Man Utd refuse to give up on Christian Eriksen despite Spurs ace’s summer snub

first_imgMost read in footballTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’NEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for himREF RAIDChampions League ref Vincic ‘arrested in raid into drugs and prostitution ring’NICE RONCristiano Ronaldo goes on family bike ride with partner Georgina Rodriguez & kidsEriksen came off the bench in Wednesday’s 2-1 defeat at Old Trafford and is yet to start a game under Mourinho.Tottenham host Burnley tomorrow before heading to Germany to take on Bayern Munich.The Bundesliga giants hammered Spurs 7-2 in the reverse fixture – one of a series of poor results which cost Poch his job.ACCA WITH LADBROKES Pick up a whole load of acca features to help you land the big one2Man Utd could use Jose Mourinho favourite Matic as bait to land Spurs ace Eriksen in January transfer window MANCHESTER UNITED are plotting a January swoop for Christian Eriksen despite him rejecting them over the summer, according to reports.The Real Madrid target, 27, opted to play out his final season at Champions League finalists Tottenham amid interest from Old Trafford.2 Christian Eriksen can start speaking to foreign clubs in JanuaryCredit: ReutersBut The Mirror claims that Ole Gunnar Solskjaer will try to secure a cut-price deal in January to beat rival offers, with Spurs potentially accepting a £40m fee.He will have to work fast as Eriksen can speak to foreign clubs about a free transfer from the start of the year as he enters the last six months of his deal.Once a key figure for Mauricio Pochettino, the Danish international has struggled to find form this season as speculation about his future continues.And with Jose Mourinho starting to get the best out of Dele Alli in the No10 role, Eriksen could see his opportunities limited.United would offer him an escape route but there would be plenty of interest in the playmaker from abroad this summer.Juventus and Atletico Madrid have also been circling, with the Old Lady renowned for picking up bargain free transfers every season.last_img read more

Indigenous groups, activists risk arrest to blockade logging in Malaysia

first_imgBlockades are being set up in peninsular Malaysia’s northern state of Kelantan by groups that say logging activities are damaging forests and the surrounding environment.Kelantan has seen more forest clearing in recent years as the state ramps up tree plantation development.Activist groups say forestry departments are granting forest access to logging companies, while restricting access to forest-dependent communities.Malaysian courts ruled recently that forests being targeted by logging companies belong to indigenous Orang Asli communities. GUA MUSANG, Malaysia – In their fight for the rights of peninsular Malaysia’s native people, the Orang Asli, an alliance of women are making waves in the country’s highly conservative society as they support the efforts of communities and activists trying to stop logging of the region’s forests. The women represent a variety of fields and organizations and are speaking out and even risking arrest in their struggle for the forests and the communities that depend on them.Mongabay joined them on a convoy deep into the rainforests of northern Malaysia’s Kelantan State to supply provisions to anti-logging campaigns, traveling by night to evade detection by State Forestry Department police. Here, the Temiar indigenous peoples are resisting deforestation by setting up road blockade camps in local forest reserves. By March 2017, three blockade camps had reportedly been torn down by forestry police, but the Temiar vowed to set up more.The terrain was mountainous and the dirt logging trail had been regularly pounded by the heavy monsoon rains, making progress treacherous. The convoy passed Orang Asli villages along the road, punctuated with log piles and bulldozers at the trackside.“If we see any of the big guys [elephants], turn off your engine and lights and wait for them to pass,” Karin Lee of PEKA (Preservation of Natural Heritage Organization) announced over the radio to the convoy.Temiar indigenous activist Mustafa Along, takes the GPS position of a log stack near a logging camp in Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com“We brought cooking oil, rice, milk for the children, all the dry stuff for their basic everyday use,” said Sabrina Syed (full name: Puan Sri Shariffa Sabrina Syed Akil), president of PEKA. The convey of three four-wheel-drive vehicles loaded with food supplies, arrived at the isolated community of Kampong Tambaga in Pos Gob district in Kelantan State at 4 a.m., after an arduous ten-hour journey.“We have no choice but to come in at night,” Syed said. “Of course if they see us, they have the right to arrest us,” A successful entrepreneur with an eco-resort and restaurant, Syed established PEKA in 2010.No permit, no entrance into the forestIn November 2016, the State Forestry Department stopped issuing permits to enter the forest reserve areas where the Orang Asli live, reportedly in response to the blockades. However, the forest is still subject to licenses that authorize private companies to log the forest.“It’s not that we don’t want to ask for a permit, but they have frozen the permit at the moment because they do not want us giving any support to the Orang Asli,” Syed said.Jules Ong, a film director and cameraman said he had already been arrested in January for filming a blockade being demolished by forestry officials.“The sentence is three years and 15,000 Malaysian Ringit just for entering a jungle,” said Ong during an interview in March 2017. He thinks he will find out next month whether he will be charged. Despite this, he still decided to join the supply convoy into the forest reserve without a permit.Section 47(1) of Malaysia’s National Forestry Enactment (NFE) prohibits entering a forest reserve without a valid permit.“You can apply for a permit [at] the Gua Musang Forestry office,” Encik Razali Bin Abdu Raman from the Kelantan State Forestry Department said during a March 23 interview. He was unclear, however, on whether the freeze on permits was still in place. The Gua Musang Forestry Department office confirmed that a permit was required to enter the forest reserve, but refused to clarify whether it would issue one to enter the area where the blockades had taken place. Although the Orang Asli – which translates to “original people” and refers collectively to the indigenous groups of West Malaysia – have been living a subsistence livelihood for millennia, community members say their high level of dependence on food gathered from the forest has made them vulnerable to the impacts of logging.“The logging companies keep on coming to the area. We want to stop that. This land has belonged to us for hundreds of years, since our ancestors,” said Yussuman Bin Andor, a Temiar man from the village of Kampong Pos Gob.Early morning mist hangs over the forest in Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com“We plan to do the blockades again to protect the waterfalls, the river, the medicinal plants,” Bin Andor said. “The fish in the river are all finished, we don’t have fish anymore. So we have to stop the logging however we can.” He explained that the river has silted up due to soil erosion from nearby logging. He said the variety and amount of plants gathered for use in cooking and healing has also declined, leading to concern about the impacts of logging on their region.The main reason for bringing in the food supplies, Syed explained, is to sustain the communities while they are spending time on their logging blockades.“They have to spend a lot of time on the blockade so they don’t have time to look for food,” she said.‘We will be mounting another blockade’The headman of Tambaga convened a meeting the morning after our arrival on March 12 to welcome the guests and thank them for the food supplies. Then, more than forty men assembled from the surrounding Temiar communities to discuss their next steps together with their lawyer Siti Kasim and PEKA’s Sabrina Syed.“We will be mounting another blockade in the coming weeks,” announced Temiar activist Mustafa Along after the discussions, which included a debate on whether or not forming human chains would make future blockades more effective.Headman of Kampong Tambaga, Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comIndigenous Temiar children lean against a tree at the center of their village of Kampong Tambaga, Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comThey agreed that they would keep the blockades peaceful despite what they described as heavy-handed tactics from the Forestry Department. Singaporean English language Asian cable television news agency Channel NewsAsia (CNA) reported the Forestry Department used chainsaws to cut down their manned barricades in January, allegedly leaving one man seriously injured.“Blowpipes are not for fun, not for display, they are used for a certain reason. If we use blowpipes it is to kill,” said the elected headman elder known as the “Panghulu.” He reminded those assembled that the presence of poison dart blowpipes at the blockades was unacceptable as tribal protocol stipulates they are reserved only for killing. The Orang Asli live in permanent forest reserves administered and policed by the State Forestry Department. According to CNA’s investigation, 90 percent of reserves are licensed out to logging companies.Syed says that the Forestry Department profits handsomely from the logging business.“When they give out the licenses they get money immediately,” she said.Experts say that logging, though not a new part of the economy in Kelantan, has taken a new turn in recent years. “Selective logging [of big trees] is being replaced by clear-cutting for plantations,” said Shamila Ariffin, research officer with Friends of the Earth Malaysia.According to Forestry Department numbers, Kelantan had 867,866 hectares of forest in 2008 and is the state with the third-largest forested area in peninsular Malaysia. However clearance for conversion to timber plantations has skyrocketed from 14,819 hectares in 2008 to 166,291 hectares in 2014, for a total of 151,472 hectares converted over this period, and still continuing.Tree cover loss — which signifies both deforestation and tree plantation harvesting/clearing activity – has increased in Kelantan in recent years. Satellite data from the University of Maryland show nearly a third of the state experienced tree cover loss from 2001 through 2015, with 2014 showing the highest loss numbers over that period. Intact forest landscapes – areas of original land cover large and undisturbed enough to retain their native biodiversity levels – are relegated to Kelantan’s southern and western peripheries.Areas targeted by logging companies include remaining intact forest landscapes (IFLs), with satellite imagery from Planet Labs captured April 2017 showing a large network of logging roads infiltrating a now-degraded IFL. Activist and indigenous groups are setting up blockades in the region to stymie further logging activities.