Rousaud: “Neymar’s return is possible, there will be devaluation”

first_imgRoussaud also raised the issue of reducing wages, stressing that Real Madrid or Juventus have made more cuts than Barcelona: “The sports management asked the players for an effort to lower wages. The players’ attitude was exemplary, but Real Madrid, Juventus or Bayern have made more extensive reductions.“Regarding the resignation of vice president of Barcelona, ​​he said: “Our resignation is what the press has called Barçagate. The club asked a company to deal with social networks and divided the contracts into five parts of € 200,000, to avoid controls by the club, which suffered financial damage for paying for these services at higher prices.And of the internal crisis that Barcelona suffers, he concluded: “Since January, many things have been done in an uncontrolled way. The club went for Xavi to Qatar to succeed Valverde, as everyone knows. That caused an internal conflict with the arrival of Setién to replace Valverde, in addition to Abidal’s statements about the players. Barcelona has had a terrible start to the year ”. Emili Rousaud was one of six executives who decided last week to resign, after disagreements with Bartomenu’s management in Barcelona. The former vice president of the Blaugrana group has given an exclusive interview to the newspaper L’Equipe, in which Neymar’s return to the Spanish League is possible.“A Neymar return is possible, as the market is going to suffer a devaluation and many teams are going to have significant economic losses. Barça want a return from Neymar. It will be necessary to analyze if this operation is possible with the financial situation of the club. Barça’s interest in him is real. I could seek a fractional payment to make the operation cheaper, ”he told the prestigious French newspaper.last_img read more

What happens when the soy and palm oil boom ends?

