Nepal tests fencing approach to protect farms and elephants

first_imgWith people and wildlife co-existing ever more closely, conflict situations often arise. What to do? Shooting animals is a frequent solution. In Nepal, an alternative approach is tried.The Himalayan Tiger Foundation is working with the National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), WWF-Nepal and the authorities of Bardiya National Park to test a new approach for keeping elephants and people separated.An electric fence has been developed that should stop elephants from raiding people’s crops and houses, but allow other wildlife, people and cattle to pass through unhindered.Fences only work where communities support and maintain them. Getting this support is not easy. Co-financing schemes appear necessary to create the required sense of ownership from communities. “We are not angry with the elephant and know that we need to protect it, but we also need to protect ourselves”.This is a brave statement by Kaushala Budha, a Nepali farmer in the Patabhar hamlet, whose house had been nearly destroyed by a raiding elephant the previous night. I had expected more anger and a call for revenge, but no such thing. “If the government would help us, we would pack our bags and leave”, she says. Not too surprising because last night’s raid on her house was the 6th time in a year.Kaushala Budha, in the center, standing in front of her damaged house. Photo Erik MeijaardFor the past week I have been working in the Bardiya National Park in western Nepal. The Himalayan Tiger Foundation (NTF) invited me to come and help them think through their program on human-elephant encounters. NTF works here with National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) and WWF-Nepal, advising them on improving park management and ultimately increasing the abundance of key species that occur, like tiger, rhinos, elephants, swamp deer, and a range of other exciting species.This time, we are here to address two issues: Testing a new system of electric fencing, and starting a grassland improvement program to increase palatable grasses to get more deer and antelopes and ultimately more tigers.Human-elephant encounters are costly to the community. A recent study showed that the total yearly elephant damage in the 5,000 ha project area is about US$ 35,000 – 50,000 in crop losses and damage to houses.Community meeting to discuss the elephant fence. Sitting in the foreground is Amar Budha whose house had been raided just a few hours ago. Photo Erik Meijaard.But the losses are not just financial; they are also emotional. The Budha family that I talked to had a very scary night. One adult male elephant walked through their gate in the middle of the night when everyone was fast asleep. It pulled down one wall in search of food. Then it moved to a second house, and ripped open the wall right next to where the family was sleeping with their children.Everyone was in a panic, they tried to light fires and fireworks to chase off the elephant, but the animal paid no attention. It eventually found their rice and lentil storage and spent about an hour feeding before finally moving back to the forest. The randomness of these attacks and the uncertainty who it will affect makes it extra hard for people to cope. Why us and not our neighbors?“That’s was our food for the next two months”, Kaushala explained. Amar Budha, her father-in-law, just stood there and cried. He explains how scary the attack was, how he shouted and prayed, and tried to comfort his grandchildren. “But there is nothing you can do to stop a hungry elephant.”So, what to do? This community is living in the buffer zone of a national park. It is meant both for people and wildlife. Excluding all wildlife from the area would basically mean losing its conservation function. The Nepali authorities recognize this. They pay compensation to affected communities; 1,500 Nepali rupees (about USD 15) to the Budha family, for example. That is not much for what they lost, but the government reasons that this reflects the reality of living next door to wildlife, a standpoint I very much admire. Yes, people are important, but the park was set up to protect wildlife. This wildlife and nature attracts significant tourism which generates some 7% of Nepal’s GDP.NTNC has been working with the buffer zone community for many years now. There have been social surveys to understand the conflict issues. Which animals are considered the biggest problem? Leopards come into the area and kill pigs, dogs, and goats. Rhinos walk through and feed on crops and have killed people. Tigers rarely enter and are not considered a major issue. But by far the biggest source of concern appears to be the elephant. So, keeping elephants out of fields and people’s houses and fields is a key objective, especially because the elephant population in Bardiya National Park is expected to increase, as a result of effective anti-poaching measures.Discussing the demonstration fence with community leaders and elephant specialist Pruthu Fernando from Sri Lanka. WWF tries to involve international experts in the process to maximize the likelihood of success. Photo Erik MeijaardThis is where the Himalayan Tiger Foundation came in. Together with scientists from the University of Wageningen in the Netherlands they have developed an experimental electric fence. It uses a single live wire, instead of multiple wires, at a height of 180 cm that allows people and cattle, but also deer, tigers, and rhinos to walk underneath it. The idea is to stop the much taller elephants from going through but not other wildlife. Hopefully it also prevents people from cutting fences because they can pass through unhindered. It’s an excellent idea. Whether it will work will largely depend on how well the scientists understand elephants and even more importantly how well they understand communities.The bottom line is, communities make fences work (or fail). Working electric fences are only possible if there is full buy-in from communities. If not everyone supports the fence and is willing to maintain it, it will rapidly break down. People cut wires to let their cattle through. Critical parts like solar panels and batteries are not serviced or kept clean. Or children may remove parts from the fence for a little dare. And like kids, elephants are curious and smart. Once they work out that a fence doesn’t work properly, they will go through them like a knife through butter. Elephants are tremendously strong and without electricity a fence becomes an irrelevant obstacle they will simply walk through.Good fences aren’t cheap. The total costs for a 28.5 km fence are about US$ 85,000, or about twice the costs of the annual damage from elephants in the area. Of these fencing costs about 15% is funded by WWF, and another 15% by the government, specifically through the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC), who manage the park. It is crucial that the remainder is paid by the community. Such co-financing creates a sense of community ownership and hopefully a greater sense of responsibility for maintaining the fence. A financing model from HTF indicates that each household in the area needs to make an annual payment of about US$ 5.The challenge is that the costs of elephant conflicts are mostly born by the poorest members in the community. They live on the periphery closest to the forest edge. They suffer the most damage. So it becomes a matter of solidarity. Do the richer people in the relatively safe areas in the center want to pay to help the poorer community members reduce their problem. Tricky stuff, especially because other electric fences have been tried in the past, and, for a variety of reasons, have not worked.Discussing the possible locations of the test fence in the Bardiya National Park. Photo Erik Meijaard.So, in the end it was decided to first build a small test fence for an area of 0.25 hectare with a lot of tasty elephant snacks inside. If that effectively keeps out elephants, step two will be to establish 12 km of fence around the most affected communities to further test the design. Can it keep elephants out and can the community maintain it? If all these experiments go well, ultimately the area will be fully surrounded by 28.5 km of good fences.Where wildlife and people meet tricky situations often develop and solutions aren’t easy. But I admire the attitude of both the government institutions and communities here. Everyone seems to accept that wildlife and people will have to learn to live next to each other, and everyone is constructively trying to work out how this can be done. So the old proverb “good fences make good neighbors” could eventually become true in the case of the elephants and the people of Bardiya.No one ever thought conservation was going to be easy. Processes take time to implement and fast-track solutions rarely work. The job of nature conservation is also never done and conservation management needs to continue in perpetuity. My visit to Nepal gives me hope that some countries are starting to work out solutions for how people and wildlife can co-exist on an ever more densely populated Earth.Video. Getting up and close with a tusker in Bardiya National ParkErik Meijaard coordinates the Borneo Futures initiative. Follow him @emeijaard.Disclosure: The Himalayan Tiger Foundation paid for Meijaard’s travel costs. Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Conservation, Conservation Technology, Elephants, Environment, Fences, human-elephant conflict, Wildtech last_img read more

