maker or stakeholder’s responsibility to then solve the problems.“The system takes the frustrations out of field-based reporting so that groups working in this space can focus on doing what they do best,” Nayar said.TIMBY’s mobile app allows the user to collect instant geo-and-time-stamped video, photographs or audio from the field with a push of a button. If a user experiences slow internet, reports can be exported using encrypted zip files for uploading at a later time.The dashboard then makes these reports easy to find and compare over time with the use of instant searches and filters. Lastly, users can share their reports using the storytelling system, which quickly organizes these reports into narratives.The TIMBY phone app can be used for quick, on-the-spot reporting with video, audio or images. The app is encrypted for safety, and any media uploaded is geo-and-time-stamped. Photo credit: Joan Poggio.In addition to simplifying the storytelling process, TIMBY ensures safety to the community members when reporting conflicts.“Between the civil conflicts in West Africa, the Congo Basin and Sudan (Kordofan), the connection between resources and conflict has never been clearer,” Nayar said. “Reporting on these issues, especially those associated with accountability and corruption, can be incredibly risky and difficult.”Several TIMBY team members work on encrypting the reporting tools to ensure the safety of users of the technology. They secure the TIMBY system as well as hold workshops and present tutorials on the app to teach users how to remain safe when reporting.Collaboration between team, community membersTIMBY is a ten-person collaborative group made up of journalists, scientists, designers, security experts and coders. They typically join forces with the activists in the communities working to address a conflict situation.“Land and environmental issues can be incredibly complex and trying to work in this space to solve these chronic issues requires innovation, but mainly collaboration,” Nayar said.TIMBY’s involvement in conflict resolution has ranged from being only the technology partner to working directly with the communities on the ground.The program’s community involvement has expanded from the team’s work in Liberia, which initially focused on reporting on illegal forestry and subsequently on informing the public about an Ebola outbreak. They have also collaborated with communities to reduce maternal mortality and to support women’s claim to land in Kenya and to increase women’s role in politics in the Solomon Islands.Community members in Liberia gather for a meeting with TIMBY’s representatives. Photo credit: Anjali Nayar.Chile’s vast lands hold natural value that is now threatened by industrial growth, and the laws protecting these lands are not being fully enforced because the government often favors corporate interests over those of local communities. TIMBY is being used by a collaboration of scientists, NGOs, journalists and local stakeholders to protect biodiversity and promote sustainable development in the Chiloé region of northern Patagonia. The platform’s real-time reporting of geo-and-time-stamped photos and video evidence aims to support activists even in remote areas in protecting their natural resources.The types of collaborations of TIMBY largely depend on the local communities or groups with which the team is working. Nayar explained that some communities work closely with local or international NGOs to get their stories into the hands of policy-makers, paralegals or journalists.“In each case, we try to work with the communities or groups to figure out what the limitations are and what the best potential impact could be, and then work to that goal,” Nayar said.TIMBY is currently available in English, Spanish, French, Swahili, and Indonesian and will be available in Arabic later in 2017. Your community can collaborate with TIMBY by contacting the group and explaining the issue that needs resolving in your own ‘backyard.’last_img read more

Nicaraguan beef raised illegally in biological reserve mostly exported

first_imgEnvironmental organizations and the indigenous Rama-Kriol Territorial Government in southeastern Nicaragua have reported the invasion and deforestation of the core zone of the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve.The invasion is caused by the advance of agriculture and the expansion of cattle raising.Most of the cattle sold in La Maravilla market come from the company’s paddocks. Some of these cattle are raised and fattened inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve. (This article is a collaboration between Mongabay-Latam and Onda Local, read the first article here)Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, Nicaragua – “When I see my Chontaleños and Boaqueños (people from Boca de Sábalos and around the Chontaleño river) compatriots burning forests and planting grass, I ask them: what is the benefit if you have to burn four hectares of forest to raise only one cow that produces three liters of milk? Why don’t you set aside part of those hectares for reforestation, without stopping being a cattle rancher?” recalls Jaime Incer Barquero, presidential advisor on environmental matters. This anecdote reflects what it is happening with the Nicaraguan cattle ranching model: it grows at the expense of the forest instead of shifting to sustainable cattle ranching practices. It is uncommon in Nicaragua for a presidential advisor to recognize this type of problem.This model is seen in one of Central America’s most important reserves. It is a paradox that in the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, an area of forest is less valued than an area of deforested land. “Here people ask you: how is your farm going? Is it already productive?” referring to deforested areas, explains Saúl Obregón, of the Rio Foundation.Cattle found in the core area of Indio Maíz Biological Reserve. Photo by Rangers of the Rama-Kriol Territorial GovernmentThe logic of cattle ranching Buying land inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve is cheap and profitable. This has facilitated the arrival