“What the authorities are doing now is they are clear-cutting the forest to plant rubber trees and it affects the water catchment area,” Syed said, explaining how heavy erosion after logging has caused siltation in rivers. “Once the water catchment is affected, the rivers are affected, and the fish in the rivers, so everything is affected like a domino effect.”Those working with the Orang Asli say there is little official recognition of their rights. In a report, the NGO Friends of the Earth Malaysia states “in Peninsular Malaysia forestry resources are stipulated to be the absolute property of the state, while Orang Asli communities are burdened with numerous legal restrictions and impediments in their efforts to manage their ancestral forests.”Taking the conflict to the courtsSiti Zabedah Kasim is a lawyer with the Malaysian Bar Council. She has dedicated herself to legally representing the rights of the Orang Asli for several years and is a frequent visitor to their communities.“I‘ve decided to choose the Orang Asli area because I feel they are still under-represented and they need empowerment, they need more help,” Kasim said in an interview. She added that it is a painstaking task because “the court case will take so long,” by which time the loggers may have concluded operations and moved on.Lawyer Siti Kasim (far right) inspects a log stack together with Temiar men from the region of Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comAccording to Kasim, Orang Asli claims of land rights and ownership to their communal forest are routinely ignored by the State Forest Department.“The Forest Department seem to think that the Orang Asli here are only ‘tenants at will,’ meaning they are not the occupier or the land-owners,” she said. “They keep saying that these people are merely squatters, have no rights basically. So because of that, the Forestry Department seem to think they can do whatever they like by taking the land or log around their ancestral land, without thinking how it will affect the community.”The Malaysian governance structure provides state governments with the highest level of control over decisions relating to land use.“It’s a problem when even the Human Rights Commission set up by the government…came up with a report with 16 recommendations [that] are still not done,” Kasim said, adding that the federal government does have a responsibility for the rights of the Orang Asli but have been reluctant to get involved.“The federal government can actually do something because the Orang Asli welfare comes under the federal government,” she said. “The six million dollar question that we lawyers keep asking is why? Why is it not being taken seriously by the government, the federal or the state government?”A logging truck at the side of the road in Kelantan state, Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comA indigenous Temiar man stands in front of rainforest that has been selectively logged in Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comOn January 17, 2017, Kasim won a high court judgement against logging company Jejarang Wagasan, which had taken the Temiar to court for blockading their logging operations.“We established that the Orang Asli are actually in possession [of the land], not the loggers,” said Kasim, adding, “the court agreed with us.”However, local resident Yussuman Bin Andor alleges the Forestry Department defied the judgement and ordered guards to break down three blockades, arresting 16 indigenous Temiar people in the process.“On that day they just ambushed and destroyed everything,” Bin Andor said.Mongabay made several requests for comment from officials at Kelantan and Gua Musang Forest Departments, but those requests were denied or went unanswered.“They [the logging company] actually now have appealed…so we are just waiting for the date for them to appeal. So it’s still ongoing,” Kasim said.Kasim added that she regularly receives threats for her outspoken work, but that she intends to continue: “They don’t like that I’m an outspoken woman. I receive a lot of threats, even death threats,” she said.Arrested, againSabrina Syed and her colleagues from PEKA departed a day early in one vehicle to make the long journey out of the forest. But they did not make it out.“We have to get out now!” Siti Kasim shouted as we were woken in the community longhouse at 1 a.m. Syed had been arrested along with two colleagues and their driver, and their vehicle impounded. With no telephone signal, a Temiar scout had made the arduous journey through the night on his motorbike to alert us that the same temporary Forestry Department checkpoint that had caught them was still in place.Attempting a longer route that would have bypassed the checkpoint, our way out was halted by a landslide. Instead we waited in the forest until Temiar scouts could check the situation. We finally got word in the small hours of the night that the checkpoint had been left unmanned and at 6.30 a.m. we finally emerged from the forest.Syed and her companions were arrested at the roadblock, then escorted in a vehicle convoy to the town of Gua Musang. On the advice of her lawyer, Syed insisted on going to the police station rather than the Forest Department office. After a night in the police station, Syed and her companions were able to leave on bail terms. Mongabay spoke to her immediately after her release.“You are trespassing on a Forest Reserve so you have to come with us,” Syed said, relaying what the Forestry Department guard had told her at the moment of their arrest. She said they were escorted out of the forest by three vehicles.Sabrina Syed, President of charity PEKA, shortly before her arrest by Forestry Department guards from Gua Musang in Pos Gob district, Kelantan. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.com“Our lawyer recommended we go to the police station instead of the Forestry Department,” she said, and once there they filed a police report. She said that when they had finished, they attempted to leave the police station but were blocked by Forestry Department guards.“They started getting rowdy. They pushed our hands behind our backs,” she said, adding that they retreated back into the police station.“This Forestry Department is furious at us for opening this can of worms, the corruption and so on,” Syed said.The Forestry Department did not respond to attempts made by Mongabay to confirm the events.“We are all on verbal bail and have to return here April 14,” said Karin Lee of PEKA.On April 23, Malaysia’s High Court ruled that 9,300 hectares of Gua Musang forest legally belongs to the Orang Asli – including 1,000 hectares the Forest Department had slated for clearing.However, Lee said that the Forest Department is still threatening to destroy any new blockades.“They [the Forestry Department] also ‘advise’ the community to not further set up any [more] blockades,” Lee said, adding that the department provided a warning that “if they continue with [a] blockade, the [Forestry Department] will NOT hesitate to demolish it under the forestry act.”Syed, who was also arrested in December 2016 for making comments about deforestation, which the Sultan of Johor Baru regarded as insulting, vows to continue.“They expect me to stop doing all this or what?”Indigenous Temiar men take shelter from the rain in a dilapidated building in Pos Gob district in Kelantan state, West Malaysia. Photo by Rod Harbinson/RodHarbinson.comFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Agriculture, Environment, Environmental Activism, Featured, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Government, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Rights, Logging, Plantations, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Roads, Rubber, Selective Logging, Timber, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Coal undermines Indonesia’s food production: report

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Aquaculture, Coal, Energy, Environment, Fish Farming, Food, Fossil Fuels, Land Use Change, Mining Analyzing government spatial planning maps, researchers for the Waterkeeper Alliance and the Mining Advocacy Network found that 19 percent of Indonesia’s rice-growing land falls within exploration or mining concessions for coal.The study calculated that coal mining already costs the country 1.7 million tons of potential rice production, and another 6 million tons of current production are under threat.Loss of agricultural productivity is due to land-use change and contamination of water used for irrigation. Indonesia’s goal of achieving food self-sufficiency, especially for rice, might be in doubt as the country converts agricultural land into coal mining sites, a recent study found.The report, launched in May by the environment NGOs Waterkeeper Alliance and the Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM), examines the impacts of coal concessions on Indonesia’s rice production at a time when the country is already likely to suffer reduced yields due to climate change.The study concluded that around 1.7 million tons of rice per year has already been lost to coal mining and another 6 million tons per year of existing rice production is at risk if rice-growing areas that fall within exploration concessions are mined for coal.If mining proceeds in coal concessions that fall within areas identified as suitable for new rice production, an additional 11 million tons of rice per year would be lost, says the report.Activists send a message in the middle of Ponowareng village rice fields to show their opposition to a coal-fired power plant in Batang, Central Java. Photo courtesy of Greenpeace.Merah Johansyah, coordinator of the Mining Advocacy Network, said the amount of rice already determined to be lost due to mining is equivalent to the country’s annual rice imports.“If things were managed properly, we wouldn’t need to import rice anymore,” said Johansyah at the report launch in Jakarta.Analyzing government spatial planning maps, the researchers found that coal concessions cover 19 percent of the 44 million hectares (170,000 square miles) of rice-growing land in Indonesia — 1.6 million hectares within operating mining concessions and 6.5 million hectares within coal exploration concessions.“This is only rice, we have yet to report on other crops,” said Johansyah, who called for a moratorium on mining in agricultural land.A farmer named Azis stands near his small fish pond, polluted by coal dust and chemicals in Santan Ilir village in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.The impacts of miningCoal mining, the report contends, depletes and contaminates water resources, leaving previously cultivable land unsuitable for growing food.Mines reduce available ground- and surface water and pollute these vital resources with acidic drainage and heavy metals. Villagers living near coal mines reported having no option but to use mine pit water for washing, bathing, irrigation of crops and fish farming, and told researchers their rice yields were consequently reduced by 50 percent and fish production by 80 percent.The researchers also analyzed water samples from 17 coal mining sites and surrounding waterways. All but two were found to have concentrations of aluminum, iron, manganese and/or pH balances likely to have an impact on crop production and fish farming.For example, water samples taken from the largest mining site in East Kalimantan were found to have aluminum concentrations that exceeded by 21 times, and iron by 119 times, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum recommended concentrations for freshwater aquatic life.Budi Haryanto, an environmental health expert at the University of Indonesia, said the minerals tested for — iron, aluminum and manganese —are required by the human body, but can be harmful above certain levels. “They found that these minerals exceeded standards,” he said, adding that coal contains additional damaging substances beyond those examined in the report.According to the study, aluminum toxicity has been linked to neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer disease.High concentration of aluminum in water can also be deadly for fish.A farmer protests rice farm land which will be used for the Batang coal-fired power plant project. Photo by Wijaya S./Greenpeace.In plants, aluminum toxicity can reduce root systems, induces a variety of nutrient-deficiency symptoms and decreases yields. Iron toxicity causes similar problems, potentially resulting in poor plant growth and severe yield reductions at concentrations above 10 parts per million (ppm). For aquatic life, iron has been found to be harmful at concentrations as low as 1ppm.