first_imgOver the past 30 years demand and production of oils crops like oil palm and soybeans has boomed across the tropics.This rapid expansion has in some places taken a heavy toll on native, wildlife-rich ecosystems.Derek Byerlee, co-author of a new book titled The Tropical Oil Crop Revolution, spoke with Mongabay about the tropical oil crop sector and what’s to come for the industry. Over the past thirty years demand and production of oils crops like oil palm and soybeans has boomed across the tropics thanks to rising incomes, macroeconomic changes and government policies, and substitution effects. This rapid expansion has in some places taken a heavy toll on native, wildlife-rich ecosystems—especially rainforests, wetlands, and savannas—while exacerbating conflicts over land. As a result, this growth has at times perplexed and dismayed ecologists, environmentalists, and human rights advocates.However there are signs that the bonanza may slow as it evolves in response to changing conditions including slackening demand, higher transactions costs for securing land, and productivity gains, argues The Tropical Oil Crop Revolution, a new book by Stanford University researchers Derek Byerlee, Walter P. Falcon, and Rosamond L. Naylor.Published in October 2016 by Oxford University Press, The Tropical Oil Crop Revolution chronicles the rise of the tropical oil crops, evaluates the costs and benefits of the industry, and makes projections for what the authors call “the world’s most dynamic agricultural sector in recent decades.”Byerlee discussed the book and its findings during a February 2017 interview with Mongabay.com.AN INTERVIEW WITH DEREK BYERLEEMongabay.com: What is your background and what led you to write this book?Derek ByerleeDerek Byerlee: I am an agricultural economist with a career in academia, international agricultural research and the World Bank where I directed the World Development Report 2008 on Agriculture. I then joined the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University where I worked on the twin issues of land use changes in the tropics and large-scale investments in farming. The surge in oil crops, notably soybeans and oil palm, was clearly the major driver of both phenomena as recognized by many environmentalists. However, the major supply and demand drivers of the global edible oil markets were poorly analyzed. With colleagues at Stanford University, Professors Rosamond Naylor and Walter Falcon, we felt there was a gap that we could fill. Stanford University has had a long history of undertaking commodity studies and in fact, carried out a series of detailed studies on fats and oils in the 1920s.Mongabay.com: What are the biggest factors behind the surge in tropical oil crop production?Derek Byerlee: A host of factors aligned on the demand and supply sides to produce a “perfect storm” for growth of tropical oil crops.First and foremost, demand expanded rapidly for both protein meal and vegetable oils. As consumers in emerging economies became richer, they greatly increased their consumption of livestock products and the associated demand for protein meal for feed, as well as for vegetable oils for cooking and processed foods.Second, the rising demand for vegetable oils was further fueled—both literally and figuratively—when the biodiesel industry took off. This industry, driven by policies mandating the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel in several countries, has accounted for about one-third of the increase in global vegetable oil demand since 2003.Third, on the supply side, cheap land in Brazil became accessible with the construction of new highways and ports, and new technologies allowed soybeans to grow well in the tropics. In Southeast Asia, even cheaper land became available for oil palm as governments made large concessions of forested and degraded land available to private companies. In addition, the era of market liberalization and privatization starting in the late 1980s brought a surge of private capital, often foreign, to develop new supply chains, especially during the commodity boom from 2007-14. Cheap credit, often subsidized, was also available to the oil crop sector through national development banks. Easy access to land and capital, along with the availability of productive technologies, made oil crops very profitable and promoted their expansion.Fourth, global trade liberalization and integration under WTO stimulated trade in edible oils that linked producers in a handful of exporting countries to distant consumers at a relatively low cost. The most dramatic changes occurred in China and India. China’s liberalization of soybean imports made it by far the world’s largest importer of soybeans (mostly supplied by Brazil), and India’s liberalization of vegetable oil imports made it the world’s largest importer of vegetable oils (largely supplied by Indonesia).Finally, the extraordinary growth of the two dominant oil crops, oil palm and soybeans, came from massive substitution of their products for traditional sources of vegetable oil. For example, palm oil replaced virtually all of the coconut oil used in food in Indonesia and soybean meal replaced waste materials and by-products in animal feed in China. Mongabay.com: What are your expectations in terms of demand for 2050? (e.g. including animal feed and biofuels)Derek Byerlee: We differ with many who predict continuation of the rapid growth of the past two decades (for example, a Mongabay article on soybeans on Feb 9). For a number of reasons, our analysis sees growth in demand for tropical oil crops sharply slowing to 2050 (by as much as two-thirds).First, growth in demand for biofuel feedstocks cannot maintain the rapid pace of the past decade. This tapering off will be most apparent in the EU, the major consumer of biodiesel today, especially as it approaches the regulated maximum of renewable transport fuels that can be provided from foodstuffs. Some tropical countries, notably Brazil and Indonesia, may compensate only partly for the EU slowdown, but in our view neither India, China (the two most populous countries) nor sub-Saharan Africa will become significant producers of biodiesel, given their high dependency on imported vegetable oils.Second, the use of vegetable oils for food will also grow more slowly than in the recent past – in Asia, population growth will be slower and the effects of rising incomes will diminish as consumers in middle-income countries have already reach high levels of vegetable oil consumption. Likewise, the use of protein meal for animal feed is subject to a similar slowdown as China’s meat consumption levels-off.Third, on the supply side, the transactions costs of assessing large tracts of land is increasing as environmental regulations tighten and current users gain more secure rights to their land. Our analysis also indicates that the area covered by oil crops does not have to expand greatly to meet future demand, which can be supplied largely through intensification of existing crop land through steady genetic gains in yields and closing yield gaps. Agriculture, Amazon Soy, Archive, Biodiesel, Biofuels, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Farming, Featured, Food, Forests, Interviews, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Soy Mongabay.com: And what sort of impact would you expect that to have on native ecosystems like tropical forests, woodlands, and savannas?Derek Byerlee: Obviously, the sharp slowing of demand and land requirements will reduce the pressure on native ecosystems. Better land and forest governance has already minimized the area deforested to produce soybeans and the major challenge now is to better manage expansion on the savannahs of Latin America and increasingly Africa, whose valuable ecosystem services have been underappreciated. In the case of oil palm, sufficient degraded land is available to accommodate area expansion, provided land governance and incentive systems can be developed to steer the expansion onto degraded lands and away from areas of natural vegetation with high carbon stocks and biodiversity values.Mongabay.com: Do you think mechanisms like the Amazon soy moratorium and zero deforestation commitments from oil palm growers will be effective in pushing expansion to less sensitive areas?Derek Byerlee: We are cautiously optimistic on these initiatives. The soy moratorium has already minimized the area planted on forests. More research is needed to understand secondary effects of replacing pastures with soybeans, given that cattle ranching is now the major driver of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The zero deforestation commitment by big traders of palm oil is a major breakthrough but challenging to implement given poor forest governance in frontier areas (e.g., in Kalimantan and Papua in Indonesia and Cameroon), and the complexity of palm oil supply chains. However, new technologies for supply chain management and real-time monitoring of deforestation improve the chances for success.Oil palm plantation cut into the steep forested slopes of a mountain in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Mongabay.com: There’s been a lot of talk about central and west Africa becoming a major area of expansion for industrial oil palm, yet to date commercial oil palm development in the region is lagging far behind the hype. What are your expectations for the region and will oil palm be challenged by issues indigenous crops often face in their native lands when they are grown as monocultures?Derek Byerlee: The fastest growth in food consumption of edible oils will be in Africa. West and Central Africa have gone from being the world’s major exporter in the 1960s to becoming a significant importer. The small-scale semi-artisanal sector that produces red palm oil for local diets is a major source of livelihoods. However, it is no longer a player in world markets and is falling behind in meeting the burgeoning demand for refined oil for processed foods for urban markets.   There is a long history since the early 1900s of promoting oil palm plantations in the region with very modest success. Recent experience has not been encouraging in countries such as Liberia due to weak land tenure security. We advocate a judicious combination of improvements in the local supply chains of smallholders and small-scale processors with injections of outside capital, technology, and market expertise through private investors. The current emphasis on investment in large plantations is unlikely to be sustainable, given the complexities of African land markets and land rights.Mongabay.com: Oil palm has increased smallholder livelihoods in many parts of the world. Are there opportunities for other oil crops like soy to act as a catalyst for smallholder incomes?Derek Byerlee: Yes, there is growing evidence of the role of oil palm – especially the two million or more smallholders – in reducing poverty in Indonesia. One of the little known success stories has been the expansion of soybeans in India becoming the world’s fourth largest in terms of area, entirely by small and very poor farmers. There are now local successes with soybeans in Southern Africa that could with appropriate support develop into major new income sources for the small farmers of the region.Soy fields next to a riparian zone in the Brazilian Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerMongabay.com: One of the big challenges in places for oil palm in places like Indonesia is smallholder productivity.  Do you see much progress in improving smallholder yields and getting better genetic material to rural communities?Derek Byerlee: Smallholder yields on average in Indonesia are about 85% of plantations but that includes a substantial outgrower segment associated with plantations. Improving yields of independent growers is the major challenge, starting with good genetic materials. We don’t see this as an insurmountable problem and there is much experience on how to do this from other tree crops that were formerly grown mostly on large plantations. The two leading tea exporters, Kenya and Sri Lanka, have largely converted from plantations to smallholders over the past 30 years and yield gaps are now small. Likewise, Thailand the second biggest rubber exporter, has achieved over 80% adoption of clonal rubber and the highest yields of any major producer, exclusively through smallholders. Well-run parastatals supported by a small levy on exports in Sri Lanka and Thailand and a smallholder-owned tea development company in Kenya have made these successes possible.Mongabay.com: Do you foresee any major substitutes on the horizon — like algae or fungi — that could curb or reverse tropical oil crop expansion?Derek Byerlee: We looked at this and decided that the production of edible oils from algae or other means is a long way in the future. However, second generation biofuels if successful could sharply curtail demand for vegetable oils.Endangered species like orangutans has lost vast areas of habitat due to conversion for oil palm plantations and soy fields. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerMongabay.com: How does climate change factor into potential expansion in coming decades?Derek Byerlee: We did not explicitly look at the effect of climate change on yields as it would have to be done in the context of the global markets for edible oils. The most likely scenario is that temperate countries with a lot of land such as Russia and Ukraine would capture a greater share of the market for edible oils relative to oil palm that would be negatively affected by and longer and hotter dry season.The Tropical Oil Crop Revolution: Food, Feed, Fuel, and Forests by Derek Byerlee, Walter P. Falcon, and Rosamond L. Naylor. Published: 07 November 2016.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Need a Trump break? Meet Obama’s fish