of many people from Nueva Guinea, Boaco, El Rama, among other places.This is a win-win situation. While in Nueva Guinea a block of land costs 30,000 córdobas ($1,000) —where the land has been prepared and legalized for livestock, in the forested areas it is illegally traded for 2,000 córdobas ($66), says Alejandro Mairena of the Cooperative of Producers of Cacao Familias Unidas de El Castillo, Río San Juan.Marcos Gómez from the community of Nueva Quezada, in the buffer zone of the reserve, adds that commercializing the lands of the reserve has become a business. “There are a lot of people who have good farms adjacent to the reserve. They sell the land, mark the limits of another area and then sell it, and so on…”In a recent trip by Mongabay-Latam and Onda Local to the interior of the reserve, it was confirmed that the cattle rancher José Antonio Solís Durón took 2,000 blocks (1,400 hectares) near the Chontaleño River. Maps of the Rama-Kriol Territorial Government—an indigenous group that represents nine territories and is legally recognized by the Nicaraguan State—and GPS references coincide in locating this river and “La Haciendita” of Solís Durón in the core area of the reserve. That is, Solis is inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, although he said that he “bought” the block for 1,000 córdobas ($33).The haciendita inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, where José Solís Durón usurped 1,400 hectares of land. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalSolís Durón’s haciendita. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalThe story continues. Solis Durón and his family also own a 700-hectare farm in the community of San José in Nueva Guinea. The cattle rancher also confirmed he owns another 200 blocks (140 hectares) in Sangni Laya, Siuna municipality, North Caribbean, where the Bosawás Biosphere Reserve is located in Mayangna indigenous territory, and another farm of 500 blocks (350 hectares) in La Danta, inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve.The study “Dynamics of land grabbing in southeastern Nicaragua” (2016) by Amaru Ruiz, president of the Rio Foundation, states that the central government, instead of implementing the environmental legal framework, promotes a developmental model that favors extensive cattle raising, monocultures, and mega projects that leads to environmental degradation.Under this dynamic, the illegal purchase and sale of land has accelerated in southeastern Nicaragua. Cattle farmers take advantage of those who have established areas of cultivation with water sources.Income at the expense of the environmentHistorically, Nicaragua’s predominant economic activity has been agriculture and livestock production. The last census in 2011 registered a herd of 4.2 million head of cattle, a figure that grew to 5.3 million in 2015, according to the Central Bank of Nicaragua and the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.In 2016, beef was the primary export, surpassing traditional products like coffee and sugar. The government’s Plan for Production, Consumption and Trade in the 2017-2018 Cycle reported that in 2016, meat exports totaled $420.5 million; it is expected that by 2017 it will generate $500 million.The livestock groups agree that there are about 140,000 farms in the country, which rely on the environment, rainfall, and temperatures. At high temperatures cows do not produce milk and therefore, cattle reproduction decreases. “Rain provides pastures their nutritional quality and volume needed to grow, which then serves as food. This is one of the reasons why the cattle ranching frontier is advancing towards wetlands,” says Álvaro Vargas of the Federation of Livestock Associations of Nicaragua.Raising cattle in humid areas decreases costs; in dry areas, they have to invest in food supplements instead.Photo courtesy of Onda LocalThe Alexander Von Humboldt Center, a Nicaraguan institution specializing in environmental issues, revealed in its study “Land Use Change” that from 2011 to 2016, there was a reduction of more than one million hectares of open and closed broadleaved forest, mainly in protected areas and biosphere reserves. The study points out that there was a conversion of forests to grasslands and other monocultures such as the African palm. Grasslands gained 997,000 hectares in five years. The two biosphere reserves in Nicaragua, Bosawás and Indio Maíz, were the most affected.Regarding Indio Maíz, the study indicates that the buffer zones present a significant increase of pastures and little natural regeneration of the forest, and also states the urgency of changing the current model of livestock production “which has and must be reconverted” to intensive livestock, to apply technology, to better redistribute spaces, and to encourage the use of agroforestry and silvicultural systems. Thus, the producers would improve environmental conditions on their land and would have no reason to migrate to areas of forest.Tracking Program: A legality disguise?Breeding livestock within the reserve is illegal and those who do it are aware of the regulatory framework. The cattle in the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve are marked. They have owners and should appear in a local registry, and their owners should pay the municipality annually, who should then verify that the cattle exist in the municipality and comply with property regulations.Claribel Castillo, mayor of Nueva Guinea, one of the four municipalities where the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve is located, was not at home and did not respond to calls to discuss the issue. Enrique Téllez, the municipal councilman, affirmed that the municipality does not do much on the issue. “They just collect sales letters (the municipality’s document that legalizes the sale of cattle). It costs 40 córdobas ($1.30). There is supposed to be control at the municipal level, but there are always controls and records that corrupt them.” While corruption exists, anything can happen, he said.According to Solís Durón, he registered in the municipality of Nueva Guinea the iron with which he marks