Kathryn Borel emerges from anonymity with a scathing indictment of Jian Ghomeshi

Borel blamed the CBC for not helping her when she first lodged a complaint.“When I went to the CBC for help, what I received in return was a directive that yes, he could do this, and yes, it was my job to let him,” she said. “The relentless message to me from my celebrity boss and the national institution he worked for were that his whims were more important than my humanity or my dignity. So I came to accept this. I came to believe that it was his right.”Borel left the CBC because of the abuse and now works in California. The CBC apologized for how Ghomeshi treated Borel and said that the broadcaster has implemented changes to prevent something similar from happening in the future. “What Ms. Borel experienced in our workplace should never have happened and we sincerely apologize for what occurred,” the CBC said in a statement. “As we said in April of 2015, the incidents that came to our attention as it relates to Mr. Ghomeshi’s conduct in our workplace were simply unacceptable. We apologized then and we do again today.”In April 2015, CBC President Hubert LaCroix offered an apology for the broadcaster’s role in the toxic workplace environment. This followed an independent, third-party report into the myriad allegations against Ghomeshi.I want to apologize to Ms. Borel for my behaviour toward her in the workplace“To be clear, like the trial in February and the subsequent ruling, this particular court case is also unrelated to our decision to end Jian Ghomeshi’s employment with CBC. As we said in March, based on the evidence that came to our attention, Mr. Ghomeshi’s actions were not in line with the values of the public broadcaster nor with our employee code of conduct and we stand by this decision.”Ghomeshi apologized today for his “thoughtless and insensitive” behaviour, saying he has spent the last 18 months reflecting on his actions and the damage they have caused. During that time, he has seen a therapist whose identity is protected by a publication ban. In a letter submitted to the court, the registered social worker said that Ghomeshi “has been a highly engaged participant…. He continues to take accountability for his choices and actions, and continues to explore and practice skills that support healthier relationships.” [np_storybar title=”Full transcripts of Borel’s statement, CBC response and Ghomeshi’s apology” link=”#1″ ] [/np_storybar]TORONTO — A former colleague of Jian Ghomeshi who accused him of sexually assaulting her says his courtroom apology is an admission of guilt even though it won’t lead to a criminal conviction.Kathryn Borel, a former CBC employee, says she agreed to a peace bond over a trial because “it seemed like the clearest path to the truth.”She says that in the three years they worked together, Ghomeshi made it clear to her that “he could do what he wanted to me and my body.”According to the allegations read in court, Ghomeshi grabbed Borel from behind at work in 2008 and ground his pelvis into her. Laura Pedersen / National Post Ghomeshi’s lawyer, Marie Henein, said he had been through an “intensely public trial.”She said he has come through the situation with dignity.The apology is “everything the Crown and courts” had asked him to do.Crown lawyer Michael Callaghan read a brief statement of facts on which the prosecution relied for the peace bond.[np_storybar title=”A recap of Aileen Donnelly’s live updates from court” link=”#codeword”] [/np_storybar]“By apologizing for his actions, Mr. Ghomeshi accepts responsibility for his actions,” Callaghan said.Ghomeshi will have to stay away from Borel and not possess weapons under the peace bond, which is not a finding of guilt.In March, Ghomeshi was acquitted on sexual assault and choking charges related to three other complainants.Ghomeshi had previously insisted he did nothing wrong and pleaded not guilty.Laura Pedersen / National Post After signing a peace bond, the Crown withdrew the charge of sexual assault for which Ghomeshi was slated to stand trial in June.Ghomeshi, 48, was charged one year ago in relation to the incident.Borel consented to waiving a court-ordered ban on publicly identifying her.“I want to apologize to Ms. Borel for my behaviour toward her in the workplace,” Ghomeshi said.“I now recognize that I crossed boundaries inappropriately. I did not appreciate the damage that I caused. I understand this now.”Peter J. Thompson / National Post He had been expected to stand trial next month on a single charge of sexual assault related to the 2008 incident at CBC headquarters.The summary sexual assault charge Ghomeshi faced carries a maximum of 10 years behind bars on conviction.In March, the former host of the CBC radio show “Q” was acquitted of sexual assault and choking charges related to incidents alleged to have occurred in 2002 and 2003.In finding Ghomeshi not guilty, Judge William Horkins said he simply did not believe that the three complainants, who all had some kind of romantic encounters with the accused, were credible — sparking raucous protests outside the court from women activists decrying how the justice system treats sexual assault complainants.One of the three woman, Linda Redgrave, said after Wednesday’s hearing that she, too, wanted an apology.