first_imgResearcher names new species of deep coral fish after the 44th President of the U.S.Scientists don’t know if the new species is threatened, but it is found in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.Discovery hints at how many species still await names. The eight year tenure of Barack Obama has come to a close, and as you reflect on his time in the White House you may think of his efforts to reduce carbon emissions, his commitment to healthcare reforms, or his nuclear agreement with Iran. But you may be missing one small part of his legacy – a 61.5 millimeter legacy, to be exact. A new species of fish, Tosanoides obama or colloquially, Obama’s fish, has been named for our former president to honor his dedication to marine conservation.Dr. Richard Pyle, a scientist with the Bishop Museum of Honolulu, first observed the fish during a diving excursion at Kure Atoll off the coast of Hawaii. The discovery site is located within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, a protected area expanded by Obama during his last days in office.This monument is the largest fully-protected conservation area in the U.S., amounting to 1,508,870 square kilometers (582,578 square miles). It was first established as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument in 2006 under the Bush Administration. The park received its Hawaiian name the following year.Holotype of Tosanoides obama (BPBM 41315), collected at a depth of 90 m off Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Photo credit: Richard L. Pyle.Tosanoides obama was discovered in a deep coral reef, also known as a mesophotic reef. These ecosystems are found 100 to 500 feet below the surface, and because they exist in such deep water, resient species must be able to survive with less sunlight. Globally, these ecosystems have been explored not only off the coast of Hawaii, but also in other tropical and subtropical areas such as the Mariana Islands and the Samoa Islands.According to Pyle, these ecosystems are a new frontier for marine exploration. With advances in diving technology, we can now dive deeper than ever before.On the day of the discovery, Pyle first mistook Obama’s fish for a common species, the fairy bass (Pseudanthias thompsoni).“Except there was something on its dorsal fin. My first thought was that it was a parasite clinging to the dorsal fin,” Pyle said. “As I got a closer look, I saw that it wasn’t a parasite at all, but rather a bright red spot with a blue ring. That’s when I suddenly realized it was a fish I didn’t recognize.”Dr. Sylvia Earle gives President Barack Obama a photograph of Tosanoides obama on Midway Atoll. Photo credit: Brian Skerry / National Geographic.Described in the journal ZooKeys, Obama’s fish is only one of three in its genus and the only species endemic to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The two other species, Tosanoides filamentosus and Tosanoides flavofasciatus, are also found within the northwestern regions of the tropical and subtropical Pacific. Obama’s fish is distinguished by slightly different characteristics, such as life color, smaller body size, and unbranched pectoral fin rays.Scientists have only sighted five individuals of Tosanoides obama to date, once by Pyle and again by Brain Greene, the director of the Association for Marine Exploration. Greene encountered Obama’s fish at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, also within Papahānaumokuākea.Pyle concludes that the species is probably abundant in even deeper places which scientists are currently unable to dive. Because so little is known about Tosanoides obama’s life history, habitat, and distribution, conservationists are not yet able to say if the species is threatened, nor can they determine what its biggest threats might be.The expansion of Papahānaumokuākea by Obama was a major victory for the protection of deep coral reefs.“In particular these deep habitats are vulnerable to deep-sea fishing and coral collecting through trawls and dredging, which would be devastating to this species,” Pyle said. “The expanded protection keeps shipping traffic and other possible sources of pollution away from the main populations for this and other species”.Within deep coral reefs lie boundless opportunities for the discovery of new and endemic species. But because these reefs are harder to access and more difficult for us to see, their conservation can be arguably more challenging than their shallow reef counterparts.Unfortunately, even protected areas cannot be shielded from global stressors such as climate change and ocean acidification. The public can, however, recognize that marine ecosystems are incredibly resilient and protect them from the threats we can more readily control.According to Pyle, the next step forward in marine conservation will be to create policies and international treaties to protect the high seas, those vast areas of the ocean that do not fall under the control of any single country. The high seas constitute 60 percent of our oceans and remain relatively unprotected.As for Tosanoides obama, this species is quite literally one small fish in a greater ocean of biodiversity. In addition to its tribute to the 44th President of the United States, it symbolizes the wealth of unidentified species we have yet to discover and understand.“Biodiversity is unambiguously the most valuable asset of planet Earth for the future of Humanity,” said Pyle. “It’s like a giant library of information refined over nearly four billion years of evolution…Currently we’re like kindergartners running through the biological equivalent of the Library of Congress. We are just barely beginning to understand the potential value of the information that surrounds us.”Sources:Deep Coral Reefs. (n.d.). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved February 21, 2017, from https://www.pifsc.noaa.gov/cred/deep_coral_reefs.phpPapahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (2017). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved February 21, 2017, from http://www.papahanaumokuakea.gov/new-about/Pyle RL, Greene RD, Kosaki RK (2016) Tosanoides obama, a new basslet (Perciformes, Percoidei, Serranidae) from deep coral reefs in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. ZooKeys641: 165-181. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.641.11500NOTE: An earlier draft of this article was mistakenly published previously. It has been updated to the correct version. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Fish, Interns, New Species, Oceans, Wildlife last_img read more