his cattle (with the initials “JSD”). The iron is a legal requirement for trading cattle and it must be registered in the municipality of its owner’s origin.However, as Solís needed to take out his cattle from the haciendita through the community of La Maravilla, he had to also register the iron in the municipality of Boca de Sábalos in Río San Juan to be able to mark his cattle. He first had to check whether the municipality already had an iron with his initials. “They looked in their files and there was no iron similar to mine. Because I registered it as a buying and selling deal, the officials saw me quickly,” said the rancher.But Mongabay-Latam and Onda Local verified that the JSD iron was not registered in the municipality of Boca de Sábalos, which indicates that Solís obtained the transport certificate and sales letter illegally. The municipality has a service window exclusively for farmers in the community Kilometer 20, near La Maravilla, where Solís said he had taken the cattle transport certificate and the sales letter.In Nueva Guinea, there are six artisan blacksmith workshops. Only three are authorized by the municipality. Photo courtesy Onda LocalBesides the irregularities in the registry, blacksmith’s workshops make irons for cattle often without authorization of the municipality, making falsification possible. “I do not have the permit, but I still do it,” said one craftsman. Therefore, people can ask for an iron and then use it without a legal registration in the municipality.The lack of control of registration procedures, transport certificates, sales letters, iron records, and poor coordination among municipalities facilitates the legalization of stolen cattle in other municipalities, says municipal councilman Aquiles Matamoro, who adds that the situation was raised with the mayor, but they didn’t get a response.In addition to an iron, cattle with a tag or earring can be registered with a database where it is possible to verify the name of the owner or former owners, farm number, origin, age, race, sex, transfers, among other things.The tool is part of the Livestock Tracking Program, created in 2009 and administered by the former Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAGFOR). Since 2014, the Institute of Agricultural Health and Protection (IPSA) is in charge of the program. Its website says that traceability aids health surveillance and disease control, facilitates certification processes and access to higher value markets, stops cattle raiding, and other functions.The municipality of Nueva Guinea (282 kilometers from Managua) is a pioneer in traceability, with its system initially implemented with cattle ranchers organized in cooperatives. In 2014, the program was better implemented under the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). “If you do not register your cattle you will not be able to sell them,” said Donald Ríos, former municipal mayor and president of the Nueva Guinea Producers, Breeders and Farmers Association (Asoprogan).But the program is in the process of being consolidated, which is why Nicaragua does not export meat to Japan or Europe, says Ignacio Vélez, of the Livestock Entrepreneurship project of TECHNOSERVE, which since 1976 has helped small producers access formal markets, improve the quality of their production, increase their profits, and be more competitive while supporting traceability. This “makes the farmers better manage their animals,” he added.Cow with earring near the haciendita, in the interior of the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve. Photo by Rangers of the Rama-Kriol Territorial GovernmentThe earring represents security and benefits for farmers. What does it mean for Indio Maíz where there are tagged cattle?The investigation done in the reserve concluded that the cattle with earrings had owners, however the information is not public and only the technical staff of IPSA can access it, as well as the owners. One must have a judge’s authorization.Ignacio Vélez mentions that traceability is only a registry; it should not take care of the forest. “The national laws, the municipal laws, should be the ones that take care of it.”It seems impossible to move livestock from one place to another with the municipality’s tracking and monitoring program, much less introduce them into a protected area. But in Nueva Guinea, cattle raiding is real. “As there are stalls at the border of each municipality, they produce sales letters and weigh and sell cattle,” says the president of Asoprogan.When we were looking for information we met Israel Castillo. He came to Nueva Guinea to find out if livestock prices were better here than in the San Francisco area, in Bluefields (South Caribbean) —where he comes from. Castillo has 70 blocks of land where he breeds and fattens cattle for sale. “They are legal animals with their sales letters, my iron and tags.”Israel Castillo. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalBut Castillo says some people transport livestock without documentation. He blames corruption: “… from the thief and the municipalities; and sometimes even the police. If that person has already moved cattle and has paid policemen and the municipality, they are all partners.”Juan Castillo, an assistant in a truck that transports cattle, is waiting for authorization outside of the Nueva Guinea police station. He will go to the Matadero San Martín (slaughterhouse), in Nandaime, Granada, with 14 bulls and two cows. He recalls that one time his boss ordered him to cover the cow’s iron brands with manure when passing through the police checkpoints to avoid inspection. He adds that there is corruption. “At these checkpoints, (I) pay 50 pesos ($1.60) to a guard and sometimes they don’t even inspect the truck.”Where do the introduced cattle of the reserve end up?Seventy-five percent of the cattle slaughtered in Nicaragua are processed in industrial slaughterhouses, most of which are aggregated within the Nicaraguan Meat Chamber. They gather the meat that is generally exported and try to meet the demand for quality by slaughtering young bulls (less than two years).The remaining 25% of