Protected species in Gulf of Mexico could take decades to recover from Deepwater Horizon oil spill

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Deepwater Horizon oil spill killed thousands of marine mammals and sea turtles in the Gulf, according to findings detailed in a special issue of the journal Endangered Species Research, published in January, comprised of 20 studies that collectively represent more than five years’-worth of data collection and analysis by scientists with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and their partners.The research was performed as part of a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), a process required under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 in which NOAA investigates the types of injuries to wildlife caused by an oil spill, determines the number of animals that were harmed, and develops a restoration plan designed to address the primary threats to impacted species.In a statement, NOAA offered this succinct summation of the results of the studies: “The research indicates that populations of several marine mammal and sea turtle species will take decades to rebound. Significant habitat restoration in the region will also be needed.” Research released last month suggested that the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster and oil spill caused $17.2 billion in damages to the Gulf of Mexico’s natural resources — and a slew of other recent studies provide even more detail on just how severe those impacts were for many of the protected marine mammal and sea turtle species found in the Gulf.What started as a blowout at an ultra-deepwater well operated by British oil major BP on April 20, 2010 led to an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig and ultimately the largest offshore oil spill in United States history. The well would not be successfully capped for another 87 days, by which time approximately 3.19 million barrels (or 134 million gallons) of oil had spewed into the Gulf of Mexico. That oil contaminated more than 112,000 square kilometers (over 43,200 square miles) of surface waters and fouled 2,100 kilometers (a little over 1,300 miles) of shoreline in five states.The Deepwater Horizon oil spill also killed thousands of marine mammals and sea turtles in the Gulf, according to findings detailed in a special issue of the journal Endangered Species Research published in January, comprised of 20 studies that collectively represent more than five years’-worth of data collection and analysis by scientists with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and their partners.“This extensive oiling contaminated vital foraging, migratory, and breeding habitats of protected marine species (e.g. sea turtles and marine mammals) at the surface, in the water column, and on the ocean bottom throughout the northern [Gulf of Mexico],” the editors of the special issue write in an overview paper.In a statement, NOAA offered this succinct summation of the results of the studies: “The research indicates that populations of several marine mammal and sea turtle species will take decades to rebound. Significant habitat restoration in the region will also be needed.”Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, prepares to clean an oiled Kemp’s ridley turtle. Veterinarians and scientists from NOAA, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, and other partners working under the Unified Command captured heavily-oiled young turtles 20 to 40 miles offshore as part of ongoing animal rescue and rehabilitation efforts. Photo Credit: NOAA and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.NOAA scientists used a variety of research methods for the studies, including surveys conducted from the air and by boat, recoveries and examinations of stranded animals, satellite tracking of live animals (while the spill was ongoing and afterward), and veterinary assessments. The research was performed as part of a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), a process required under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 in which NOAA investigates the types of injuries to wildlife caused by an oil spill, determines the number of animals that were harmed, and develops a restoration plan designed to address the primary threats to impacted species.The researchers found that thousands of the Gulf’s protected species were exposed to oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill throughout their habitats. “Marine mammals and sea turtles may have been exposed to the oil by inhalation, aspiration, ingesting contaminated sediment, water, or prey, or by absorbing contaminants through their skin,” according to NOAA.Some 22 species of marine mammals call the northern Gulf of Mexico home, and all are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The scientists determined that Deepwater Horizon oil contaminated every type of habitat that the Gulf of Mexico’s marine mammals rely on, from the coastal seagrasses favored by manatees to the estuarine, nearshore, and offshore habitats frequented by whales and dolphins. Exposure to this oil caused “a wide range of adverse health effects,” NOAA reports, including organ damage and reproductive failure, leading to “the largest and longest marine mammal unusual mortality event ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico.”Increased incidence of dolphin strandings in the northern Gulf of Mexico for several years after the Deepwater Horizon spill supported the evidence of reduced survival and reproductive rates for the surviving dolphin populations, the researchers found. Health impacts associated with oil exposure suffered by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Barataria Bay, Louisiana reportedly led to a 50 percent decline in their numbers, while Mississippi Sound bottlenose dolphin abundance declined by 62 percent.Bottlenose dolphin with oil adhered to the head, July 2010. The oil spill contaminated prime marine mammal habitat in the estuarine, nearshore, and offshore waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Photo taken under research permit. Photo courtesy of NOAA.Five species of sea turtles, all of which are protected under the Endangered Species Act, can also be found in the Gulf, which provides important habitat for the turtles’ feeding, migration, and reproduction. The scientists determined that four species — green turtles (Chelonia mydas), hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata), Kemp’s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii), and loggerheads (Caretta caretta) — were exposed to Deepwater Horizon oil in their habitats in the open ocean, across the continental shelf, and in nearshore and coastal areas, including beaches where the turtles nest.Researchers concluded that as much as 20 percent of the juvenile Kemp’s ridley sea turtles that were in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill died of oil exposure. Some members of the fifth sea turtle species in the Gulf, leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea), were also likely killed as a result of exposure to Deepwater Horizon oil, the researchers added.These findings helped inform the $8.8 billion for natural resource damage included in the $20 billion settlement with BP approved by a U.S. federal judge last year, the largest environmental settlement in the nation’s history. The funds will be used for a variety of projects aimed at decreasing and mitigating the numerous threats faced by marine mammals and sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico in order to allow for the restoration of their population numbers.“Sea turtles and marine mammals fulfill unique ecological roles as long-lived, large-bodied animals that move through several habitats during their lives, and they are often focal species in assessments of marine ecosystem health and function,” the editors of the special issue of Endangered Species Researcj write in the overview paper.“Considering their long lifespans and generation time — including slow maturation times and low reproductive rates — and wide distributions over which resource availability and impacts of threats can vary greatly, the [NOAA scientists and partners] concluded that full recovery of [Gulf of Mexico] sea turtle and marine mammal populations… from these losses will take decades and will require extensive restoration efforts.”Juvenile Kemp’s ridley sea turtle oiled in the Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010. Photo Credit: Blair Witherington, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.CITATIONSBishop, R.C., Boyle, K.J., Carson, R.T., Chapman, D., Hanemann, W.M., Kanninen, B., Kopp, R.J., Krosnick, J., List, J., Meade, N., Paterson, R., Presser, S., Smith, V.K., Tourangeau, R., Welsh, M., Wooldridge, J.M., De Bell, M., Donovan, C., Konopka, M., & Scherer, N. (2017). Putting a value on injuries to natural assets: The BP oil spill. Science 356(6335). doi:10.1126/science.aam8124Wallace, B. P., Brosnan, T., McLamb, D., Rowles, T., Ruder, E., Schroeder, B., … & Wehner, D. (2017). Effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on protected marine species. Endangered Species Research, 33, 1-7. doi:10.3354/esr00789 Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Dolphins, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Offshore Drilling, Oil Spills, Research, Sea Turtles, Turtles, Wildlife last_img read more