Rare beaked whale filmed underwater for the first time

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta First underwater video of True’s beaked whales. Video by Roland Edler. True’s beaked whale is difficult to spot at sea, and remains a poorly studied species.By analyzing stranding data and live sightings of the whale, researchers confirm that the Azores and Canary Islands may actually be a hotspot for studying the natural behavior of the species.For the data-scarce whale species, live sightings and video recordings are highly valuable because they add to information that helps identify a species accurately.This in turn can help scientists monitor the status of their populations and protect them. True’s beaked whales are notoriously elusive.Like other beaked whales, they dive deep into oceans for prolonged periods of time, and surface only for short breathing intervals, making them very difficult to study. So far, only a handful of live sightings of this whale species have been recorded.But now, an international team of scientists has captured the first ever underwater video of wild True’s beaked whales swimming around Pico Island in the Portuguese Azores in northeast Atlantic Ocean. They have also photographed a calf of the species for the first time. The team reported their findings in the journal PeerJ. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The True’s beaked whale belongs to a family of cetaceans called Ziphiidae that includes 22 species of beaked whales. Despite being large-sized, these whales are extremely difficult to observe and remain one of the least understood mammals in the world. This is because they spend most of their lives underwater, sometimes feeding at depths of nearly two miles for hours. These whales are also hard to spot because they are not usually attracted to boats and do not perform aerial acrobatics like dolphins. In fact, they are so poorly studied that scientists have discovered three new species of beaked whales in just the last two decades.Moreover, the True’s beaked whale is similar in appearance to the other beaked whales in its genus Mesoplodon — Blainville’s, Sowerby’s, and Gervais’ beaked whales — and is very difficult to distinguish at sea. Unsurprisingly, scientists are still figuring out the whale’s distribution in the North Atlantic Ocean and in the Southern Hemisphere.This is the first image, to the author’s knowledge, of a young calf of True’s beaked whales. Photo by Ida Eriksson.Now, by analyzing stranding data and live sightings of the True’s beaked whale recorded by scientists, whale watch companies and educational teams in Azores and Canary Islands, researchers confirm that the Azores and Canary Islands may actually be a hotspot for studying the natural behavior of the species.“The relative abundance of live sightings of True’s beaked whales in deep coastal waters off the Azores, and to some extent off the Canary Islands, suggests that these archipelagos could be ideal areas to research True’s beaked whales in the wild,” the authors write in the paper. “This is relevant because the identification of hot-spots where some species of beaked whales are found with reliability has provided most of our current knowledge about the natural behaviour of ziphiids.”The team also highlighted several morphological features of the True’s beaked whale, including a new coloration pattern, which may help in identifying the species at sea.For the data-scarce whale species, live sightings and video recordings are highly valuable, researchers say, because they add to the information that helps identify a species accurately. This in turn can help scientists monitor the status of their populations and protect them.First underwater images of three adult or subadult True’s beaked whales. Photo by Roland Edler.True’s beaked whales sometimes breach and this gives observers a better opportunity to identify the species. Here, the two little white dots in the front of the beak show that this animal is a male True ́s beaked whale. Photo by Dylan Walker.Citation:Aguilar de Soto N, Martín V, Silva M, Edler R, Reyes C, Carrillo M, Schiavi A, Morales T, García-Ovide B, Sanchez-Mora A, Garcia-Tavero N, Steiner L, Scheer M, Gockel R, Walker D, Villa E, Szlama P, Eriksson IK, Tejedor M, Perez-Gil M, Quaresma J, Bachara W, Carroll E. (2017) True’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) in Macaronesia. PeerJ 5:e3059 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3059FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Cetaceans, Conservation, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Oceans, Research, Video, Videos, Whales, Wildlife last_img read more