the killings are in municipal slaughterhouses. Although the municipalities recommend some sanitary procedures, the quality requirement is not the same, because it is for local consumption.Marketers buy cheap and thin cattle and fatten them to increase their volume. Companies also buy cattle.Trading animals is difficult, says cattle rancher José Solís Durón. Due to the remoteness and difficulty of accessing the haciendita, people have to walk long hours with the cattle to transport them to other places. “The cattle get injured,” states Solís and explains that after leaving the mountain cattle have to rest for at least a day. “You will not find people that will rent you pasture for a lot of days. Although some friends could do you the favor of renting you pastures for the night.”Solís says that currently he sells cattle to “some Mexicans who own a company, SuKarne. They don’t want old cattle. And those people pay well. Before it was better for me to sell it there than at the ‘point’ (La Maravilla), because when the cows were injured they do not sell for much.” We wanted to verify the trade but SuKarne did not reply to our request.He added that he recently sold 70 steers, the same amount we found that were being fattened in the haciendita. Another trading place is the slaughterhouse in Managua, he adds. “It’s like 100 ($3.33) a kilo, but they paid 98 ($3.26).” Who did they sell it to? “To Carnic.”Iron found by Mongabay-Latam and Onda Local in the haciendita, property usurped by cattleman José Solís Durón, inside Indio Maíz. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalMongabay-Latam and Onda Local requested an interview with the management of this company to understand the control mechanisms of the cattle they buy, addressing the company’s commitment to the environment. We told them about our research but they rejected our interview request. Jose Luis Núñez, general manager, stated by email that Solís was not among their suppliers.However, Solís says that he had to have a good liaison to sell his cattle to SuKarne and Carnic. “A friend that I’ve worked with for a long time connected me to the companies. The buyer at La Maravilla buys a lot.” His friend told him that he would do all the paperwork and transport them in the truck.Livestock on the scale of La Maravilla. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalSome of the slaughterhouses that operate in Nicaragua are El Matadero San Martín, Nova Terra S.A., Nuevo Carnic S.A., MASESA S.A.; and for seven years the Mexican transnational, Ganadería Integral Nicaragua S.A.—known as SuKarne—which in recent years has collected livestock in several municipalities, according to people of La Maravilla and Junier Herrera Maradiaga, representative of SuKarne in Nueva Guinea, who adds that among the company’s requirements is that the cattle is marked as required by its international clientele and the security measures of the company.Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega attended the inauguration of the $115 million SuKarne processing plant in Villa El Carmen, located about 45 kilometers from Managua. SuKarne is the Mexican company with the largest presence in the global animal protein market.Residents living inside the buffer zone of the reserve noted that Sukarne paddocks are the main destination for cattle traded in La Maravilla; much of this cattle is raised and fattened inside the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, several traders said. “It goes to Managua,” confirmed Elías Martínez, from Boca de Escaleras.SuKarne Nueva Guinea. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalNicaragua and Costa Rica take advantage of the fact that the other Central American countries do not produce enough meat to export; both countries have better livestock potential.But the best market and destination of the Nicaraguan industry’s top-quality meat is the United States. However, quality does not seem to be a consumer right for Nicaraguan people, says Álvaro Vargas, from the Federation of Livestock Associations. “Good meat is exported, bad meat remains in the country. The select cuts are gone, we eat the rest.”State permissiveness?When entering the reserve no one asks you where you are going. People come in on a day-to-day basis, and there is not even a checkpoint. Virgilio Jirón, a cattle trader who we met at La Maravilla, said that there was a checkpoint a while ago, but now it’s gone. For him, this is one of the reasons why people invade the reserve: “If the president does not do something soon, Nicaragua will lose the reserve,” he emphasized.In La Maravilla we found a checkpoint of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARENA): a humble wooden house with a chair and a table. “This checkpoint monitors other checkpoints like Aguas Zarcas, El Diamante and Samaria, although they are currently abandoned,” said the manager, and added that between December 2016 and January 2017, MARENA and the Army carried out evictions in some areas of the reserve and set ranches on fire. The worker refused to give more information and told us to ask MARENA-central.We requested an interview with the head of MARENA to hear their opinion about what is happening inside the reserve and what measures would they take, but we did not get a response.In August 2011, MARENA, the Rama-Kriol Territorial Government (GTRK) and the Autonomous Regional Council of the South Caribbean Coast signed a joint agreement for the management and protection of protected areas. However, the GTRK has disagreements over the non-compliance of MARENA. “The technicians who take care of this process are rarely seen,” says the GTRK. However, they intend to have meetings with representatives of institutions such as MARENA to “enforce the implementation of the signed commitments.”On July 12, 2017, the GTRK filed a formal complaint with MARENA. José Solís Durón was accused of “excessive and indiscriminate deforestation” for livestock exploitation purposes inside the core area of the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve. They demanded proper intervention of the government: investigation, follow-up, and visits to the affected area. They pointed out that Solís violated various articles of the Political Constitution and the Environmental Law.Deforestation around the haciendita. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalThe Nicaraguan government has remained silent despite declarations from the GTRK, cattle rancher associations, and other civil society stakeholders.According to Article 363 of the Criminal Code, whoever puts the environment, property and/or life of the population in serious danger will be punished with imprisonment of three to six years and 600 to 900 days of probation. Also, whoever incurs the crime of usurpation, invasion of communal or indigenous lands, will be sanctioned with one to three years in prison.Nazario Martínez of the GTRK, during the radio edition of the Onda Local program on July 21, mentioned that they are waiting with “hope” for Nicaraguan government intervention. Allen Clair, also of the GTRK, added that in the absence of a prompt state response, they would assume the complicity of the government. “The Nicaraguan government has the opportunity to demonstrate that it is interested in the indigenous communities, but we will take its silence as if they promoted the invasion.”Press conference of the Rama-Kriol Territorial Government held on Tuesday, 11 July. Photo courtesy of Onda LocalThe indigenous resistance continuesIn the indigenous and Afro-descendant worldview, life is closely linked to the forest. In exchange for protection, respect, and teaching new generations about the ecosystem’s importance, the forest provides them with food and a home. It is a relationship of interdependency between animals, plants, and people.The Indio Maíz Biological Reserve is going through difficult days. That is why the GTRK sends community members inside the reserve to build surveillance posts and protect their territories.Except for the indigenous resistance, it seems to be a bleak picture for the Indio Maíz Biological Reserve and Nicaragua. Although the country is reputed to have one of the best legal frameworks for the defense of the environment and nature, it seems that the highest authorities lack the political will to enforce it.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on August 15, 2017. Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Indigenous Peoples Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Romina Castagninolast_img read more

Audio: Is forest certification an effective strategy? Plus acoustic ecology of the Javan rhino

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Acoustic, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fragmentation, Giraffes, Impact Of Climate Change, Podcast, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Sea Ice, Tropical Forests, Wildlife We take a closer look at the evidence for the effectiveness of forest certification schemes on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast.Mongabay recently kicked off a new in-depth series called “Conservation Effectiveness” that looks at the scientific literature examining how well various conservation types work, from forest certification to payments for ecosystem services and community forestry. The first installment is out now, and Zuzana Burivalova, a tropical forest ecologist at Princeton University who did the research analysis that the article was based on, is here to speak with us about what she found.We also speak with Steve Wilson, who is currently working on a PhD at the University of Queensland on Javan rhino ecology and conservation. This is our latest Field Notes segment, in which Wilson will play for us three different Javan rhino vocalisations and fill us in on what the rhinos use these calls for. We take a closer look at the evidence for the effectiveness of forest certification schemes on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast.The first installment of Mongabay’s new “Conservation Effectiveness” series was published on September 21st, taking a look at the existing body of research on the effectiveness of forest certification. Zuzana Burivalova, a tropical forest ecologist at Princeton, performed the analysis of the scientific literature on certification, and Mongabay staff writer Shreya Dasgupta did the addition reporting and wrote the article.Burivalova appeared once before on the Mongabay Newscast for a Field Notes segment in which she played for us recordings of a variety of different habitat types in Indonesian Borneo. She joins us on this episode to discuss the results of her analysis of forest certification schemes.Our second guest is Steve Wilson, who is currently completing his PhD at the University of Queensland and is also a land and biodiversity manager for the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority in Australia, where he is a colleague of Jo Wood, who appeared on the Mongabay Newscast back in August.Wilson and Wood have just written a paper on Javan rhino vocalizations together, and Wilson is here today to play us some of the recordings they’ve made. The critically endangered Javan Rhino is considered to be perhaps the rarest rhino in the world, with just around 60 animals believed to survive in the wild, all confined to Indonesia’s Ujung Kulon National Park.Here’s this episode’s top news:At 2017 minimum, scientists ask: Is Arctic entering the Thin Ice Age?New research suggests tropical forests are now a net source of carbon emissionsTemer uses controversial deforestation data in speech to UNTraffickers find new ways to smuggle rhino horn out of Africa‘Snow white’ giraffes caught on video for the first timeYou can read more about all of these top news items at Mongabay.com. And if you’d like to request email alerts when we publish new stories on specific topics that you care about most, from forests and oceans to indigenous people’s rights and more, visit alerts.mongabay.com and sign up!You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or RSS.Nineteenth century illustration of a Javanese rhino. The species is so elusive few photographs exist. Image courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Where, oh where, are the rhinos of Bukit Barisan Selatan?