“It turns out that there are no standards for heavy metals contamination in water used for agriculture, Johansyah said.On the contrary, he added, Indonesian law allows abandoned mining sites to be used for housing, tourism, water and cultivation.  “The regulation allows it and there’s no water quality monitoring as there are no standards,” he said. “There are regulations on water standards for agriculture but they do not give specific numbers.”Haryanto emphasized that the factors examined in the report represent just a small fraction of the health and environmental dangers coal can cause.“It means that you need to push it farther [from humans]. That’s how it should be regulated. There should not be water pollution or river pollution,” he said. “They [mine pits] should be buried, not turned into housing or containing water or parks.” FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Study links most Amazon deforestation to 128 slaughterhouses

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new study by the NGO Imazon finds that just 128 slaughterhouses process 93 percent of cattle raised in the Brazilian Amazon. The areas of influence supplying the herds to those plants coincide with where the most Amazon deforestation occurs.The total pasture area, or zone of influence, corresponding to the 128 slaughterhouses provided an 88 percent match with the deforested area that occurred in the Amazon between 2010 and 2015.Based on a probability map created by the study, a 90 percent match was also found between the 128 slaughterhouse zones of estimated cattle supply and the Amazon areas projected to have a higher risk of new deforestation in future.The study adds weight to the idea that the most effective deforestation enforcement strategy is not to regulate the Amazon’s 400,000 ranchers and farmers, but for government to enter into effective deforestation enforcement partnerships with the slaughterhouses. The Imazon study linked most Amazon deforestation to just 128 slaughterhouses. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabaySatellites are mechanical reporters of the Amazon deforestation process. By documenting the degradation and gaps created by the clear-cutting process over the years, they deliver the verdict: two-thirds of the Amazon’s deforested area has been turned into pastures.From the ground, the cattle count reveals that the Amazon is home to more cattle than people. By 2016, the region’s cattle numbers amounted to 85 million head, compared to a human population of 25 million — more than three cows per person. In the city of São Félix do Xingu, which contains the largest herd in Brazil, this proportion reaches 18 cows to 1 person.The Brazilian Amazon covers 61 percent of the nation’s territory and harbors 40 percent of the national herd. Cattle are kept on about 400,000 farms and ranches there, ranging in size from a few to tens of thousands of hectares.So it was that when the NGO Imazon finished a new and detailed survey on the region’s slaughterhouses, they received a major surprise: finding that a small number, just 128 active slaughterhouses belonging to 99 companies, are responsible for 93 percent of the annual slaughter — close to 12 million head.The fact that slaughterhouses represent a bottleneck in the livestock breeding chain was already known. But Imazon’s survey breaks new ground because it clearly reveals the geography of livestock production in the Brazilian Amazon, documenting the area of influence — the amount of pasture required to fulfill the supply demands of each of the 128 slaughterhouses.Beef cattle awaiting slaughter in a corral. Photo by Fabio NascimentoTo put things in perspective, fulfilling the annual processing capacity of a single large meat processing plant requires ​​almost 600 thousand hectares (2,317 square miles) of pasture, an area more than seven times larger than New York City. The set of slaughterhouses analyzed in the study, operating at full capacity, would require a pasture area of ​​68 million hectares (262,559 square miles, or roughly the size of Texas). Importantly, this amount exceeds the total pasture area available in the region today, indicating that in the near future cattle ranching will generate more Amazon deforestation.Imazon’s study results reinforce the correctness of the satellite record, documenting an ongoing Amazon deforestation process linked to the cattle industry.With this reality in mind, the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), the independent federal prosecutor’s office, has pressured the region’s slaughterhouses to sign the so-called Beef Agreement since 2009, starting in the state of Pará. This contract, made between the MPF and each signing slaughterhouse, commits the firms to inspections of the pasture land where acquired animals originated, in order to ban cattle pasture expansions resulting in deforestation.Paulo Barreto, the Imazon study lead researcher, explains the practicality of the processing plant contracts: “It was like having two options to address this issue: gathering managers for each of these 100 slaughterhouse firms in a conference room or, alternatively, filling five huge soccer stadiums with all the farmers involved in cattle ranching.”Fulfilling the annual processing capacity of a single large meat processing plant in the Amazon requires almost 600 thousand hectares (2,317 square miles) of pasture, an area more than seven times larger than New York City. The need for so much pasture has resulted in significant deforestation. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayDeforestation riskThe analysis detailing the influence of so few slaughterhouses on almost the entire Amazon cattle industry involved detective work and geoprocessing technology.The first step was to obtain the addresses of every large meatpacking plant and certify them by using high-definition satellite images to look for typical facilities, such as corrals and wastewater treatment systems. From there, researchers wanted to answer two questions: what was the potential cattle supply range for each slaughterhouse? And, how do these potential pasture supply zones relate to already deforested areas and to those that are at higher risk of deforestation in the near future?The researchers determined the maximum distance between each slaughterhouse and its suppliers by interviewing local managers by phone, then crossing data. There were extreme cases at both ends of the spectrum, including one plant in the state of Acre which did not buy cattle raised any farther away than 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) from their door. On the other extreme, a slaughterhouse in the state of Amazonas acquired animals from more than 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) away to compensate for a local livestock shortage during the dry season.The study dealt with two slaughterhouse categories: those with a state license, which allows them to sell meat within their states; and those with a federal license, allowing the firms to sell country-wide and for export. On average, meatpacking plants with state licenses have the capacity to slaughter 180 animals per day, and buy from farms that can be up to 153 kilometers (95 miles) away. Plants with national licenses can slaughter 700 animals per day, brought from up to 360 kilometers (223 miles) away.The next step in the analysis process, based on the maximum pasture to meat processing plant distances, was to establish the potential area that supplied each slaughterhouse — a goal accomplished with geospatial technology.Satellite image of the JBS slaughterhouse in Santana do Araguaia, in the state of Pará, Brazil. Photo courtesy of Google Earth“Imazon has an extensive database of formal and informal roads in the Amazon, which has been updated since 2008,” says Amintas Brandão Jr., a study co-author. “We ran a spatial analysis in which you insert the coordinates of the slaughterhouse in the software and its maximum buying distance, say 100 kilometers. Then the software automatically goes through all the roads and navigable rivers accessible to that slaughterhouse up to those 100 kilometers distant. Thus, we have been able to delineate a potential supply zone.” According to Brandão, this was the study’s novelty: it establishes each slaughterhouse’s area of ​​influence using the infrastructure network — the systems of roads and navigable rivers through which cattle can be transported.Importantly, the total pasture zone of influence corresponding to all 128 analyzed slaughterhouses covers almost the entirety of areas embargoed due to deforestation by Ibama, the federal agency that polices environmental offenses. It also matches 88 percent of all deforestation that occurred in the Amazon between 2010 and 2015.Future deforestationAlso importantly, the study generated a forecast of the most likely future deforested areas in the Brazilian Amazon.Again, the researchers utilized geospatial analysis software. They divided the entire region into a grid of 1 kilometer-wide squares. The probability of future deforestation was estimated for each square based on the presence of factors that stimulate forest destruction, such as available roads or rivers for transportation, distance to markets, and land production potential. Using this data, they created a map of deforestation probability for the entire Brazilian Amazon. Then the researchers used the deforested area for the three previous years — 1.7 million hectares (17,000 square kilometers; 6,564 square miles) — as an estimate of total forest loss that can happen in the three year period between 2016 to 2018. Based on this probability map, they determined the areas under higher risk of new deforestation. The last step was to overlap these projections and the slaughterhouses’ zones of potential supply. The match between the two was 90 percent.In other words, if the current deforestation rates are repeated between 2016 and 2018, 90 percent of new forest loss will occur within the estimated cattle supply zone of ​​128 slaughterhouses.If the Amazon’s current deforestation rate is repeated between 2016 and 2018, then 90 percent of new forest loss will occur within the estimated cattle supply zone of the 128 slaughterhouses. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayConsequences and solutions“From the surveillance point of view, this work can help control deforestation by showing where its hot spots are,” says Brandão.According to Barreto, “it is impressive how small is the number of slaughterhouse firms that sit at the end of a [cattle supply] chain that involves almost 400,000 ranchers.” For him, this confirms that the best way to reduce forest loss due to livestock is to involve the slaughterhouses in the deforestation surveillance, as the MPF agreements require.But Barreto also points out problems with this approach: 30 percent of the slaughters are done by meat processing firms that have not signed the Beef Agreement. That means that these firms do not inspect the place of origin of their cattle. Worse, these slaughterhouses are located in the same area of ​​activity as those who have signed the agreement, thus becoming alternatives for the sale of cattle raised in illegally opened pastures.Imazon’s study created a detailed picture of the influence that slaughterhouses can have on deforestation. “We already have a map, and the technologies are available to trace cattle from the ranches where they are bred all the way to intermediate fattening ranches, and to the slaughter sites,” says Barreto. “Now, we need consistent legal pressure and punishment for breeders and meatpackers who condone environmental crimes.”This sort of pressure, he says, came from the market itself in the case of foot-and-mouth disease, when the cattle industry realized that it would lose global markets if an effective vaccination program wasn’t implemented. The pinch from the market led farmers to organize themselves and to partner with the government to effectively control foot-and-mouth disease, which was quite a feat.Likewise, if the government and slaughterhouses have the will, he says, then they can work together to end ranching activities that bring down forests. For Barreto, a good starting point for reducing deforestation would be the creation of a new round of beef sector law enforcement pressure administered by the MPF and Ibama. Such a move would be a huge step toward achieving zero deforestation in the Amazon.This article was originally published in Portuguese by ((o))eco and can be found here. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The new study forecasts that serious Amazon deforestation will likely continue to occur unless effective enforcement policies are adopted to monitor and control the pasture usage of the region’s slaughterhouses. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Biodiversity Hotspots, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Meat, Monitoring, Pasture, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Ranching, Roads, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Brazil’s Indians on the march in last ditch effort to stop land theft

first_imgLast week, indigenous organizations and civil society bodies demonstrated widely against what they see as the Brazilian government’s on going moves to reduce Indian land rights, and to demand the government open a dialogue with indigenous representatives.Of greatest concern is President Temer’s recommendation to approve the “marco temporal” a 1988 cut-off date for Indian occupation of traditional lands.Critics say the marco temporal is designed to deny indigenous land rights guaranteed under Brazil’s 1988 constitution, while legalizing claims of land thieves and wealthy elite ruralists who have long hungered for control of Indian lands.Brazilian Supreme Court rulings that will help determine the legality of the marco temporal are expected this Wednesday, 16 August. Indians protest in Brasilia last week against the Temer government’s assault on indigenous land rights guaranteed by the 1988 constitution. Photo courtesy of Guilherme Cavalli / CimiBrazil’s Indians were on the march all of last week, carrying out major demonstrations, public meetings and hearings, culminating on 9 August, the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. The protests came in response to perceived attempts by the Temer government to delegitimize indigenous land rights assured by the nation’s 1988 constitution — legal maneuvering by the government which most critics say would largely benefit wealthy Brazilians trying to lay claim to traditional Indian lands.The week culminated with the dispatch of a series of documents, along with an accompanying letter signed by 48 indigenous organizations and civil society bodies, addressed to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, part of the Organization of American States (OAS).The letter condemns the growing pace of indigenous rights violations in Brazil since the visit of Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the UN’s special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, in March 2016. It notes that “violent attacks on the indigenous communities and people have continued to grow, revealing a high level of racism.”According to the letter, the increasing number of violations is the result of “the deliberate weakening of the indigenous agency, Funai; the government’s refusal to demarcate indigenous land; and the complete absence of dialogue between the government and indigenous representatives.”Indians demonstrating against the “marco temporal” in Brasilia. Photo courtesy of Guilherme Cavalli / CimiThe 48 organizations call on the government to put an end to the criminalization of indigenous leaders, to re-open dialogue with indigenous organizations, to revoke laws that violate indigenous rights, and to make the justice system accessible to indigenous people.Above all, Brazil’s indigenous people have called on the Temer administration to re-think its recent recommendation that all government departments, including Funai, accept the so-called ‘marco temporal’ — a cut-off date fixed at 5 October 1988, the day that Brazil’s most recent constitution was promulgated. According to the new guidance, no indigenous group will be able to claim land they were not occupying on this particular date.Many Indians see this date as arbitrary and unfair because it comes shortly after the end of 25 years of military rule during which many indigenous groups were brutally evicted from lands they had occupied for decades or even centuries. The cut-off date, they say, legitimizes military abuses of indigenous human rights. The 1988 date also favors land thieves, cattle ranchers, soy farmers, mining companies, and other interests among wealthy elite ruralists who have long coveted indigenous lands, say experts.An indian taking part in the ceremony last week at the Brazilian Supreme Court. Photo by Tiago Motto / CimiOn 8 August the Indians held a public hearing in the Senate in Brasilia. “If the marco temporal is approved, the massacres, the spilling of blood, the genocide, the evictions that we are suffering in our lands today, will also be approved,” warned Eliseu Lopes Guarani Kaioawá, a member of the ruling body of the Articulation of Indigenous People in Brazil (Apib). “Our history doesn’t begin in 1988!” he declared.The marco temporal “is absolutely unsustainable and rotten in its very base,” said Luciano Mariz Maia, from the Federal Public MInistry (MPF), an independent branch of government made up of public prosecutors at both the federal and state level.On the same day, a public debate was held at the University of São Paulo. “The marco temporal is unconstitutional. Our rights as the original inhabitants are recognized in the Constitution. We must shout this out loud and clear,” said Tiago Honório dos Santos, a member of the Guarani Yvyrupa Commission and an inhabitant of the Tenondé Porã indigenous territoryAnthropologist Manuela Carneiro da Cunha declared that Brazil is currently dominated by a “president who doesn’t care how unpopular he is, and is capable of doing anything to remain in power. It is in this way that agribusiness is getting everything it wants.”Anthropologist Manuela Carneiro da Cunha said that Brazil’s President Temer “doesn’t care how unpopular he is, and is capable of doing anything to remain in power. It is in this way that agribusiness is getting everything it wants.” Photo courtesy of YouTubeThe week culminated in an indigenous ceremony, led by the Guarani and Kaiowá Indians, in front of the Federal Supreme Court (STF) building. The site was chosen because on 16 August the STF is due to make several important rulings, one of which will directly affect the marco temporal.“We are asking the eleven STF ministers not to approve this,” said Leila Rocha Guarani Nhandeva, a leader from the Yvy Katu indigenous territory. “If need be, I’ll kneel before minister Cármen Lúcia [president of the STF], begging her not to approve it.”The ruling in question concerns the civil proceeding (AC0 469) brought by Funai against the Rio Grande do Sul government. Funai is asking for the cancellation of land rights given to private owners within land traditionally occupied by the Kaingang Indians.Cármen Lúcia, president of the Brazilian Supreme Court (STF), which will make important rulings this week that will impact Indian rights in Brazil. Those decisions could also seriously impact deforestation in the Amazon, because indigenous groups have proven to be the best stewards of the land there. Photo courtesy of the STF.Evicted from their land decades ago and confined within tiny plots, the Kaingang Indians tried unsuccessfully during the military government to reoccupy their traditional territory. They only succeeded after the approval of the 1988 Constitution, which strengthened indigenous rights. They finally got their land demarcated in the 1990s.However, as they were not living on their land in 1988, the marco temporal recommendation would appear to legally deny them all claims to occupy what is widely recognized as their ancestral territory.Many indigenous leaders see this week’s ruling by the Supreme Court as a litmus test. “This marco temporal allows landowners to invade land that is demarcated, and to prevent land that is not demarcated from ever being demarcated,” said Hozana Puruborá, an indigenous leader from the state of Rondônia. “It is bringing a great deal of violence to indigenous lands. We ask the Supreme Court to bury it once and for all.”If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the marco temporal, many experts believe that an increase in indigenous conflict is inevitable.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Guarani and Kaiowá indians participating in the ceremony at the Supreme Court building. Photo courtesy of Tiago Miotto / Cimi Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Pasture, Protests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Ranching, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Seychelles home to new species of caecilian, a legless amphibian