Urban heat island effect could more than double climate costs for cities

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki The higher climate toll that cities will pay is due to the urban heat island effect, which is caused by the replacement of vegetation and bodies of water by concrete, asphalt, and other materials that trap more heat. The effect is only further exacerbated by the abundance of things like cars and air conditioners in urban areas, which emit more heat and global warming pollution.An international team of researchers with the UK’s University of Sussex, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and Vrije University Amsterdam looked at 1,692 cities around the world in order to determine just how much the urban heat island effect could compound the losses already expected to result from global warming.The researchers found that, on average, economic losses from higher temperatures could be 2.6 times higher in cities than they would be if heat island effects weren’t factored into the equation. Economists generally expect climate change to cost a lot of money and impact nearly every sector of the economy. And now, according to new research published in the journal Nature Climate Change last month, it appears cities could be hit even harder if they don’t take efforts to mitigate the impacts of rising global temperatures.The higher climate toll that cities will pay is due to the urban heat island effect, which is caused by the replacement of vegetation and bodies of water by concrete, asphalt, and other materials that trap more heat. The effect is only further exacerbated by the abundance of things like cars and air conditioners in urban areas, which emit more heat and global warming pollution.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says that, while there are some positive impacts of the urban heat island effect, such as a longer growing season, most are decidedly negative, such as increased energy consumption, higher rates of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, poorer water quality, and associated risks to human health.All of these impacts can have an obvious effect on a large urban area’s economy, even while the heat island effect makes heat waves worse, leading to lower worker productivity. So it’s perhaps no surprise that, according to the authors of the Nature Climate Change study, “The impacts of [global climate change] in cities are likely to be amplified by those of the [urban heat island effect].”An international team of researchers with the UK’s University of Sussex, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and Vrije University Amsterdam looked at 1,692 cities around the world in order to determine just how much the urban heat island effect could compound the losses already expected to result from global warming.First, they quantified just how much the urban heat island effect will magnify increasing average temperatures in cities due to global warming. “For the most populated cities (that is, the top 5%), the effects of [urban heat islands] add 1.72°C, 2.08°C and 2.35°C to the temperature increase due to [global climate change] in 2015, 2050 and 2100, respectively,” the researchers note in the report. “These estimates are 0.70°C, 0.84°C and 0.93°C for the median cities. About 20% of these cities could experience a total warming higher than 4°C in 2050 and about 25% could warm more than 7°C by the end of this century.”The researchers found that, on average, economic losses from higher temperatures could be 2.6 times higher in cities than they would be if heat island effects weren’t factored into the equation.Some cities, of course, will fare worse than others. The hardest hit, per the report, could lose as much as 10.9 percent of their gross domestic product (GDP) by 2100 due to the combined effects of climate change and the heat island effect, far higher than the global average of 5.6 percent.But even under the lowest emissions scenarios, the costs to cities could be as much as 30 percent higher than they would be without heat island effects. What this shows, according to Richard S.J. Tol, a professor of Economics at the University of Sussex, is that “Any hard-won victories over climate change on a global scale could be wiped out by the effects of uncontrolled urban heat islands.”If the study contains any good news, it’s that local economic impacts can be tempered by adaptation policies at the city level. Cool pavements, green roofs, and expanding vegetation in cities are among the tactics for mitigating warming that the researchers examined for the study.The most cost-effective measure, according to their models, is moderate-scale installation of cool pavements and roofs, which reflect more sunlight and thus absorb less heat. Cities can reduce air temperatures by about 0.8 degrees by changing 20 percent of their roofs and half of their pavement to “cool” materials, thus saving up to 12 times as much money as it would cost to install and maintain those cool roofs and paved areas.The benefits of these local efforts are amplified when done in concert with effective global efforts to mitigate global warming, Tol adds. “It is clear that we have until now underestimated the dramatic impact that local policies could make in reducing urban warming,” he said in a statement.“However, this doesn’t have to be an either/or scenario. In fact, the largest benefits for reducing the impacts of climate change are attained when both global and local measures are implemented together. And even when global efforts fail, we show that local policies can still have a positive impact, making them at least a useful insurance for bad climate outcomes on the international stage.”Green roof of City Hall in Chicago, Illinois. Installing green roofs is one of the adaptation measures that cities can use to lower local temperatures and hence the economic impacts of climate change. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONEstrada, F., Botzen, W. W., & Tol, R. S. (2017). A global economic assessment of city policies to reduce climate change impacts. Nature Climate Change. doi:10.1038/nclimate3301Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Air Pollution, Cities, Climate Change, Climate Change Policy, Environment, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Research, Urban Planning, Urbanization last_img read more