Temer guts Brazil’s slavery law, to the applause of elite ruralists

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Illegal Timber Trade, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Grabbing, Mining, Modern-day slavery, Protests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Ranching, Saving The Amazon, Slavery, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Brazil has about 155,000 people working in conditions analogous to slavery, many used by elite ruralists who have become wealthy via environmental crime. Slave labor, for example, is often used in the Amazon to keep illegal deforestation and illicit agribusiness hidden and off the books.President Temer has issued a decree — known as a portaria — narrowing the definition of slavery. Holding people in economic servitude, in conditions analogous to slavery, is no longer illegal. Now slaves must be held against their will, and two government officials must catch the slaveholder in the act.The easing of the slavery law, experts say, is Temer’s way of rewarding the bancada ruralista, the agribusiness lobby, which includes about 40 percent of the Congress and continues to support Temer and to reject on-going rounds of corruption charges against the president.Outrage over the weakening of the slavery law is widespread in Brazil and abroad. NOTE: this story was updated on 10-25-17 to report that Brazil’s Supreme Court (STF) has temporarily suspended implementation of Temer’s slavery decree until an STF ruling can be made. A wealthy Brazilian family in Rio de Janeiro, at home with their slaves, as portrayed in 1839. The severe economic divide between elite ruralists and the slaves they profit from is just as wide today, say experts. Painting by Jean-Baptiste Debret in the public domainOver the last year the Michel Temer government has rolled back many progressive environmental, indigenous and land policies, achieved over three decades, to please the ruralist lobby in Congress, upon which it is dependent for its political survival. Yet none of these significant setbacks has provoked the furore that erupted after Temer’s recent decision to change the legislation dealing with slave labor.On 16 October the Labor Ministry issued a decree (Portaria N° 1129/2017) that altered the way slave labor is defined and prosecuted in Brazil. Under the new rules, it is no longer enough for workers to be laboring for many hours in degrading and inhumane conditions or to be paid only in food. From now on, for workers to be considered to be working “in conditions analogous to slavery,” employers must deny them the freedom to come and go.Moreover, for an employer to be found guilty of slave labor, a police officer, accompanied by a Labor Ministry official, must catch the person in the act of denying workers this freedom — almost an administrative impossibility in remote settings like the Amazon, where much slavery occurs to hide environmental crime.“It’s a legal absurdity, a monstrosity” exclaimed Luiz Eduardo Bojart, a prosecutor in the Labor Public Ministry (MPT) — an independent branch of government dealing exclusively with labor questions. It is taking the country back, he said, “to the situation two centuries ago when slaves were held without the freedom to come and go, when there were senzalas (slave quarters), neckbands, shackles and whips.”Since the mid-1990s, Brazil has won considerable praise internationally for its name-and-shame anti-slavery policy. Labor Ministry officials carried out surprise raids, liberating 50,000 people trapped in slavery between 1996 and 2013. While few employers faced prison sentences, their placement on a “dirty list,” making it nearly impossible to obtain bank loans, has proved effective.However, over the last year under Temer, the implementation of this highly effective strategy has ground to a virtual halt, because of lack of funding. The new legislation will, critics say, now allow ruralists to increase their use of slave labor to cut, and conceal, costs within their illegal logging operations, cattle ranches, soy plantations and other endeavors, especially in remote areas such as the Amazon.An official from the Brazilian Ministry of Labor investigating a slave labor case. Temer’s slavery decree, which dramatically narrows the definition of slavery, will make it far more difficult to prosecute slavery cases. Photo courtesy of the Ministry of LaborTemer’s easing of slavery laws is extremely galling for many Brazilians, particularly as the problem is still very serious. According to figure published by the Walk Free Foundation, Brazil currently has about 155,000 people working in conditions analogous to slavery. In March, Mongabay and Repórter Brasil reported on how U.S. based companies, such as Walmart and Lowes, bought timber from Brazilian traders that sourced forest products from Amazon sawmills where loggers worked under slave labor conditions.At times, the very archaic and the very modern are found side-by-side in Brazilian business practices. Some companies utilize high-tech methods in parts of their production chain, while employing slave labor to carry out unskilled and unpleasant tasks. A case in point: a wealthy land thief in the Amazon used sophisticated technology to work out just how much forest he could clear without being detected by monitoring satellites, while simultaneously using slave labor to cut the trees.The response to Temer’s slavery decree was swift. On 18 October, entities representing labor judges, labor prosecutors, labor inspectors and labor lawyers issued a press release calling the portaria “illegal.” These experts called for the immediate revocation of Temer’s decree, noting that it was “directly violating” international conventions of which Brazil is a signatory. Those signing the press release included Guilherme Guimarães Feliciano, from the National Association of Labor Justice Judges (ANAMATRA) and Angelo Fabiano Farias da Costa, from the National Association of Labor Prosecutors (ANPT).These experts also warned that Brazil could face “international sanctions.” Indeed, Heidi Hautala, a Finnish Member of the European Parliament, told the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that she and her colleagues could not “accept that products produced by laborers working in slave-like conditions be imported” into the European Union.It is believed that most of the estimated 155,000 Brazilian workers, who accept terrible working conditions analogous to slavery, do so not because they cannot leave their work, but because they cannot find better jobs. Therefore, Temer’s new definition of slavery will drastically reduce, with the sweep of a pen, the official slavery statistics. In fact, the MPT told Reuters that the portaria would mean that 506 of the 706 cases of alleged slavery currently under investigation would be halted.A photo of enslaved Amazon Indians during the rubber boom of the early 1900s. This photo, though taken in the Peruvian Amazon, offers an accurate portrayal of atrocities committed in Brazil during that era. Photo by Walter Hardenberg in the public domainDespite the outcry, some sectors welcomed the change. The Agricultural Parliamentary Front (FPA), the mouthpiece of the ruralist lobby in Congress, expressed support for the portaria. In a press statement the FPA said that the new legislation would introduce clarity, for at the moment “the lack of specific criteria for forced labor, exhausting days and degrading work conditions, allows government officials to apply different criteria, creating legal uncertainty in the sector.”Agriculture minister Blairo Maggi also welcomed the new portaria saying that it would help to correct “the current confusion about what is and what isn’t slave labor.”Senator Cidinho Santos, from the small, right-wing Republic Party, said that the new measure would prevent employers being punished unfairly. “Sometimes the employer provides workers with chemical toilets but they [the workers] prefer to use the forest. Or he provides a canteen but the workers prefer to eat with their hands sitting on a tarpaulin.”The ruralists have been calling for a change in the legal definition of slave labor for years, if only because some of them are on the ”dirty list,” published every six months by the Ministry of Labor and Employment and the Special Human Rights Secretariat.Some on the “dirty list” are important donors to Brazil’s political parties. A study carried out by Repórter Brasil found that, of the 490 names that figured on the “dirty list” between 2002 and 2012, 77 had made donations to political parties. The main beneficiaries were the PTB (Brazilian Labour Party) and the PMDB (Brazilian Democratic Movement Party), the largest party in Brazil, to which Temer belongs.Until now the Ministry of Labor and Employment has used technical criteria to compile this list. Now it will be the Minister of Labor who decides when — or whether — to publish the list at all.An overseer beats a slave. While Brazil abolished slavery in 1888, an estimated 155,000 people are held in “conditions analogous to slavery” today, many in remote regions such as the Amazon where economic hardship forces laborers to take work offering little reward in heinous conditions that are dangerous and unhealthy in the extreme. Painting by Jean-Baptiste Debret in the public domainXavier Plassat, coordinator of the Pastoral Land Commission’s Campaign Against Slave Labor, told Mongabay that it was very clear why the government announced the new measure when it did: “This portaria benefits the particular interests of groups for whom modern slavery is a source of profit, and whose support the government needs, particularly at the moment when new legal proceedings against the president [regarding corruption charges] have to be approved or rejected in the Chamber of Deputies.” According to Plassat, the measure is highly inconsistent. For instance, he says, “According to the decree, there’s nothing wrong for a worker to sleep with animals and drink dirty water as long as he isn’t watched over by armed guards.”Federal deputy Alessando Molon, from the Rede party, will try and have the portaria overthrown by Congress. He told the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper: “Temer seems to have gone beyond all limits. To bury the work to combat slave labor in exchange for saving his skin in the Chamber of Deputies is scandalous, apart from the brutal impact it will have on thousands of Brazilians.”The decree will also make it harder to protect the environment. Illegal forest clearance and illegal logging depend on slave labor, for they occur in a hidden, black market economy. In many cases, it was only possible to stop these activities by arresting those who were using slave labor to cut the trees — a crime that can be more readily demonstrated and does not require long legal proceedings.Under Temer’s measure these environmental criminals will largely have carte blanche to carry on with their destructive activities.Time and again, analysts in Brazil have said that Temer has gone too far and now, surely, he will be stopped. In this case, although the situation is still unclear, it seems the strength of the public reaction may be bearing results. Temer told the Poder360 website on 20 October that he would probably introduce changes in the portaria suggested by Attorney General Raquel Dodge. Whether these alterations will satisfy the outraged labor judges and labor inspectors is unknown.STORY UPDATE 10/25/17: Rosa Weber, a minister in Brazil’s Supreme Court (STF), issued a ruling on 24 October to suspend temporarily the portaria issued by the Labor Ministry that established new, much more restrictive criteria for slave labor. The STF minister was responding to an action brought by Rede Sustentabilidade, a small political party set up by former environment minister Marina Silva. The Supreme Court suspension means that the Labor Ministry will be unable to implement the portaria until a definitive ruling has been made about its legality.The ruling came after a flurry of protests over the new portaria, including recommendations sent by both the Public Federal Ministry (MPF) and the Public Labor Ministry (MPT) that the portaria should be revoked. In her ruling, the STF minister said that the “extremely restrictive criteria are not coherent with Brazil’s judicial order or with international agreements that the country has signed.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