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon The Petite Praslin caecilian (Hypogeophis pti) is the world’s newest — and possibly the smallest — caecilian, a type of legless amphibian.Scientists discovered the animal on the island of Praslin in the Seychelles, an archipelago in the Indian Ocean.The new species is the seventh caecilian species found in the Seychelles, where the amphibians have been evolving for 64 million years. A team of scientists from Seychelles, the United States and the United Kingdom has found a new caecilian, perhaps the smallest species of the legless amphibian on Earth.“As soon as I saw it I knew it was a new species,” Simon Maddock, a conservation biologist at the University of Wolverhampton, said in a statement. “[It] is a very exciting discovery and I was delighted to be able to formally describe it and present it to the world.”Biologist Simon Maddock led the team that discovered the new species in Seychelles. Photo courtesy of Simon Maddock / University of Wolverhampton.Maddock and his colleagues discovered what they’re calling the Petite Praslin caecilian (Hypogeophis pti), named for the island of Praslin in the Seychelles where they found it in 2013 and 2014. They reported their findings Oct. 6 in the journal Zootaxa.The species has a longer snout than other Seychellois caecilians. Caecilians also have two sensory organs on their heads not found in other amphibians called tentacles. The Petite Praslin caecilian’s tentacles are nearer to the animal’s eyes than its nostrils, differentiating it from a close relative. The new species also has fewer vertebrae than any caecilian known to science, and it’s short, topping out at 120 millimeters (4.72 inches) in length.The archipelago in the Indian Ocean is home to six other species of caecilian, and scientists figure they’ve been evolving there independently, along with a family of frogs called Sooglossidae, for 64 million years. Still, that doesn’t mean the snake-like amphibians are easy to find.“Caecilians are common in the Seychelles but they are not widely known to people because they live underground,” Maddock said. “This new species has not been encountered on other islands during hundreds of hours of dedicated caecilian surveys between 1976 and 2017.”The petite Praslin caecilian (Hypogeophis pti) has only been found on the island of Praslin in the Seychelles. Photo courtesy of Simon Maddock / University of Wolverhampton.That fact led the team to surmise that caecilians are endemic to Praslin, meaning they’re found nowhere else on the planet. Their tiny range also makes these caecilians particularly susceptible to the threat of extinction. Several recent amphibian die-offs in the Seychelles make the status of the Petite Praslin caecilian, as well that of other native amphibians, doubly concerning to scientists like Maddock.In September, he was part of team trying to track down the causes of these threats to amphibian survival in the Seychelles. Around 30 percent of amphibians face the global specter of extinction, according to the IUCN, as habitat loss, invasive species and diseases have taken their toll. A disease-causing fungus called chytrid has been particularly devastating, but so far it hasn’t shown up in the islands. With amphibians in crisis nearly everywhere, Maddock emphasized the need for conservation in places that are rich in amphibian species.“Considering the global importance of Seychelles’ amphibians, along with the recently observed mortality events, and the elevated threat posed by disease, an emergency response and effective strategy are required,” he said in a statement. “The extinction of any Seychelles amphibian would be a major loss to global biodiversity.”The Seychelles is home to seven known species of caecilian. Photo by John C. Cannon.CITATIONMaddock, S. T., Wilkinson, M., Nussbaum, R. A., & Gower, D. J. (2017). A new species of small and highly abbreviated caecilian (Gymnophiona: Indotyphlidae) from the Seychelles island of Praslin, and a recharacterization of Hypogeophis brevis Boulenger, 1911. Zootaxa, 4329(4), 301-326.Banner image of a Petite Praslin caecilian courtesy of Simon Maddock / University of Wolverhampton.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amphibian Crisis, Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Deforestation, Diseases, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Evolution, Extinction, Frogs, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Islands, Iucn, Mass Extinction, New Species, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Sixth Mass Extinction, Species, Species Discovery, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Damming or damning the Amazon: Assessing Ecuador / China cooperation

first_imgAmazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, China And Energy, China’s Demand For Resources, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Featured, Flooding, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherer In 2008, Ecuador, led by President Rafael Correa, approved a new constitution based upon Buen Vivir (the ”Good Life”), committing the nation to indigenous rights, environmental sustainability and state sovereignty. However, Correa quickly aligned the nation with China, a partnership that many critics say undermined the promises of the constitution.Under Correa, China became Ecuador’s primary creditor and Chinese investment, both public and private, resulted in an infrastructure boom in new dams, mines, oilrigs, roads, power transmission lines, telecommunications systems and schools.During Correa’s administration, eight major dams were built, including Coca Coda Sinclair (CCS) constructed by Chinese state corporation Sinohydro. While CCS promised local prosperity, residents of surrounding communities say the government provided them with no say in the project, which has created serious environmental problems.In May, a new president, Lenin Moreno, was elected. He has so far not followed in Correa’s footsteps, and his administration seems set on deemphasizing the relationship with China, with few major infrastructure projects currently in the works. However a power struggle in the ruling Alianza País Party has made Ecuador’s political path forward less than clear. The Coca River in Ecuador, site of the Coca Codo Sinclair dam. Photo by AgenciaAndes on Visual Hunt / CC BY-SAA year ago this month, the Coca Codo Sinclair (CSS) dam began operation. The hydroelectric project, built by Chinese state corporation Sinohydro at a cost of $2.24 billion and managed by the Ecuadorian state electric company (CELEC), is the largest infrastructure project in Ecuadorian history, as well as being one of its most environmentally and socially controversial.The Ecuadorian Ministry of Electricity and Renewable Resources says that CCS has an operating capacity of 1,500 megawatts (MW), and is projected to produce roughly 8,734 gigawatt hours (GWh) of electricity per year — 30 percent of the country’s annual electricity needs. The government claims $600 million in oil imports will be saved each year as a result of the dam’s construction, and the country aims to become a net electricity exporter.CCS is the largest of a series of Ecuadorian development projects financed and constructed by Chinese actors in the past decade. China has become the country’s primary creditor and Chinese investment, both public and private, has resulted in an infrastructure boom in new dams, mines, oilrigs, roads, power transmission lines, telecommunications systems and schools.While scattered across Ecuador, Chinese infrastructure projects are predominantly concentrated in the Amazonian half of the country. These projects embody contemporary Ecuadorian development: bold, yet mired in conflict and secrecy. So how did the nation get here under the leadership of President Rafael Correa, and where does the future lie under President Lenin Moreno — and will China continue to play an outsized role?Ecuador’s Coca Codo Sinclair dam during construction. Photo by http://www.presidencia.gob.ec/ on VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SABuen Vivir: A bold model for sustainable development?In 2008, Ecuador’s governing Alianza País Party, following the election of Rafael Correa to the presidency, wrote a new constitution predicated upon Buen Vivir (the ”Good Life”) committing the country to indigenous rights, environmental sustainability and state sovereignty.Correa praised the codification of indigenous and environmental values into law as the defining features of Ecuadorian development, nationhood and identity, and proclaimed that a “Citizen’s Revolution” was underway.Central to the Correa Administration’s development plans (called the National Plans for Buen Vivir) was a realignment of the energy matrix. Through energy diversification, the country sought to reduce dependency on both Western creditors and on a petro economy that Correa felt was bleeding state revenue for the advantage of foreign transnationals.The benefits of clean energy development were marketed as transformative. Building megaprojects would create quality jobs and generate profits that could be used to fund massive social and poverty-alleviating education, health and cash transfer programs.The Correa Administration promoted a conception of dams as bringers of prosperity and industrialization, and then-Minister of Energy and Mining Alberto Acosta lauded the proposed CCS dam for the role it would play in ensuring Ecuador’s “energy sovereignty.” In 2012 the government released a nine-year Master Plan for Electrification detailing large-scale investments in hydropower, including the construction of eight hydroelectric dams in the Ecuadorian Amazon – all of which have been built.“Ecuador was being robbed on two fronts before Correa was elected,” a local communities leader near CCS (and a former CELEC employee) said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “The state was subsidizing hydroelectric projects to pay for oil debts, while at the same time subsidizing energy imports. Gaining more energy independence was the best thing the Correa government did.”The town of Simon Bolívar in Ecuador’s Sucumbios Province, near the entrance to the Coca Codo Sinclair hydroelectric project. Locals say they were given virtually no say in the development of the CCS hydroelectric project. Photo by Max NathansonThe good life gone wrongObservers, looking back, note how Alianza País coopted Buen Vivir’s optimistic ideology to strengthen the party’s ruling position. In reality, Correa consolidated power and initiated an elite-led industrial planning process that short circuited many constitutional provisions guaranteeing local community participation and consent in development projects.