Audio: Global megadam activism and the sounds of nature in Taiwan

first_imgActivists from around the world attended the conference to strategize around stopping what they see as destructive hydropower projects. As Bardeen relates in her commentary, many attendees at the conference have faced harassment, intimidation, and worse for their opposition to dam projects, but they’re still standing strong in defense of free-flowing rivers.We also speak with Yannick Dauby, a French sound artist based in Taiwan. Since 2002, Dauby has been crafting sound art out of field recordings made throughout the small country of Taiwan and posting them on his website, Kalerne.net.In this Field Notes segment, Dauby plays a recording of his favorite singer, a frog named Rhacophorus moltrechti; the sounds of the marine life of the corals of Penghu, which he is documenting together with biologists; the calls bats use to echolocate (slowed down 16 times so they can be heard by human ears!); and more!All that plus the top news on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast! On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we talk to Sarah Bardeen, the communications director for Berkeley, California-based NGO International Rivers. Bardeen wrote a commentary for Mongabay earlier this year after attending an international gathering of river defenders in Tbilisi, Georgia, one of many countries around the world currently in the grip of a hydroelectric dam-building boom, and we were interested in hearing about what came out of that meeting.Activists from around the world attended the conference to strategize around stopping what they see as destructive hydropower projects. As Bardeen relates in her commentary, many attendees at the conference have faced harassment, intimidation, and worse for their opposition to dam projects, but they’re still standing strong in defense of free-flowing rivers.In fact, even as we were recording the interview with Bardeen, 200 indigenous Munduruku people were occupying the São Manoel hydroelectric dam building site in response to the destruction of their sacred sites by previous dam projects along the Teles Pires and Tapajós rivers in the Brazilian Amazon.We also speak with Yannick Dauby, a French sound artist based in Taiwan. Since 2002, Dauby has been crafting sound art out of field recordings made throughout the small country of Taiwan and posting them on his website, Kalerne.net. In this Field Notes segment, Dauby plays a recording of his favorite singer, a frog named Rhacophorus moltrechti; the sounds of the marine life of the corals of Penghu, which he is documenting together with biologists; the calls bats use to echolocate (slowed down 16 times so they can be heard by human ears!); and more! Dauby also tells us about how he uses his sound art as an educator to inspire environmental conservation.Here’s this episode’s top news:Study: Biodiversity poorly protected by conservation areas worldwide2016 was even deadlier for environmental and indigenous activists than 2015Halfway through the year, 2017 is on pace to be the second warmest on recordSeafood giant Thai Union commits to clean up supply chains following pressure campaignOngoing mass extinction causing ‘biological annihilation,’ new study saysColombia expands indigenous reserves near key deforestation hotspotIf you’d like to request email alerts when we publish new stories here on Mongabay.com on specific topics that you care about most, from forests and oceans to indigenous people’s rights and more, visit alerts.mongabay.com and sign up!Mongabay is a nonprofit and relies on the support of its readers, so if you value what you learn at the site and on this podcast, please visit mongabay.org/donate to help make it all possible.You can subscribe to our podcast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or RSS.A Teles Pires River dam construction site. The four dams located there are part of the Tapajós Complex, a series of more than 40 dams to be constructed in the Tapajós Basin as part of the Tapajós Complex, an industrial waterway for moving soy to the Atlantic Coast. Photo courtesy of International Rivers.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Acoustic, Activism, Amazon, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate Change, Conservation, Dams, Deforestation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Extinction, Fishing, Forests, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Fishing, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Mekong Dams, Overfishing, Podcast, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Rivers, Sixth Mass Extinction, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