COP23: Leaders vie for protection of ‘incredibly important’ African peatland

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis carbon, Climate Change, Community Forestry, Environment, Featured, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Communities, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Logging, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Swamps, Tropical Forests The presence of the world’s biggest tropical peatland was recently confirmed in Central Africa. It is the size of England and straddles the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and the Republic of Congo (ROC).However, conservationists and scientists worry it may be at risk from logging and development. They caution its destruction could release “vast amounts” of carbon emissions. Others say the threats are overblown.Conservation leaders and representatives gathered this week at COP23 in Bonn, Germany, say protections could exist through REDD+ projects that could give local communities management rights and provide financial incentives for leaving the peat forest intact. BONN, Germany – A few weeks ago, international scientists, government officials and forest advocates visiting a remote community in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) confirmed the presence of one of the world’s largest and most important carbon sinks – a vast and deep peatland the size of England.Here at the 23rd United Nations Climate Summit, COP23, where European and African nations gave presentations over the past two weeks regarding the overlooked importance of peatlands for carbon sequestration, recent word of the huge finding on the border of DRC and the Republic of Congo made the rounds.“It’s phenomenal and it’s incredibly important,” said Bronson Griscom, director of forest science for The Nature Conservancy. “Most forests max out when it comes to carbon stocks. But wetlands and peatlands don’t max out. They keep storing carbon in the soil, decade after decade, century after century. These are the most carbon dense systems on earth. In terms of a hotspot for conservation – biodiversity and carbon storage – it’s a no brainer to protect it.”That, of course, is the biggest concern now that this 155,000 square kilometers of peatland has been located in two poor African countries desperate for development.he recently discovered peatland is believed to be the largest tropical peatland in the world. Image courtesy of Dargie et al., 2017.Scientists are racing to learn more about the peatland as loggers move to fell and drain the forests above it to make way for roads and developments like palm oil plantations. Meanwhile, local communities are hoping for greater protection of the region as government officials try to drum up more support for conservation initiatives here at COP23.Protection a challenge but possibleFloribert Botamba, a World Wildlife Fund project coordinator for REDD+ projects in DRC, said in an exclusive interview with Mongabay that he believed the enormous peatland in the province of Équateur qualifies for protection. However, he downplayed its threats.“People think there is a risk from the logging activities, but the peatland is in a swamp area,” Botamba said. “To log in a swamp area costs a lot, so the risk is a little bit lower than if it was in a dry area.”The risk, though, still exists. And while swampy areas may be costly to log, there is precedent for peatland development in other places such as Indonesia where massive draining of peat swamps for plantations led to the country’s 2015 haze crisis. The devastating months-long event is blamed for the deaths of as many as 100,000 people and released 15 to 20 million tons of carbon per day – exceeding the average daily emissions of the entire U.S. economy.“Peatlands are really good at holding carbon over a long time,” said Jason Funk, associate director of land use with the Center for Carbon Capture. “But when those areas are disturbed, all that carbon can be released very quickly. And because it’s been building up for thousands of years, it can be vast amounts of emissions.”Peatlands can be converted for human use by digging drainage canals. Photo taken in Indonesia.Once drained and dry, peat is highly combustible. And once ignited, fires on peatlands can be difficult or impossible to control. Photo taken in Indonesia.With global carbon emissions set to hit an all-time high this year through energy generation, the transportation sector and deforestation, conservationists say clearing of the peatland could thwart efforts to reduce emissions and slow the rate of global warming.“If folks got in there and started disturbing that area in DRC, the carbon could be released, and it could turn to methane, which is far worse than CO2,” Funk said. “In Indonesia, a similar thing happened. Peatlands were seen there as wastelands. No one had title to them or was doing anything on the land. When there was pressure to grow palm oil, that’s where it went. And the emissions were tremendous.”Griscom at The Nature Conservancy said often on lands filled with carbon and natural resources, the argument for protection loses out to job creation and company profits.