“In the party, Correa effectively created a new political-economic elite protected by law through his new constitution,” said a former Petroecuador executive who also spoke on condition of anonymity. “Correa didn’t try to create a development strategy for four, eight, or even 12 years. He wanted the party to be in power for a hundred.”Researchers at the University of Amsterdam have discussed how, through its use and branding of Buen Vivir, the government equated infrastructure construction and resource extraction with nationhood, or “la patria.” Correa created an environment where opposition to projects that the government dubbed “strategic” to national development was equivalent to opposing the nation itself.While Correa’s first years saw improvements in health, education and literacy indicators, a sharp drop in commodity prices and recession in 2013 revealed the shaky foundation of Ecuador’s economy: a twin reliance on oil and Chinese finance.A 2015 study by the International Renewable Energy Agency found that — despite the stated rhetoric of “changes to the productive matrix,” including a 60 percent renewables target by 2017, and proposed exploration of biomass, geothermal solar and wind energy generation — the percentage of oil production comprising Ecuador’s power supply, electricity generation, and total energy consumption actually increased between 2000 and 2012.Inside the generation center of the Coca Codo Sinclair hydroelectric project. Photo by Max NathansonChina dominates lending and investment in EcuadorCorrea’s daring development proposals were popular but not without negative consequences. Upon assuming office, the president declared $3.2 billion of Ecuador’s foreign debt “illegitimate,” saying the time had come for Western “monsters” to stop oppressing the country.While this move turned out to be somewhat successful in alleviating Ecuador’s foreign debt obligations, international markets and creditors did not respond kindly. Correa was labeled a pariah by many international policymakers and financiers, and Ecuador faced a shortage of credit from its traditional lenders.Following the debt cancellation, China presented itself as a lender of last resort.The two countries found common ground ideologically, under their shared self-identification as “21st century socialist” developing countries. They also served each other’s economic needs, with China providing the seemingly endless lines of credit that Ecuador so badly required, and with Ecuador offering a potentially profitable outlet for Chinese state enterprises and domestic industrial overcapacity.Many authorities attribute the close China/Ecuador ties to China’s enormous population and thirst for natural resources. However, revelations that Chinese state-owned oil companies were simply rerouting Ecuadorian oil to the United States cast doubt on that narrative. Instead of using Ecuadorian oil to fuel the Chinese economic machine, Petrochina sold it in regional markets for profit.A control panel inside the generation center of the CCS project. Photo by Max NathansonThe Sino-Ecuadorian blueprint: Amazon megaprojects In practice, Ecuador’s Buen Vivir plans revolved largely around the development of hydropower and “responsible mining” in the Amazon region. These projects were mostly funded through a combination of Chinese capital and oil proceeds.Ecuador’s attraction to top-down infrastructure construction mirrors that of China, which has long made it state policy to equate large-scale infrastructure investment with economic growth. This approach has roots in modernization theory, where major government-driven infrastructure projects are touted widely as symbols of economic development and human manipulation of nature. Such a mindset can be found in government propaganda enshrining the U.S. dams of the Tennessee Valley Authority during the Great Depression, as well as in the monumental infrastructure projects of Stalin’s Soviet Union.China’s infrastructure boom in recent decades has been dazzling yet costly in environmental, financial and social terms. In 2016, Oxford researchers concluded that “poorly managed infrastructure investments are a main explanation of surfacing economic and financial problems in China.” Those analysts concluded that “China’s infrastructure investment model is not one to follow for other countries but one to avoid.”In a similar vein, Amazonian hydropower megaprojects, especially in Brazil, have been shown to have dire environmental, social and fiscal consequences. Even recent claims that tropical hydropower provides a green improvement on fossil fuels has been debunked. Philip Fearnside, a leading hydropower expert, stated in 2016 that “tropical dams are often falsely portrayed as ‘clean’ [carbon] emissions-free energy sources. Calculations… show that emissions from storage hydroelectric dams would exceed those from electricity generation based on fossil fuels.”In a study of more than a hundred existing hydropower dams in the Amazon published in Nature, an international team of 16 academics asserted that “the accumulated negative environmental effects of existing dams and proposed dams, if constructed, will trigger massive hydrophysical and biotic disturbances that will affect the Amazon basin’s floodplains, estuary and sediment plume.” They also note that, “the social and environmental impacts of large dams are severe, disruptive and characteristically irreversible.”The El Reventador Volcano spews ash near the Coca Codo Sinclair hydroelectric project. The volcano sits atop a highly active seismic zone, in which CCS was built – a major safety concern, according to scientists. Photo by Max NathansonCCS: Correa’s idea of “sustainable development”Carolina Viola Reyes, professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador, wrote that projects like CCS “open a series of questions about [their] real impacts: on one side, about the country’s [economic] development, and on the other, concerning the territories and populations located in the area influenced by the projects.”The communities leader quoted earlier in this story told Mongabay that local communities surrounding the CCS construction site were opposed to it during the planning period, but were too small to challenge the power of the Correa Administration, which approved the environmental impact assessment for the CELEC Coca Codo Sinclair project through its Environment Ministry. “It would have been David versus Goliath,” said the leader.Basic geology puts that approval in question: the CCS dam sits within a highly seismically active zone beneath the El Reventador Volcano, an area that scientists have advised against developing since the 1970s.A 1998 proposal to construct on the current site was rejected because it failed to meet required environmental regulations.The former Petroecuador executive related how earthquakes in 1986, 2010 and 2012 caused significant damage to properties, homes and businesses surrounding the CCS site, an area containing a population of roughly 2,000 people.Concerns over the dam’s vulnerability to seismic activity persist. “If there was another earthquake, or a significant eruption, it would be catastrophic,” a CELEC employee told Mongabay.Observed environmental impacts of the CCS dam include increased sedimentation above the dam, and significantly lowered water flows in the Napo and Coca Rivers below the site, which has threatened fish supplies and led to the likely severe diminishing of the San Rafael Waterfall, one of Ecuador’s primary tourist attractions. One section of the Coca River has vanished directly downstream from a subterranean tunnel drilled 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) through the bedrock, a tunnel through which the river’s water is routed to the project’s turbines.The Coca River directly downstream from the Coca Codo Sinclair hydroelectric project’s diversion station. Water levels here have been diminished to the vanishing point, impacting fishing and habitat. Photo by Max NathansonThe San Rafael Waterfalls, a major Ecuadoran tourist attraction on the Coca River downstream from the Coca Codo Sinclair dam’s diversion station. It is feared that water diverted for the dam’s turbines will destroy the waterfalls’ economic value and hurt the local tourist trade. Photo by Max NathansonAn independent study of the environmental impact assessment submitted for CCS (and prepared by Sinohydro) enumerated a variety of adverse affects, including deforestation; improper waste removal impacting domestic water supplies; changes in subterranean runoff; fluctuations in water flows, sediment levels, and flood patterns; and threats to flora and fauna in the surrounding Cayambe-Coca National Park and Sumaco Natural Reserve.Multiple senior state officials have recounted how the government purposefully did not enforce labor and safety regulations during CCS construction at the behest of Chinese officials running the project, a situation that not only eroded local labor relations but also resulted in 13 deaths during construction. These regulatory lapses caused a nine-month delay in construction.On a tour of the CCS power generators, inserted deep into the side of a mountain, this reporter observed leaks springing out of the walls all around the turbines, while small streams of water ran beneath the feet of workers attending to electrical panels – a potential work hazard. When asked about the source of the leaks, the CELEC guide laughed, saying: “it’s a dam – there’s water everywhere!”CELEC and the Ecuadorian Environment Ministry told Mongabay that all relevant environmental and social regulations were followed in the planning and construction of CCS. Sinohydro did not respond to requests for comment.A Coca Codo Sinclair hydroelectric project transmission station. Photo by Max NathansonThe CCS legacyThe CELEC guide listed CCS benefits to nearby communities, including the building of 50 kilometers (31 miles) of paved roads and the employment of “many” Ecuadorians. The new roads do have economic benefits, with the local government expanding the road network and adding new side roads that allow farmers in rural area to get their goods to market more easily.With regard to employment, locals say that during the seven years of dam construction there were anywhere from five to ten thousand workers in the CCS area. This number was split between Chinese and Ecuadorian laborers, with most Ecuadorians being engineers from Quito. Almost none of this labor came from local communities, however, and the workforce lived in special camps built near the dam site.CELEC’s and Sinohydro’s contribution to nearby communities was a soccer field and a school. According to a local resident, a boarded-up building near one of the abandoned camps had been used as a brothel for Chinese laborers. “It was always a good time at ‘The University,’” he told Mongabay.Ecuador’s Coca Codo Sinclair dam, built by Chinese state corporation Sinohydro. Photo by amalavida.tv on VisualHunt.com / CC BY-SAAn abandoned Sinohydro camp near the CCS dam. While the construction of the dam required thousands of workers, few came from local communities. Photo by Max NathansonThe way forward under MorenoWhile the construction of large dams like CCS often can result in a tradeoff between national development and socio-environmental welfare, alternative energy solutions exist. A CELEC official noted that the current Lenin Moreno led government is exploring the country’s significant geothermal potential with the aid of an $8 million Japanese loan. However, the same official then followed up with an excited pitch for a new 5,000 MW dam (more than three times the size of CCS) in the final stages of planning by Sinohydro on the Zamora River in Ecuador’s southern Amazon region.Other than the Zamora River dam, there is little to point to in terms of concrete infrastructure policy since President Moreno’s election in May; most of his energy to date has gone into distancing himself from Correa and those loyal to the ex-president in the Alianza País Party. Observers believe the most likely Chinese investments under Moreno will come in the form of acquisitions, not through the development of new projects. However, steps made so far by the administration have been secretive and shrouded in a cloud of rumor.Multiple government officials told Mongabay that the Moreno administration is trying to find ways to diversify away from Chinese investment, including new attempts at debt renegotiation. Additionally and not trivially, Moreno is facing a serious challenge to his leadership within the party, having been removed from his position as party leader (filled by former Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño). Some experts even believe that Correa could be back in power in some form very soon.In conclusion, Chinese investment and large infrastructure development seem likely to be limited for the near future. It also remains difficult to know whether the Correa administration’s close relationship with Chinese banks is now being threatened by Moreno’s attempt to shift the country’s political trajectory. What seems clear to critics is that Correa’s single-minded infatuation with Chinese-built infrastructure projects helped put Ecuador in the current uncertain political, fiscal and environmental bind that it finds itself today.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New research might finally establish true identity of the mysterious Yeti