“I would like to hear him say he was sorry. I would like to hear him admit that he did what he did to me, and I actually want to know why,” said Redgrave, who has also agreed to be identified.“He’s admitting to wrongdoing only by force; he was forced into it with this peace bond. Where’s my apology?”The full statement from the CBC:What Ms. Borel experienced in our workplace should never have happened and we sincerely apologize for what occurred. As we said in April of 2015, the incidents that came to our attention as it relates to Mr. Ghomeshi’s conduct in our workplace were simply unacceptable. We apologized then and we do again today. To be clear, like the trial in February and the subsequent ruling, this particular court case is also unrelated to our decision to end Jian Ghomeshi’s employment with CBC. As we said in March, based on the evidence that came to our attention, Mr. Ghomeshi’s actions were not in line with the values of the public broadcaster nor with our employee code of conduct and we stand by this decision. We accepted the findings of the Rubin report and have since made significant progress on all the elements of our year-one action plan. We’ve launched new mandatory training programs for HR staff, for managers and for all employees. We’ve introduced a new bullying and harassment helpline. We’ve revised our process for capturing the details of bullying and harassment complaints. We are responding to complaints with renewed discipline and rigour, and learning from the data to improve prevention and early resolution. The past year’s progress has set a strong foundation for what’s next and the work that remains. That is, to have a broader conversation around culture with a clear focus on a healthy climate to support the wellbeing of all our staff. A full transcript of Kathryn Borel’s statement outside the courtHi, everyone, thanks for coming out and listening. My name is Kathryn Borel. In December of 2014, I pressed sexual assault charges against Jian Ghomeshi. As you know, Mr. Ghomeshi initially denied all the charges that were brought against him. But today, as you just heard, Jian Ghomeshi admitted wrongdoing and apologized to me. It’s unfortunate but maybe not surprising that he chose not say much about what exactly he was apologizing for. I’m going to provide those details for you now. Everyday, over the course of a three-year-period, Mr. Ghomeshi made it clear to me that he could do what he wanted to me and my body. He made it clear that he could humiliate me repeatedly and walk away with impunity. There are at least three documented incidents of physical touching. This includes the one charge he just apologized for, when he came up behind me while I was standing near my desk, put his hands on my hips and rammed his pelvis against my backside, over and over, simulating sexual intercourse. Throughout the time that I worked with him, he framed his actions with near-daily verbal assaults and emotional manipulations. His inferences felt like threats, or declarations like I deserved to have happening to me what was happening to me. It became very difficult for me to trust what I was feeling. Up until recently, I didn’t even internalize that what he was doing to my body was sexual assault because, when I went to the CBC for help, what I received in return was a directive that yes, he could do this, and yes, it was my job to let him. The relentless message to me from my celebrity boss and the national institution he worked for were that his whims were more important than my humanity or my dignity. So I came to accept this. I came to believe that it was his right. But when I spoke to the police at the end of 2014, and detailed my experiences with Mr. Ghomeshi, they confirmed to me that what he did to me was, in fact, sexual assault. That’s what Jian Ghomeshi just apologized for. The crime of sexual assault. This is the story of a man who had immense power over me and my livelihood admitting that he chronically abused his power and violated me in ways that violated the law. Mr. Ghomeshi’s constant workplace abuse of me and my many colleagues and friends has since been corroborated by multiple sources, a CBC fifth estate documentary and a third-party investigation. In a perfect world, people who commit sexual assault would be convicted for their crimes. Jian Ghomeshi is guilty of having done the things that I have outlined today. So when it was presented to me the defence would be offering us an apology, I was prepared to forego a trial. It seemed to be the clearest path to the truth. A trial would have maintained his lie; the lie that he was not guilty. And it would have further subjected me to the very same pattern of abuse that I am currently trying to stop. Jian Ghomesi has apologized, but only to me. There are 20 other women who have come forward to the media and made serious allegations about this violent behaviour. Women who have come forward to say that he punched and choked and smothered and silenced them. There is no way that I would have come forward if it wasn’t for their courage. And yet Mr. Ghomeshi hasn’t met any of their allegations head-on, as he vowed to do in his Facebook post of 2014. He hasn’t taken the stand on any charge. All he has said about his other accusers is that they are all lying, and