“But when you are talking about tropical peat systems,” he said, “it’s one of the few cases where it’s very hard to see a better use of that land than its natural state – given the incredible ecosystem services provided by that natural system.”Botamaba with WWF said there is a possible way to protect the peatlands in DRC while providing opportunities for the people who live around them.Community rights and REDD+“The community there needs land rights,” Botamaba said. “The province needs to give them land rights through the community forest process. The community can request part of the forest block to be managed by themselves. You make that request from the province, then the national ministry will evaluate the request. After that, the provincial governor will decide. That’s a long process. But we [WWF] are doing that in other communities and we will help in this [peatland] area, too.”Given his expertise, Botamba said he believes the peatland could possibly qualify for REDD+ financial incentives.“In the REDD process, we have five principles in which to qualify for funds: climate, biodiversity, community rights, livelihood and finance. To do a REDD program, you have to make sure you include all five.“If you do community forest management, you improve the climate by holding carbon. You increase the biodiversity because most of the wren population in the country is in that area. If you are paying the community to take care of such an area without disturbing it, you are improving their livelihood.“And by going through the community forest process, you improve the land rights and that goes toward community rights. Ideally, logging won’t appear in that area because you have the rights. It has to be a transformational opportunity that will bring other finance. All of this is possible with a place and project like this.”African dwarf crocodiles (Osteolaemus tetraspis) have a range that comprises the peatland, and are listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN.The big question, Botamba agreed, is money. Will these peatlands actually qualify for REDD+ financial incentives, and if so, how much and when will it received? If it doesn’t qualify, will private donors step forward to help preserve this enormous carbon sink and keep the community or province from monetizing the land for logging or extraction?“It’s a good thing to find a new thing, but who is ready to support it, finance it?” Botamba asked. “And how can money be used to help improve the country and the community with green development instead of regular development like building roads for logging that harms the environment?”Daniel Blattner, a former logger turned environmental entrepreneur from the DRC, said he is eager to help identify the resources, like REDD+, to protect the newly identified peatlands.“That’s why I came to COP23,” he said in an interview with Mongabay. “We have millions of tons of carbon without a market for it. We are in the process of converting our REDD carbon tonnage to ‘jurisdictionally nested REDD’ projects so that they will be able to be sold in the compliance market. Right now, though, the price of carbon is low and the market isn’t very robust. We hope that will change.”Justin Catanoso is a regular contributor to Mongabay and a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, USA. Follow him on twitter @jcatanoso FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Arellano ousts UP, books Final 4 berth

first_imgLATEST STORIES Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene In the other match, College of Saint Benilde finally notched a win, shaking off a slow start and beating Technological Insitute of the Philippines, 18-25, 25-19, 25-22, 25-22, to finish with a 1-4 card.The Lady Engineers closed out with a 0-5 slate.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparc MOST READ Ateneo runs streak to 6, La Salle rebounds Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ DAY6 is for everybody Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Arellano’s Andrea Marzan scores on a hit against UP’s Marian Buitre during their duel for the second semifinal slot in Group B of the PVL Collegiate Conference.Arellano U doused University of the Philippines’ grit and used a dominant fifth-set performance to hammer out a 22-25, 25-10, 25-19, 32-34, 15-3 decision to clinch the second semifinal berth in Group B of the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference in San Juan Saturday.The Lady Chiefs racked up five straight points to start the decisive set and cooled whatever momentum the Lady Maroons built in an edge-of-your-seat fourth set to seal the win in an hour and 48 minutes.ADVERTISEMENT How to help the Taal evacuees In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide View comments OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. UP, which stubbornly fought off elimination with that fourth-set win, lost their sting after ace hitter Justine Dorog left the game with a knee injury before the fifth set.Arellano thus joined Adamson as Group B semifinalists after notching its fourth win in five games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogIt was a sorry setback for the Diliman-based UP, which looked headed to the semifinals after that dramatic fourth-set win. The Lady Maroons closed out their campaign with a 3-2 mark.Jovielyn Prado led Arellano with 26 hits. It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up Read Nextlast_img read more