first_imgBits of hair and old bones purported to belong to a Yeti have been collected throughout the years, and an untold number of people have claimed to have seen one of the creatures, or at least its footprints, firsthand. Yet documented proof of the Yeti and its species identity has remained elusive.New research might finally answer the question of what the Yeti really is, however. An international team of scientists led by Tianying Lan of the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed 24 samples of bone, feces, hair, and skin from the Tibetan Plateau-Himalaya region that either belonged to a bear or, allegedly, a Yeti.Researchers determined that all of the Yeti samples they collected for their study came from the bear species that call the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding Himalayan mountains home, except for one specimen collected from a stuffed exhibit in a museum that they determined had come from a dog The legend of the Yeti, a mysterious, ape-like, bipedal creature rumored to live in the Himalayas, has persisted for centuries.Tales of the mythical beast first made their way to the Western world in the 19th century, though the Abominable Snowman, as the Yeti also came to be referred to, really laid a firm claim on Westerners’ imaginations in the mid-20th century, around the same time that mountaineers like Eric Shipton, Sir Edmund Hillary, and Tenzing Norgay were attempting to scale Mt. Everest and other mountains in the area. But the Yeti has been part of local folklore for much longer, even being worshipped as a god of the hunt by some pre-Buddhist peoples of the region.Bits of hair and old bones purported to belong to a Yeti have been collected throughout the years, and an untold number of people have claimed to have seen one of the creatures, or at least its footprints, firsthand. Yet documented proof of the Yeti and its species identity has remained elusive, of course.New research might finally answer the question of what the Yeti really is, however. A study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B yesterday seeks to shed light on the identity of the elusive Yeti by examining the evolutionary history of local bear species.An international team of scientists led by Tianying Lan of the University at Buffalo in New York analyzed 24 samples of bone, feces, hair, and skin from the Tibetan Plateau-Himalaya region that either belonged to a bear or, allegedly, a Yeti.Photograph of an alleged yeti footprint found by Michael Ward. Photograph was taken at Menlung glacier on the Everest expedition by Eric Shipton in 1951. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.They are not the first to examine DNA evidence to try and determine who or what the Yeti might be. A 2014 genetic analysis of 30 hair samples that had been attributed to “anomalous primates” like the yeti, bigfoot, and others, examined three hair samples supposedly belonging to the mythical Himalayan creature and found that they were either a match for an ancient polar bear species or a goat-like animal called the serow.The researchers behind that 2014 study speculated that perhaps there was an undiscovered bear species, possibly a hybrid of a polar bear and another bear, roaming the Himalayas, which had given rise to the Yeti legend. Lan and team were able to find a sample similar to the one examined for the previous study and found a much simpler explanation. They write that “we unambiguously show that this sample is from a bear that groups with extant Himalayan brown bear.”Lan and colleagues were also able to determine that all of the other Yeti samples they collected for their study came from the bear species that call the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding Himalayan mountains home, except for one specimen collected from a stuffed exhibit in a museum that they determined had come from a dog. “This study represents the most rigorous analysis to date of samples suspected to derive from anomalous or mythical ‘hominid’-like creatures, strongly suggesting the biological basis of the yeti legend as local brown and black bears,” they write.In the process, the researchers helped shed light on the evolutionary history of Himalayan and Tibetan brown bears and the Himalayan black bear. They say their results support a previous finding that Himalayan brown bears, together with Gobi bears and Deosai bears, form a “sister lineage” to all other extant brown bear clades. “This result strongly supports Himalayan brown bears as a relict population that diverged early from other brown bear populations,” they note.Purported Yeti scalp at Khumjung monastery. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5.Their results also “strongly support” the conclusion that Tibetan brown bears are descendants of ancestral Eurasian brown bears that migrated to the Tibetan Plateau and have since remained geographically isolated from their source population.Meanwhile, the Himalayan black bear, they write, represents a sister lineage to all other Asian black bears: “Although sampling is limited, this result indicates that the Himalayan black bear originated from an ancient lineage and experienced long isolation in the Himalayan Mountains, a similar scenario to the divergence of the Himalayan brown bear lineage.”Study co-author Charlotte Lindqvist, a scientist with the University at Buffalo who is currently a visiting associate professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, told CNN that, while this may not be the outcome Yeti fans were hoping for, the study still yielded some compelling results.“We didn’t set out to debunk the myth. We were open-minded, and we did learn something,” Lindqvist said. “I’m not an expert in the Yeti legend, I’m not an anthropologist, but as someone who works with genetics, I thought this is the kind of work that could tell an interesting story.”Illustration of a Yeti by Philippe Semeria. Licensed under CC BY 3.0.CITATIONSLan, T., Gill, S., Bellemain, E., Bischof, R., Nawaz, M.A., & Lindqvist, C. (2017). Evolutionary history of enigmatic bears in the Tibetan Plateau-Himalaya Region and the identity of the Yeti. Proc. R. Soc. B 20171804. doi:10.1098/rspb.2017.1804Sykes, B. C., Mullis, R. A., Hagenmuller, C., Melton, T. W., & Sartori, M. (2014, August). Genetic analysis of hair samples attributed to yeti, bigfoot and other anomalous primates. In Proc. R. Soc. B (Vol. 281, No. 1789, p. 20140161). doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.0161Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001 Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bears, DNA, Environment, Genetics, Mammals, Research, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

India pushes for its largest ever hydropower project despite concerns

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta India’s hydropower sector has come back into focus with the government clearing the path for the controversial, large-scale Dibang hydropower project in Arunachal Pradesh state.The project, estimated to cost about $4 billion, is expected to be the highest dam in India once completed and aimed at preventing flooding in downstream areas. It’s controversial for its proposed felling of trees and possible impact on local communities, ecology, environment and wildlife of the area.In its focus on the hydropower sector, the Indian government has also introduced a bill to parliament on dam safety, to regulate the more than 5,600 existing dams in India, some of them more than 100 years old, and the nearly 4,700 under construction. Hydropower projects are back in focus in India, with the government declaring in the past sixth months that large hydropower projects would have renewable energy status. The government has also brought in a dam safety bill.And now, it’s paved the way for the progress of the controversial 2,880-megawatt Dibang hydropower project in the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, believed to be the largest hydroelectric project and highest dam to be constructed in India.On July 17, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA), led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, approved the “expenditure on pre-investment activities and various clearances for Dibang Multipurpose Project (MPP) in Arunachal Pradesh” for an amount of 16 billion rupees ($232 million). The total estimated cost of the project is 280 billion rupees ($4 billion), with a timeline of nine years to completion from the receipt of government approval.Envisaged as a storage-based hydroelectric project with flood moderation as the key objective, the Dibang MPP will be located on the eponymous river and valley district of Arunachal Pradesh, featuring a 278-meter (912-foot) concrete gravity dam. The construction of the dam, by the state-controlled National Hydroelectric Power Corporation (NHPC), is expected to prevent flooding in downstream areas.With the environment, defense and the first level of forest clearance already in place, the project, as per an official statement, is awaiting final-stage forest clearance for investment approval from the government, which would enable the developers to provide compensation for land acquisition and resettlement of affected families, undertake compensatory afforestation, and other investments.In addition to the mandated resettlement and rehabilitation (R&R) plan for affected families, the project proposes to invest 2.41 billion rupees ($35 million) on community and social development and addressing concerns raised by the local community during the public hearings. “It is also proposed to spend an amount of 32.7 million rupees [$475,000] on a plan for the protection of culture and identity of local people,” the statement added.The project has been in the making for more than a decade now, with the then Prime Minister Manmohan Singh laying the foundation stone for it in 2008, and has been controversial throughout.It would involve felling of more than 300,000 trees, which would disrupt the habitat of wildlife such as elephants (Elephas maximus), hoolock gibbons (Hoolock spp.), clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), tigers (Panthera tigris), fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and Himalayan black bears (Ursus thibetanus laniger) that have the highest protection under the country’s wildlife laws.The hydropower project will be located in the lower Dibang Valley, close to Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary in Arunachal Pradesh. Image by Rohit Naniwadekar via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).The project was previously rejected twice by the environment ministry’s forest advisory committee (FAC) — in July 2013 and April 2014 — on account of environmental and social concerns. In the first rejection, the FAC noted that “ecological, environmental and social costs of diversion of such a vast tract of forest land, which is a major source of livelihood of the tribal population of the state, will far outweigh the benefits likely to accrue from the project.”In the second rejection, the FAC said the area had a large number of endemic and endangered flora and fauna. But the first stage of forest clearance was finally approved in September 2014 without any major change in the plan, likely due to pressure from other sections of the government.A case against environment clearances associated with the Dibang project had even reached the National Green Tribunal, which hears environmental disputes, but was dismissed in November 2018.The former secretary of the water resources ministry, Shashi Shekhar, said there were doubts about the Dibang project’s feasibility.