What happens after a mining rush? Photographs from Madagascar

first_imgPrecious and semi-precious stone mines, legal or not, are born, die, and spring back to life all over Madagascar.Much of the gem mining in Madagascar is unofficial and therefore unregulated, so the immediate impacts are high, both envirnmentally and socially. But people seldom examine the long-lasting effects.Toward the end of 2016, photoreporter Arnaud De Grave spent several months in the country’s eastern Alaotra-Mangoro region, in an area experiencing a mining recession.His photos show the toll of mining on people’s lives and the landscape. ALAOTRA-MANGORO, Madagascar — Mines, legal or not, are born, die, and spring back to life all over Madagascar. It has been this way since the 1990s.Some become famous, such as the recent one near Didy, a small town in the country’s eastern Alaotra-Mangoro region. In November 2016 a London-based gemologist published a video showing a sapphire rush and the resulting environmental downfall of a large area inside Didy’s Ankeniheny-Zahamena Corridor protected area. Bushmeat hunting, forest degradation, and the impact of more than 45,000 people coming to mine there for a few weeks took a heavy toll on the landscape and wildlife. A similar rush had happened in the area in 2012.Much of the gem mining in Madagascar is unofficial and therefore unregulated, so the impacts are high, both environmentally and socially. Even when the mining sites are remote, often hours or even days of walking from a neighboring town, during the peaks of activity everyone lives and breathes alongside the mine. It can disrupt the local economy: the price of chicken can triple locally, as it is easy to bring to the mine site and keep fresh if alive. Crime, prostitution (miners are mostly men), and child labor rise.Near the town of Andilamena, about 110 kilometers (68 miles) north of Alaotra-Mangoro’s capital city of Ambatondrazaka, this pattern has unfolded many times. The rush, the money, the mass migration. Then the mine dies. Or another one with better promises of fast riches is born somewhere else. And it all falls down. Then, some years later, the cycle starts again.Madagascar’s Alaotro-Mangoro region. Map courtesy of Google Maps.I was curious: what happens after the fall? For the ones who stay? The environmental and social disaster that unfolds while a mine is active has been well documented all over the country. But people seldom examine the long-lasting effects.I spent several months in the Alaotra-Mangoro region toward the end of 2016 as part of a three-year-long ethnography-inspired photography project that I undertook for the Swiss-led scientific endeavor AlaReLa (which stands for Alaotra Resilience Landscape). The area I visited is situated some 200 kilometers (124 miles) northeast of Antananarivo, Madagascar’s capital, and is considered the country’s rice granary. It is also highly biodiverse. A notable resident is the critically endangered Alaotran gentle lemur (Hapalemur alaotrensis), which is endemic to the vicinity of Lake Alaotra. The forest east of the lake is largely included in Zahamena National Park, which is part of the Ankeniheny-Zahamena Corridor, a strictly protected area — on paper, anyway. Several mining sites are, or have been, in operation in the corridor, most recently the one in Didy late last year.During my travels I visited the sleepy mining town of Andilamena, a nearly abandoned gem mine, and an active quartz mine, as well as villages and byways in between. I investigated the options for local people now that gem mining in the immediate area was in recession. Some residents worked in legal semiprecious stone quarries. Some worked in the remaining local businesses associated with farming and herding. And some had gone to join an active mine, such as the one about 130 kilometers (81 miles) away in Didy. I interviewed and photographed around three-dozen people: miners, former miners, people who improved their livelihoods, and people who lost everything.last_img read more

Around Whittier

first_imgHealth plan still offered to seniors CERRITOS – Those eligible seniors who missed the March 31 Medicare deadline may still enroll for coverage by contacting CareMore Health Plan. Those with chronic medical conditions may still enroll in CareMore Reliance special needs plan anytime through 2007. For more information or to schedule an interview, call (949) 636-4242. Awards to honor AIDS awareness WHITTIER – The Whittier Rio Hondo AIDS Project invites the community to join them for an evening of friendship, fine dining and honoring those who have advanced the group’s service to people with HIV/AIDS and support of the Christopher Wahl Youth Center. The Sixth Annual “Celebration of Life Awards” will take place Thursday, June 7 at 6:30 p.m. at the Friendly Hills Country Club, located at 8500 S. Villaverde Dr. Those to be honored include Macy’s, Reverend Bruce Bergthold of Hillcrest Congregational Church and Richard Espinosa, health deputy of Los Angeles County 4th District. A reception and silent auction will take place before the dinner and awards. Cocktail attire is requested. For more information, call (562) 698-3850. Avocado event set for this Saturday LA HABRA HEIGHTS – The La Habra Heights Park and Recreation Committee will host the La Habra Heights Avocado Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at The Park, 1885 N. Hacienda Rd. The festival is a small, noncommercial event that will include avocado-related booths and merchandise, educational booths and animals such as llamas, bees and opossums. For more information, call Carol Engelheardt at (909) 396-3450 or (562) 697-1258. Elks BBQ benefits cancer charities NORWALK – The Norwalk Elks Lodge will hold a BBQ fundraiser dinner for breast cancer awareness from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 26, 13418 Clarkdale Ave. The cost of dinner is $5 a plate with all proceeds going to support activities relating to breast cancer awareness. For more information, call Jennifer Ludwick at (714) 713-1692. – From staff reports160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – In honor of May being Foster Parent Month, Children’s Bureau is hosting an information meeting for foster and adoptive parents Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Whitwood Library, located at 10537 Santa Gertrudes. Children’s Bureau, which is a 104-year-old non-profit organization, provides training, intensive services, support groups and resources for foster and adoptive parents. Prospective caregivers are encouraged to attend the meeting. For more information, call (800) 730-3933, Ext. 0. last_img read more