Maradona says he’s well after being treated at World Cup

first_imgTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town He had earlier been seen reacting emotionally to the game and showing a middle-finger salute when Argentina scored. TV footage also showed Maradona with his eyes closed for part of the game.Maradona says he was dizzy and his “neck hurt a lot,” so he was examined at the stadium.Writing on Instagram underneath a picture of himself with medical staff, Maradona says “I was checked by a doctor and he recommended me to go home before the second half, but I wanted to stay because we were risking it all. How could I leave?”ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihan Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew READ: Concern over Maradona after health scare in Argentina World Cup thriller MOST READ Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Peruvians hope not to wait 36 years for next World Cup trip Argentina former soccer star Diego Maradona waves to the fans ahead of the group D match between Argentina and Nigeria, at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the St. Petersburg Stadium in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)MOSCOW — Argentine football great Diego Maradona says he is well after requiring medical treatment at a World Cup game in Russia.Footage posted on social media showed Maradona apparently disoriented and being helped to climb stairs at Argentina’s 2-1 win over Nigeria on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Guyana committed to eliminating HIV/AIDS by 2030 – Dr Norton

first_imgGuyana stands in solidarity with the rest of the world as it takes on the challenge of completely eliminating the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/ Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic by 2030, according to Minister of Health Dr George Norton.Dr Norton made this commitment while addressing a United Nations (UN) High Level Meeting on ending AIDS in New York on Wednesday.Noting that Guyana will spare no effort in working to reduce the number of victims and deaths, the minister shed light on the 2016 Political Declaration which his ministry will implement as a guide to end the epidemic.With the factors to curb the prevalence of the virus at arms’ length, Norton assured that ending the AIDS epidemic as a public threat by 2030 is definitely within the country’s reach. To this extent, he added that a national stakeholder’s response would be essential, as well as the use of resources and a change in the course of action over the years.“This will depend on the strong solidarity and shared commitment of all stakeholders in the fight against HIV/AIDS, and the mobilisation of the requisite resources to sustain our common efforts at all levels. It will require a radical change of the trajectory over the next five years, recognising the multidimensional nature of the challenge,” the minister reminded.Norton noted that the Guyana Health Vision 2020 has been serving its intended function as a framework for the national health response.Present within this framework, he added, is the HIVision 2020, which can be credited for the reduction of deaths due to HIV/AIDS as well as the prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT).Dr Norton explained that the vision emphasises on major principles that are to be considered when fighting a virus as widespread and devastating as HIV/AIDS. He mentioned that the government, on realising this, had crafted the vision under these guidelines.“Its goal is to reduce the social and economic impact of HIV and AIDS on individuals and communities and ultimately the development of the country. It focuses on five priority areas: Coordination; Prevention; Treatment, Care and Support; Integration and Strategic Information,” the Minister stated.As the HIVision has become integrated into Guyana’s national response to the virus, the results thus far have been in sync with the government’s target, according to Dr Norton.According to statistics, Guyana had recorded 3.4 per cent of its population had been living with the virus in 2004, which had then reduced to 1.4 per cent in 2013.In 2014, the cases further decreased with 751 persons being infected as opposed to 758 in 2013. However, these figures were at its worst in 2009 when a total of 1176 cases were recorded.“This achievement can be attributed to a combination of factors, chief among them being actions taken at the policy and programmatic levels to realise a comprehensive approach to ending the epidemic locally. An increase in access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has also been instrumental in our success,” the minister stated. In addition to these factors, the establishment on programmes within the region with more emphasis on youth involvement has contributed to the tumbling rates, according to Dr Norton.These programmes focused on counselling, reproductive health education, information, education and communication which are vital factors when considering a national response to the virus.However,despite Guyana’s persistence in combating the virus, inevitably a number of obstacles have been stumbled upon with the primary one being financial constraints.Nonetheless, the country remains unyielding in achieving the goal of eliminating HIV/AIDS.last_img read more

Candidates face off in forum

first_imgThe forum comes less than two weeks before residents vote in the May 2 general election. [asset|aid=3539|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=7a49f8fba7287f079848c22c48aa6ee7-Boone 1_1_Pub.mp3] Boone also discussed her opposition to the proposed Site C dam, saying it would flood valuable arable land.Green Party candidate Hilary Crowley said her party would implement a pollution tax and would then utilize the revenue from that tax to invest in clean energy sources.Another question touched on the current high price of gas, which appears to only be rising, as oil rose to more than $112 a barrel, Thursday.Advertisement Zimmer said this region, in particular, benefits from high oil and gas prices, but he believes that gas prices should be tied to oil prices, increasing or decreases as the price of oil does. Levine countered his statement saying the high prices appear to be a form of price gouging, especially in this region.Crowley said her party’s focus is on ensuring manufacturers make more fuel efficient vehicles and encouraging people to carpool.With the fall of the current government, trust also became a major theme of the evening and how voters can trust each of the candidates and their party leaders. Although each candidate discussed their – and their party’s – past records, the representative of the newest political party, Jeremy Coté, appeared to win favour with the audience when he discussed the need for Members of Parliament be held accountable for their actions. [asset|aid=3540|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=7a49f8fba7287f079848c22c48aa6ee7-Cote Recall 1_1_Pub.mp3] Despite a few questions and comments specifically targeting party platforms, the debate remained relatively calm. The most noticeable contention was between the Liberal and Conservative candidates, but appeared mostly one-sided, with Levine bringing up the Conservatives’ spending record and the fact that it was the first government in Canadian history to be brought down on a contempt of parliament charge.Advertisementcenter_img Photo:  Bob Zimmer presents his opening remarks while the other candidates look on at the Pomeory Hotel – Kimberley Molina/Energeticcity.ca- Advertisement – Nearly 100 residents attended Thursday night’s All Candidates Forum held in Fort St. John that dealt with topics ranging from the long-gun registry to health care to the legalization of marijuana.One of the first questions asked in the debate centred on climate change and food sustainability, specifically in the Peace River region.Liberal Party candidate Ben Levine said the Liberals have a plan to provide assistance to farmers, investing $80 million in a ‘buy local’ program and focusing on investments in clean energy resources.Conservative Party candidate Bob Zimmer took a different approach, saying that even though the Conservatives take the environment seriously, they also take a realistic and balanced approach that does not sacrifice the economy.NDP candidate Lois Boone said that climate change is a serious problem and discussed a policy to diminish its impact.Advertisementlast_img read more