first_imgSome claim a small but viable population of about a dozen rhinos persists deep within the forests of Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park on Sumatra’s southwestern coast.Camera traps haven’t captured a single rhino there since 2014, spurring doubts there are any rhinos remaining at all.The disputed numbers lead to questions about what should happen to any rhinos that might remain in the park — and to the rangers assigned to protect them. This is the second article in our four-part series “Is Anyone Going to Save the Sumatran Rhino?” Read Part One, a look at how many rhinos remain in the wild here.LAMPUNG, Indonesia — Dripping with sweat, breathing heavily, I followed several members of the Rhino Protection Unit (RPU) down a steep, forested slope characteristic of Sumatra’s Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park. I was thankful whenever we paused: to look at a spot where a deer had rubbed against a tree, or examine the cabbage-like giant Rafflesia flower that we’d just missed blooming. Near the bottom of the slope we stopped long enough to take a drink over a large indentation in the ground.“This is Rosa’s wallow,” said Marsum, the field coordinator of the RPUs at Bukit Barisan Selatan, on the southwestern coast of the island of Sumatra.“Rosa? Wait — the rhino Rosa?”“Yes, she used to wallow here,” explained Marsum, who, like many Indonesians, goes by one name.We were within 20 minutes’ walk of the road and the RPU camp, a cluster of buildings on the slopes of cloud forest. A Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), here?Rosa at her home at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. Photo by Willem v Strien via Flickr.Today, Rosa lives in the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS), just inside Way Kambas National Park on Sumatra’s east coast, where she was moved in 2005 for her safety. Unlike most of her kind, Rosa had become unafraid of people, even eating out of their gardens. The last straw came when she was found in a local market, followed by hundreds of villagers. Zulfi Arsan, the head veterinarian at the SRS, describes her behavior as “kind of disturbed”.Around the time of Rosa’s escapades, experts estimated that Bukit Barisan Selatan was home to 60 to 80 rhinos. But Rosa may have been one of the final rhinos of Bukit Barisan Selatan, representing a last gasp for this population, and a warning of imminent extinction of her species — the oldest, smallest, hairiest and most vocal of the rhinos.There are two narratives about the rhinos in Bukit Barisan Selatan. One claims that a small but potentially viable and still breeding population of about a dozen individuals persists deep within the forest. The other is that the rhinos are all but gone; maybe a few individuals survive or maybe the last one died in recent years, leaving Bukit Barisan Selatan bereft of the Sumatran rhino, like so many other sites in Asia today.The story of Bukit Barisan Selatan’s rhinos, and whether Rosa was one of the last, raises the central question of Sumatran rhinos today: should we capture the rest of the rhinos for captive breeding, or can any population still survive in the wild? But there is another, lesser discussed, question here. What happens to the brave men and women who today protect the rhinos of Bukit Barisan Selatan? What happens to the Rhino Protection Units if there are no more rhinos to protect?Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park lies at the southwestern tip of Sumatra Island. Way Kambas, another rhino habitat is to the east, and Kerinci Seblat, once home to the species, to the north.Rhino signs?In an effort to better count Bukit Barisan Selatan’s rhinos, Rhino Protection Units collected 62 samples of rhino dung in 2012 and 2013. But when genetic testing was performed, the results surprised everyone: over 60 percent of the samples were not rhino, but tapir.As experts watched rhinos disappear from other sites like Kerinci Seblat National Park, further north along the Bukit Barisan mountain range, and Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, a discomfiting realization overtook them: we’d been overestimating Sumatran rhino populations for decades. Was the same thing happening in Bukit Barisan Selatan? Were we confusing signs of tapir, and other large animals, for rhinos? Were we victims of wishful thinking?The RPU, which is funded largely by the International Rhino Foundation (IRF), has four tasks: protection, surveying, habitat restoration, and investigation of poachers and the illegal wildlife trade.But after the tapir dung incident, many began to question whether the RPUs had the expertise necessary to accurately estimate rhino populations. Were they, as had happened so many times before, finding “rhinos” where there weren’t any?Currently the RPUs monitor rhinos via “signs”: footprints, dung, wallows, twisted branches. But there are problems with each of these signs. One can mistake a tapir footprint for that of a rhino, especially if the footprint is old or degraded. Dung, as shown by the genetic study, has also proven problematic. Wild pig wallows and rhino wallows look practically the same. And while rhinos are the only animals in the area that twist branches as they eat, it’s still possible to mistake a twisted branch for the existence of a rhino.A rhino wallows in the mud at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary — a behavior also shared by other local species. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.None of this is to say that the RPUs aren’t doing their jobs well; few people have more day-to-day, on-the-ground expertise with rhinos than RPU staff. Some of them have been protecting rhinos since the late 1990s, putting their lives on the line for a species they almost never see in the flesh.“It’s easy to distinguish rhino and tapir [footprints] and I believe our team … know how to distinguish [them],” said Inov Sectionov, the Indonesia program coordinator for the IRF.Still, humans make mistakes. And errors may become more common when monitoring a species that is barely there anymore.For example, what happened with the rhino dung that turned out to be tapir? Arief Rubianto, the manager of the RPUs in Sumatra, said rain during the collection period made it more difficult to tell the dung apart. “This is not the fault of the RPUs,” he said, noting that the team collected as much dung as they could in the hope of getting as many samples of rhino DNA as possible.Arief said RPUs are finding fewer rhino “signs” in Bukit Barisan, but he contends this doesn’t mean the rhino population has decreased, because RPUs have not found any signs of dead rhinos in recent years. Instead, he argues, encroachment, fires and other human activities have driven rhinos deeper into the park’s steep slopes — hardly prime habitat for a species that many believe probably preferred lowland forests and grasslands before humans wiped them out from those areas. He added the government has “not successfully handled” illegal activities in the parks.Arief claims there are at least 12 rhinos left in Bukit Barisan Selatan, including two calves this year, based on footprints. The population, he says, is “stable” but “very low.” If true, it may be enough to make up a viable population, assuming they are all capable of breeding (a 2015 report estimated a minimum of 15 rhinos would be needed for a viable population).But Arief’s estimate was the most optimistic I heard.last_img read more

Government revokes 406 mining permits in Indonesia’s East Kalimantan

first_imgCoal, Corruption, Energy, Environment, Environmental Law, Governance, Indonesia, Law, Law Enforcement, Mining, Rainforest Mining, Transparency Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Local authorities have revoked 406 coal-mining permits in East Kalimantan province, with another 403 permits to be revoked in the future.East Kalimantan is the heart of Indonesia’s coal-mining industry, with over half of the province’s land area allocated for mining concessions.The revocation is a part of a nationwide effort to stamp out irregularities in the the country’s mining sector, which has long been plagued by corruption, legal violations, and environmental and social damage. SAMARINDA, Indonesia — Officials in Indonesia’s coal-rich province of East Kalimantan have announced the revocation of more than 400 mining permits, as part of ongoing efforts to clean up the industry.A total of 406 mining business licenses, or IUPs, out of the 1,404 issued in East Kalimantan, in the Indonesian portion of Borneo, have been withdrawn by the provincial mining board. All but 12 of those revoked were deemed not “clean and clear,” meaning the companies failed to meet all legal requirements, including registration to pay taxes, land rent and other royalties.Another 403 permits will be revoked in the future, bringing the total to 809, said Rusmadi, the East Kalimantan government official leading a team tasked with review mining permits in the province.The move is a part of a nationwide effort to stamp out irregularities in the country’s mining industry, which has long been plagued by corruption, legal violations, and environmental and social damage.At the national level, these efforts are led by Indonesia’s anti-graft agency, the KPK, which in 2014 launched an investigation into the mining industry by examining the legality of permits issued in 12 provinces. The investigation revealed that 40 percent of the nearly 11,000 licenses issued in these provinces were not clean and clear.East Kalimantan, Indonesia’s coal-mining heartland, with an estimated 28 percent of the country’s reserves of the fossil fuel, is one of the provinces under scrutiny investigation. More than half of the province’s total land area has been allocated for mining concessions.While the revocation of problematic licenses represents some progress in cracking down on violators, activists with the East Kalimantan chapter of the Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam) say the government should have been more transparent in the process.