World’s second breeding population of Indochinese tigers discovered in Thailand’s forests

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman The world’s second known breeding population of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti) confirmed in Eastern Thailand’s Dong-Phayayen Khao Yai Forest Complex – a UNESCO World Heritage site.Remarkable discovery now makes Thailand home to two breeding populations of this tiger subspecies, a significant step toward ensuring their long-term survival in the wild.Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) and conservation groups Freeland and Panthera have conducted a scientific survey on the tiger population using the ‘photographic capture-recapture’ method, indicating a density of 0.63 tigers per 100 square kilometers.While conservationists welcome these exciting new findings, they warn of the continued decline of tigers elsewhere in Thailand and across their global range. Conservationists in Thailand and the country’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) have released scientific findings today that confirm the existence of the world’s second breeding population of Indochinese tigers, and provided the first photographic evidence of tiger cubs in Thailand’s Eastern Forest Complex.A camera trap survey conducted using the “photographic capture-recapture” method in the country’s eastern Dong Phayayen – Khao Yai Forest Complex (DPKY-FC) during 2016 has revealed a density of 0.63 tigers per 100 square kilometers (~1.63 tigers per 100 square miles ), confirmed a joint statement released today by the DNP, counter-trafficking organization Freeland and global wild cat conservation organization Panthera.While the scientific data suggests an exceptionally low tiger density — on par with some of the most threatened tiger habitats in the world — the findings, “demonstrate the species’ remarkable resilience given wildlife poaching and illegal rosewood logging present in the Complex,” the statement said.Two tiger cubs investigate a rock along a forest trail as their mother walks past. Younger cubs accompany their mother, learning about the forest in which they live through sight and scent. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.“The extraordinary rebound of eastern Thailand’s tigers is nothing short of miraculous,” said John Goodrich, one of the world’s leading tiger experts and Senior Tiger Program Director at Panthera. The new photographic evidence from the DPKY-FC of successful breeding of tigers is the first to surface in over fifteen years, and is a rare conservation win on the way to ensuring the magnificent cat’s long-term survival in the wild. Previously, Thailand was thought to house only one remaining viable breeding population of wild Indochinese tigers, in Huai Kha Khaeng wildlife sanctuary to the west of the country, which was reported to have 35 – 58 individuals as of February 2016. The discovery of this “new” population is the result of months monitoring with specifically-designed camera traps, and weeks of hard trekking through the forest by rangers and conservationists throughout 2016.“The stepping up of anti-poaching patrols and law enforcement efforts in this area have played a pivotal role in conserving the tiger population by ensuring a safe environment for them to breed,” the Director of the National Parks Division of the DNP Songtam Suksawang said in the statement. “However, we must remain vigilant and continue these efforts, because well-armed poachers still pose a major threat.”A trio of tigers, a mother and her two cubs, inspect a PantheraCam. This camera was one of over 156 camera traps placed by Thailand’s Department of National Parks (DNP), Freeland, and Panthera to survey a critically important population in Eastern Thailand in 2016. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2005, the DPKY-FC is one of mainland Southeast Asia’s last contiguous tracts of forest providing adequate habitat for tigers. Thailand’s wild tiger populations have been driven to the brink of extinction chiefly due to habitat loss, rampant poaching, and overhunting of their prey animals. Fewer than 200 wild tigers are thought to remain in Thailand.The remarkable evidence of breeding in the DPKY-FC bucks the trend of their continued decline elsewhere in the country, except in Huai Kha Khaeng wildlife sanctuary, where the present breeding population is largely due to a ramping up of protection efforts —including an intensive patrolling system — begun in 2005 by the Thai government. In other areas of suitable tiger habitat across Thailand, they have been gradually extirpated.A curious male tiger in Eastern Thailand spots a PantheraCam set by Thailand’s Department of National Parks (DNP), Freeland, and Panthera. These cameras have revealed important insight into this population of elusive big cats. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.[quote_colored name=”” icon_quote=”no”]If wild tigers are permitted to go extinct, “it would be the largest carnivore to do so since the American lion (Panthera leo atrox) died out at the end of the Pleistocene, approximately 10,000 years ago,” John Vaillant wrote in “The Tiger.” [/quote_colored]Worldwide, currently only an estimated 3,000-4,000 tigers remain in the wild, and according to IUCN they now inhabit less than 6 percent of their historical range, which once spanned from Turkey across Asia to Russia’s eastern coast. Listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, breeding populations of wild tigers were thought to exist in thirteen different countries as recently as 2006, but their continued sharp decline now sees them only in eight (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand and Russia). In 2011, the IUCN described the extent of the recent decline of the Indochinese subspecies as “serious” and “approaching the threshold of Critically Endangered.” If wild tigers are permitted to go extinct, “it would be the largest carnivore to do so since the American lion (Panthera leo atrox) died out at the end of the Pleistocene, approximately 10,000 years ago.” John Vaillant wrote in “The Tiger.”2016 proved a significant year for tigers when conservation group WWF and the Global Tiger Forum announced in April that the world’s tiger population had finally shown an increase after “several decades of constant decline.” The WWF study estimated that in April 2016 there were an estimated 3,890 wild tigers worldwide, up from 3,200 in 2010, when the 13 tiger range countries announced an ambitious commitment to double tiger numbers by 2022.  