Queensway Security Services on board

first_imgGuinness Cage “East Coast Best vs the Rest” Competition Renowned for its unrivalled provision of services in the security sector, Queensway Security Services confirmed its association with the Three Peat Promotions’ Guinness Cage Competition following a simple ceremony at the entity’s head office at Oronoque and Regent Streets on Friday.The five-day tournament dubbed “the East Coast Best versus the Rest” will commence on August 8, at the Haslington Market Tarmac with the remaining playing days being August 11, 18, and 25 and September 1, at the same venue.Making the presentation of a cheque for an undisclosed sum to Three Peat Promotions’ Rawle Welch was Queensway Security Services Operations Manager Clay Flatts, who did so in the presence of Chief Operations Officer Lancelot Khan.Flatts, a former standout footballer, praised the promoters for their willingness to support the development of the game and urged that they execute the tournament with the professionalism and discipline that are associated with the company.Khan, in his remarks, said he was keen to understand the sport and promised to attend the event.Welch expressed his gratitude to the company for its significant support at the Promotions’ first call, adding that it signalled the seriousness of the organisation in helping to develop sports and cohesion among the various communities that the participating teams come from.He said unlike many other corporate entities that prefer to wait and watch a product develop before getting on board, Queensway has led the way in helping to shape and develop the product.“I have to say that Queensway Security Services is a shining example of what corporate responsibility is and should other entities duplicate their deed, then sports and athletes will be able to strive,” Welch mentioned.The company provides a range of security services, including static, armed and unarmed guards, armed patrol, response services, alarm monitoring, emergency response, security escorts and VIP protection service.Twenty-four teams will contest the competition with a minimum of 12 chosen from East Coast villages, while the remainder will comprise teams from Georgetown, Linden and West Demerara.Every night, there will be a winner among the fans – the fan who buys the most buckets of the sponsor’s beverages.Among the other entities who have pledged their support are: Banks DIH under its Guinness and Power Wine brands; Clarks footwear giants Chetsons; E-Networks Inc; KSM Investments; Yhip’s Bakery; Brass Aluminium & Cast Iron Foundry (BACIF); Ray’s Auto Sales; YK Investments; Trophy Stall; Express Shipping; Woodpecker Products; National Sports Commission; C Division of the Guyana Police Force; Attorney-at-Law Roysdale Forde; Julius Variety Store and C & C Prestigious Styles.last_img read more

Arsenal summer spending spree: Sanchez to be followed by Khedira, Debuchy and more?

first_img1 Could Arsenal reunite Mesut Ozil and Sami Khedira at club level next season? talkSPORT look at five players that could follow Alexis to the Emirates Arsenal have made a statement of intent with their £33m deal for Alexis Sanchez, and the Gunners aren’t done yet. Arsene Wenger is expected to add several more players to his squad across all areas of the pitch, and some of the deals appear to be at an advanced stage. talkSPORT takes a look at five players that could follow Alexis to the Emirates…Javier ManquilloThe young Atletico Madrid right back has struggled to gain minutes at his boyhood club with Juanfran unshakable in his position. The Rojiblancos looked close to agreeing a loan deal with Marcelo Bielsa’s Marseille earlier this month, but reports in England say Arsenal have interrupted negotiations, offering a loan spell of their own with the request of including an option to buy in the contract. It remains to be seen if Atletico are willing to let him leave for the long term.Sami KhediraThe Real Madrid midfielder missed most of last season through injury, but proved his worth when he returned to play in their Champions League final win, and has gone on to excel with Germany at the World Cup. The imminent arrival of his compatriot Toni Kroos at the Bernabeu could see Khedira nudged out the door, and Arsenal are more than willing to offer him a move to England. His high salary along with Madrid’s own high expectations of a transfer fee mean the move is unlikely to be resolved quickly however.Mathieu DebuchyThe Newcastle right back was picked over Bacary Sagna at the World Cup, and he looks likely to step into the latter’s place at club level next season. Le Figaro say Arsenal will pay €10m (around £8m) for the defender, with the move expected to be announced in the coming days.Jackson MartinezAfter signing Alexis Sanchez Arsenal are also in the market for a more traditional striker capable of leading the line, and Porto’s Jackson Martinez is regularly linked with a move to the Emirates. The Colombian admits he has offers from various clubs, but is remaining ambiguous while Porto mull over the possibility of a sale. Along with Arsenal, Valencia’s new owner Peter Lim has made Martinez his number one target this summer.Juan CuadradoOne of the most exciting players at the World Cup, Fiorentina will struggle to keep a hold of Juan Cuadrado this summer, and along with Barcelona, Arsenal are one of his biggest suitors. Capable of playing both on the wing and as a wingback in front of a three man defence, the Colombian is an excellent dribbler and has shown good decision-making in the box this summer, and attractive quality for any club looking to strengthen. Fiorentina will hold out for a significant fee before they’ll sell.Gooners, would you like to see these players at the Emirates? Let us know below…last_img read more