Klopp on Liverpool starlet Gomez – ‘Wonderful young boy: tall, muscles in the right positions’

first_imgJurgen Klopp has told Liverpool starlet Joe Gomez he will do everything he can to help the defender return from his ill-timed injury as soon as possible.The new Reds manager has confirmed news that the 18-year-old defender sustained an anterior cruciate ligament injury on England Under-21 duty, which is likely to rule him out for the rest of the seasonHowever, Klopp has told the youngster he will give him all the time he needs to fight his way back to fitness.“The information about young Joe Gomez is not the best. He came back here and I met him for the first time,” he said.“What a wonderful young boy: tall, muscles in the right positions, but he has an injured knee – an ACL.“We have to make a further diagnosis and we will see when he gets operated on but from this point on he can count the days until he comes back.“It was not the best day in his life but he is a young guy and I am pretty good at waiting for players, young players especially.“This is his home and we will do everything to help him come back as soon as possible.”Klopp offered more optimistic news on striker Christian Benteke [hamstring] and Roberto Firmino [back], two players who are expected to play a major part in his plans to implement a new way of working at the club having taken over from Brendan Rodgers.“Benteke and Firmino are on their way back too. They are back on the pitch but not team training,” he added in his pre-match press conference ahead of his first game as Liverpool boss at Tottenham on Saturday.“I do not know exactly when they come back but next week [it will be with team training] and then we can see how fit they are.“For sure not Saturday [they will be fit] and I don’t think Thursday but maybe next Sunday.” Liverpool defender Joe Gomez 1last_img read more

JUDGE SENDS DAD ON ANGER MANAGEMENT COURSE IN HOPE HE CAN WALK DAUGHTER DOWN AISLE ONE DAY

first_imgA father has been ordered to go on an anger management course in the hope that he can one day walk his daughter down the aisle.Letterkenny Court.The man appeared at a special sitting of Letterkenny District Court yesterday charged with assaulting his young daughter and also breaking a safety order. The court heard how the man, who cannot be named, had visited his estranged wife and his children at their home on Mother’s Day, March 10th, 2013.The father had spoken to his daughter about getting her an arena for her horses and he said he was still trying to get the matter sorted.The girl left the room but claims she was followed into another room by her father.Appearing by videolink, the girl claimed her father then pushed his finger into her throat and gritted his teeth telling her “You listen to me.”The young girl said she was terrified and ran upstairs to tell her mother who came down and asked her husband to leave the house.“He pushed his finger in. I was terrified – really scared. I thought he would hurt me really bad. It was sore. He said ‘would you listen to me’. He bared his bottom teeth.“It lasted 30 seconds and he just let go and stood up and I just got up and went upstairs to mum. I was scared and I just wanted to get to mammy as quick as possible,” said the young girl in evidence.However, in denying both charges, the man said he never touched his daughter and said he was sad to see her having to go through such an ordeal in court.The man, who was represented by solicitor Patsy Gallagher, said he had put his arm around his daughter to try and convince her that he would get an arena for her horses at some stage.However, he said she jumped up and left the room.He said he would never hurt his children whom he now only saw for three hours each week as he was going through a separation with his wife.The man’s wife said their daughter was terrified after the incident and although she had a red mark on her throat, had not had to receive medical attention.After considering the case, Judge Alan Mitchell, said he was dismissing the charge that the man breached the safety order.However he said he believed the girl’s version of events and was satisfied that an assault had taken place.However he said he did not think that a conviction against the man would be appropriate if he wanted to one day walk his daughter down the aisle.He adjourned the case for six months and ordered the man to undergo an anger management course and also ordered a probation report.Judge Mitchell added that if no other matters by the father against his daughter arose and that if he attended the anger management course, he would strike out the conviction.He then addressed both the mother and father saying “If you are separating I would ask you to park the children aside.”He adjourned the case again for mention until April 20th.JUDGE SENDS DAD ON ANGER MANAGEMENT COURSE IN HOPE HE CAN WALK DAUGHTER DOWN AISLE ONE DAY was last modified: November 21st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultcourtdaughterdonegalJudge Alan Mitchellletterkennylast_img read more