that he is not guilty. And remember, that’s what he said about me. I think we all want this to be over, but it won’t be until he admits to everything that he has done.A full transcript of Jian Ghomeshi’s apologyI want to apologize to Ms. Borel for my behaviour towards her in the workplace. In the last 18 months, I have spent a great deal of time reflecting on this incident and the difficulties I caused Ms. Borel, and I have had to come to terms with my own deep regret and embarrassment. I enjoyed a position of privilege in my job at the CBC as the host of a program I loved. I was a person in a position of authority and leadership, and I did not show the respect that I should have to Ms. Borel. I did not always lead by example and I failed to understand and truly appreciate the impact of my conduct on Ms. Borel’s work environment. That conduct in the workplace was sexually inappropriate. I realize that there is no way for me to know the full impact on her personally and professionally. I now recognize that I cross boundaries inappropriately. A workplace should not have any sexualized tone. I failed to understand how my works and actions would put a coworker who was younger than me, and in a junior position to mine, in an uncomfortable place. I did not appreciate the damage that I caused, and I recognize that no workplace friendship or creative environment excuses this sort of behaviour, especially when there is a power imbalance as there was with Ms. Borel. This incident was thoughtless and I was insensitive to her perspective and how demeaning my conduct was towards her. I understand this now. This is a challenging business to be in and I did not need to make it more difficult for Ms. Borel. The past 18 months have been an education for me. I have reflected deeply and have been working hard to address the attitudes that led me, at the time, to think that this was acceptable. I apologize to my family for letting them down and in particular for the impact that all of this has had on my dear mother and my sister. I apologize for the burden my actions have placed on those dear friends who have stood by me throughout this difficult time. I regret my behaviour at work with all of my heart and I hope that I can find forgiveness from those for whom my actions took such a toll.A full transcript of Marie Henein’s statement to the courtI want to make a few very brief comments because at this stage, 18 months later, I cannot think of much that has not been said about this matter by someone somewhere. But there are a few, final thoughts that I would like to say and I think need to be said at this moment. Let me begin by thanking the court for accommodating us today and allowing the matter to be brought forward. The conclusion of this matter is entirely appropriate for all the reasons set out by Mr. Callaghan. The conclusion to this matter today, as your honour knows, is entirely consistent. It is not an admission or a plea. I want to thank Mr. Callaghan and Ms. Klukach. And while prosecutors need not be thanked for the job that they must do, it would be wrong to not acknowledge that in some cases, this is quite simply more challenging than others. They have done so. I am grateful to Mr. Callaghan and Ms. Klukach for their integrity. They did the right thing. In the last 25 years in the criminal justice system, I have never seen a case like this one. I have never had a client be the subject of such an unrelenting public scrutiny and focus. I have been witness to it as closely as anyone can be. It is a focus that has not only been on Mr. Ghomeshi but also his family and those that have stood beside him. He has taken this time to reflect in a meaningful and sincere way. His apology demonstrates that. Throughout this, he has had his liberty restricted. He has been, as your honour is aware, on bail for 18 months. He has been through one of the most intensely public trials in our history. He has not been allowed to function in the most basic and routine of ways. The last 18 months are one of the most difficult I have witnessed anyone ever having to withstand. I do not think many of us would have been able to do so. But he as. With dignity and the solemnity that is appropriate, he has demonstrated his respect for the judicial system throughout. With this apology, Mr. Ghomeshi has done everything the Crown and the courts have asked him to do. It is in my sincerest hope that with the conclusion of this proceeding, Mr. Ghomeshi can move forward. On a personal level, it is my equally sincere hope that the Canadian public can now move forward. And while this matter has consumed the attention of so many, there are many equally important matters in this country that the public wants to know about and that I hope we can now turn our attention to.This is what Crown Michael Callaghan said in court today on the #Ghomeshi matter (1/3) pic.twitter.com/quQjmtqNSS— Sarah Boesveld (@sarahboesveld) May 11, 2016Crown Callaghan’s comments in court today #Ghomeshi (2/3) pic.twitter.com/Wcpo22I9j9— Sarah Boesveld (@sarahboesveld) May 11, 2016Crown Callaghan’s remarks in court re: #Ghomeshi, last page (3/3) pic.twitter.com/pKaokWHYDl— Sarah Boesveld (@sarahboesveld) May 11, 2016FirstPrev1 of 1NextLastThere are no entries on this page.FirstPrev1 of 1NextLast read more