“The information given [by the provincial government] has never been complete,” said Pradarma Rupang, a member of the network. “The names of the companies whose permits have been revoked and the types of violations [they were cited for] were never announced to the public.”Jatam has been trying to get the East Kalimantan government to disclose the names of companies whose permits are being revoked, submitting a formal request in May. To date, the provincial government has still not released the information.Pradarma said Jatam had found irregularities in the revocation process. “There’s a strong indication, based on our findings, that the East Kalimantan government is trying to reinstate some mining permits that have expired and are non-clean and clear,” he said.He also said a total of 415 permits should have been revoked, instead of the 406 announced by the authorities. “The question is, who owns these nine [missing] permits?” he said.Rusmadi, who also serves as the provincial secretary, the number two official in the local government, declined to answer questions regarding these allegations.In light of the lack of either a response or any transparency from the provincial government, Jatam has filed a complaint with the Indonesian Ombudsman, accusing East Kalimantan Governor Awang Faroek Ishak of violating the 2009 Public Service Law, which regulates how government agencies release information and respond to complaints.Jatam has also criticized the local government for failing to address the issue of abandoned open-pit coal mines scattered throughout the province, which have claimed the lives of at least 27 people, mostly children.Text: Anton Septian/Tempo. Data: East Kalimantan Office of Mines and Energy, Directorate General of Legal Administration of the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights.Pradarma said the government should not only revoke the mining permits of the companies responsible, but also hold them liable for the rehabilitation of abandoned mining sites, as required under Indonesia’s mining regulations. The law says companies must begin reclaiming mines within 30 days of ceasing operations. In practice, some companies simply walk away from their mines, leaving deep pits, which fill up with chemical-laden water.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Nov. 6, 2017.Banner image: Coal mined in East Kalimantan being transported by river barge. Almost half of of Indonesia’s coal production comes from the province. Photo by Tommy Apriando for Mongabay-Indonesia.last_img read more

Mitchells bowl tight for NZ to stifle Australia in World T20

first_imgDHARAMSALA, India (AP):Mitchell McClenaghan and Mitchell Santner shared crucial strikes and five wickets as New Zealand defeated Australia by eight runs for a second consecutive win in Group Two of the World Twenty20 yesterday.Spinners were the star turn for New Zealand when they beat India by 47 runs in their first game, but pace bowler McClenaghan, who replaced Nathan McCullum, complemented them as New Zealand emerged with a strong reputation midway into their Super 10 engagements.Left-armer McClenaghan finished with 3-17 and accounted for Shane Watson (13), Mitchell Marsh (24) and Ashton Agar (9). Left-arm spinner Santner followed up his four-for against India with 2-30, getting rid of big names David Warner and Steven Smith.”It was nice to perform like that, but it was a collective effort,” McClenaghan said after being named Man of the Match. “The spinners were fantastic and got us back in the game. It’s nice to show some teams that we can play in these conditions.”Australia were 100-4 after 15 overs, and relatively cruising, but collapsed in losing five wickets for 34 runs, four of those wickets in the last two overs.RUN OUTOpener Usman Khawaja started with a flourish in driving and pulling balls to the boundaries, but his 38 off 27 balls – with six fours – did not take Australia far, as he was run out; and Santner soon took his pair.Glenn Maxwell used the reverse-sweep to some effect for a useful 22, and Marsh tried hard with a valiant 24, but Australia lost control and were left to get 19 runs by the time Corey Anderson (2-29) came on to bowl the last over.”I thought 150 was par,” Australia captain Smith said. “Their spinners bowled extremely well and we didn’t respond well. We lost wickets in clumps and couldn’t get any partnerships together.”Earlier, left-arm pace bowler James Faulkner and off-spinner Glenn Maxwell returned identical figures of 3-0-18-2 to help restrict the Kiwis on a slow pitch.New Zealand got off to a brisk start as opener Martin Guptill struck 39 off 27 balls with two fours and four sixes. He put on 61 with captain Kane Williamson before he was caught by Maxwell at long on off Faulkner. Williamson followed him five runs later as he fell to Maxwell for 24 off 20 with four fours.Grant Elliott (27) and Colin Munro (23) chipped in with useful efforts to help put up a fighting score.”We were fortunate to play on two wickets so similar,” Williamson said. “We adopted similar tactics.”last_img read more