“Will the Dibang project be successful in serving the flood protection aspect?” Shekhar told Mongabay India. “I have serious doubts about that as it does not fit in the ecological knowledge and logic. The river carries snow-melt water and brings a huge amount of silt with it. The area also receives torrential rainfall and thus dislocates the soil and carries along with itself. It travels a short distance to reach Assam plains. Thus, any dam in the region there will soon get filled up with silt very soon. So, I have concerns about it.”Indigenous people living in the area have also been voicing their concerns.“There was a movement against the Dibang project but the Arunachal Pradesh government and the government of India successfully persuaded the locals to give up their land for proper compensation,” Ginko Lingi told Mongabay India. Lingi heads the Idu Mishmi Cultural and Literary Society, the apex body of the tribe of Dibang valley impacted by the hydropower project.“But the NHPC now has gone to the court against the compensation decided for the tribal community by the Arunachal Pradesh government,” Lingi said. “They are not giving compensation. We will be writing a letter to the NHPC authorities appealing them to settle the compensation to people of the Dibang valley district to start their project.”Large hydropower projects now a ‘renewable energy source’In March 2019, the Indian government granted large hydropower projects the status of “renewable energy source.” Previously, only hydropower projects of less than 25 MW were considered renewable energy projects.The measures announced by the government to promote the hydropower sector are expected to bolster India’s renewable power program. After this decision, the power generated from these projects can be brought under the non-solar renewable purchase obligation (RPO) and result in the better financial health of the projects.India has hydropower potential of 145,320 MW of which only about 45,400 MW have been utilized so far. In the past five years, only about 4,700 MW of hydropower capacity have been added; in the past 10 years, about 10,000 MW.India to finally get a dam safety actThe cabinet on July 17 also addressed the long-pending concern of dam safety, by clearing the 2019 dam safety bill for introduction to Parliament. The bill aims to help develop uniform countrywide procedures for ensuring the safety of the more than 5,600 dams that currently exist across India.According to an official statement, the Dam Safety Bill 2019 includes regular inspection of dams, emergency action plans, comprehensive dam safety reviews, adequate repair and maintenance funds for dam safety, instrumentation and safety manuals.The bill provides for the establishment of a national dam safety regulatory authority to implement the policy, guidelines and standards for dam safety, the statement said, as well as the establishment of state committees and state dam safety organizations for carrying out detailed safety-related works. The onus of dam safety lies on the dam owner, the statement said, and provides for penal provisions for commissions and omissions of certain acts.Environment minister Prakash Javadekar, addressing reporters after the cabinet meeting, said the country has more than 5,000 dams, with nearly 4,700 under construction. “So, for the safety of around 10,000 dams, there has been no law. There are many dams which are over 100 years old while some are over 50 years old,” Javadekar said, adding the bill would lead to the process of inspections, reviews, emergency plans and expert advice for dams.In early July, 19 people were reported killed after a breach in the Tiware dam, in Maharashtra state. “The bill would go a long way in addressing such cases and ensuring the safety of dams,” Javadekar said.According to the government, about 75 percent of the large dams in India are more than 25 years old, and about 164 dams are more than 100 years old. A badly maintained, unsafe dam poses a threat to human life, flora and fauna, public and private assets, and the environment. India has had 36 dam failures in the past: 11 in the state of Rajasthan, 10 in Madhya Pradesh, five in Gujarat, four in Maharashtra, two in Andhra Pradesh and one each in Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Tamil Nadu and Odisha.Shekhar said the dam safety bill marked a very important development. “Unfortunately, for want of money, the work for finding the health of dams was not done so far,” he said. “It is a very important step as the safety of dams is directly related to the lives of people. Also, in the wake of climate change, in cases of heavy rains, the dams faces danger and could result in a breach. For instance, heavy rains led to Kerala floods. When dams get breached, there is a direct danger to human lives. Thus, this bill is important, as we need to develop safety protocols for dams as well as mechanism about time to release water from dams.”About 75 percent of India’s large dams are more than 25 years old. Image by Shahakshay58 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).This story was first published on July 25, 2019, by Mongabay-India. Biodiversity, Dams, Environment, Forests, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Extreme snowfall led to reproductive collapse in some Arctic wildlife in 2018

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Arctic Animals, Biodiversity, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Conservation, Environment, Extreme Weather, Research, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img In 2018, while the Arctic continued to see warmer summers and retreating snow cover in general because of rising global temperatures, there was also very heavy snowfall that kept several areas covered in “unusually large amounts of snow” even in late summer, when much of it should have melted.In northeast Greenland, one of the regions affected by the excessive snowfall, most animals and plants, including Arctic foxes and migratory shorebirds, failed to reproduce, researchers found.While one non-breeding year may not spell doom for Arctic wildlife, frequent extreme weather events like the one in 2018 could make it harder for Arctic species to bounce back and survive, the researchers warn. Plants and animals in the Arctic are adapted to harsh climatic conditions. But extreme weather events triggered by human-caused climate change are wreaking havoc on Arctic wildlife, a new study has found.Last year was a case in point. In general, the Arctic continued to see warmer summers and retreating snow cover because of rising global temperatures. But there was also very heavy snowfall that kept vast areas of the Arctic covered in “unusually large amounts of snow,” even in late summer, when much of it should have melted, researchers say. In northeast Greenland, one of the regions affected by the excessive snowfall, most animals and plants failed to reproduce.These patterns were particularly visible in Zackenberg in northeast Greenland, where researchers have spent the past 20 years extensively monitoring animals and plants across multiple taxa. Usually, by the end of July, much of Zackenberg is usually snowless and buzzing with life. The summer is also when plant growth and animal reproduction usually peak, the researchers say. But in 2018, around 45 percent of the region was still covered in snow during late July, and the researchers noted a nearly complete reproductive failure across the food web.The Zackenberg valley in Northeast Greenland in summer 2018. Huge amounts of snow still covered the ground in late June, when the snow-covered season usually comes to an end. Image by Lars Holst Hansen.The team did not observe any Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) cubs and almost no muskox (Ovibos moschatus) calves, for example. Flowers appeared so late in the season that seeds would likely not develop before the frost set in, the researchers write. There were considerably fewer migratory shorebirds in Zackenberg last year, and the few shorebird eggs that hatched did so too late. The chicks were unlikely to have had enough time to get sufficient resources to grow and prepare for migration, the researchers say. The team also found that some shorebirds had starved to death, likely because of the delayed appearance of their arthropod prey. This was something the researchers had never encountered before.One snow-filled year does not spell doom for Arctic wildlife. But frequent extreme weather events like the one in 2018 could make it harder for Arctic species to bounce back and survive, the researchers warn.“One non-breeding year is hardly that bad for high-arctic species,” Niels Martin Schmidt, lead author of the study and a senior researcher at Aarhus University, Denmark, said in a statement. “The worrying perspective is that 2018 may offer a peep into the future, where increased climatic variability may push the arctic species to — and potentially beyond — their limits.“Our study shows that climate change is more than ‘just’ warming, and that ecosystems may be hard hit by currently still rare but extreme events,” he added. “What it also brings out is the unparalleled value of long-term observations of the Arctic. Only by keeping an eye on full arctic ecosystems can we understand the havoc brought by the changing climate.”Arctic fox. Image by Emma via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).Citation:Schmidt, N. M., Reneerkens, J., Christensen, J.H., Olesen, M., Roslin, T. (2019) An ecosystem-wide reproductive failure with more snow in the Arctic. PLoS Biol 17(10): e3000392. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.3000392last_img read more