Several prominent tiger experts and scientists have however disputed the findings, claiming WWF’s report and its implications were “scientifically unconvincing.”In the same month, the WWF declared tigers in Cambodia “functionally extinct” stating, “there are no longer any breeding populations of tigers left in Cambodia,” largely due to intensive poaching and continued deforestation of Cambodia’s tropical dry forest ecosystems. A reintroduction action plan that will be implemented by the Cambodian government and WWF was also launched  last year.A mother tiger and her cub look curiously at a camera trap set along a forest trail in Eastern Thailand. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.In Thailand, conservationists are concerned that as illegal Siamese rosewood logging rages on across the entire DPKY-FC, the illegal loggers increasingly pose a deadly threat to the freshly discovered wild tiger population. It is crucial to bolster protection for Thailand’s wild tigers, Kraisak Choonhavan, Freeland’s chairman of the board said in the statement released today, adding, “As long as the illegal trade in tigers continues, they will need protection. Counter-wildlife trafficking starts at the source.”Thailand has ramped up protection for Siamese rosewood, in June 2015 the DNP formed an elite group of forest rangers called “Hasadin” specifically tasked with curbing the species’ rampant poaching and subsequent degradation of Thailand’s eastern forests. Across the DPKF-FC, officials are deploying new motion-sensor cameras that can send images in almost real-time to an email account, allowing them to keep track of multiple areas at once without having to deploy rangers to those locations.Two young tiger cubs cautiously explore a forest trail, intrigued by the flash of a camera set by Thailand’s Department of National Parks (DNP) and Freeland during tiger surveys. These young cubs, among the first ever photographed in Eastern Thailand, lend new hope that their population can be recovered. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland/Panthera.Keeping connectivity for tigers across Southeast AsiaContinued illegal logging, ongoing road expansion and encroachment within the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex saw the World Heritage Committee warn of a potential downgrading of the complex to the “World Heritage in Danger List” in 2015. The Committee is expected to make a decision at its 41st session in July this year. The expansion of Highway 304 – a road that cuts through the DPKY-FC, running between Khao Yai and Thap Lan National Parks, is one of those threats that could lead to a reduction in tiger numbers and occupancy, destroying part of the treasured tiger landscape and affecting their ability to move around within remaining complex area.Asia’s infrastructure development boom could lead to the creation of 11,000 new kilometers of roads and railways, causing “the unmitigated fragmentation and destruction” of tigers’ habitats and pushing them further to the brink of extinction in the wild, according to a report released by WWF last year. Maintaining strong connectivity between existing or potential habitats for the Indochinese tiger, and many other species that require large areas, such as the Asian elephant, is vital for those species’ long-term survival in an increasingly human-altered landscape.A female tiger emerges from the foliage of a forest in Eastern Thailand, spotting a camera trap set by Thailand’s Department of National Parks (DNP) and Freeland to survey and monitor these elusive big cats. Camera trap image courtesy of DNP/Freeland.The planned construction of a major highway linking the Dawei Special Economic Zone in southeast Myanmar to southwest Thailand will bisect remaining forest habitat, home to Indochinese tigers. The highway will cut through a critical corridor running north-south that links up two of the most significant forest conservation landscapes containing key protected areas in tropical Southeast Asia, Thailand’s Western Forest Complex (WEFCOM) and the Kaeng Krachan Forest Complex. A report released in April 2016 by WWF outlines the key wildlife crossing sites to be preserved or planned along the Dawei highway, using species modeling based on existing camera trap data and expert knowledge of species movement behavior. Kaeng Krachan National Park (within the Kaeng Krachan Forest Complex) —at the southern end of the critical forest corridor — is the largest national park in Thailand at 2,914 square kilometers (1,125 square miles), and is a large swathe of forest habitat with the potential to provide a reintroduction site for tigers.On today’s confirmation of the world’s second breeding population of Indochinese tigers, Goodrich said: “Thailand’s World Heritage Forest Complex is home to prime forested habitat that, with significant conservation resources, could support eight times as many tigers as it does now. With continued infiltration of rigorous anti-poaching protection, there is no doubt that this population can be fully recovered, burgeoning into a tiger stronghold and serving as a source of life and diversity for depleted tiger populations in Cambodia, Lao PDR and throughout the species’ range.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Megafauna, Poaching, Protected Areas, Tigers, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

A dangerous path: New highway could jeopardize tigers in India

first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar Conservationists have witnessed several unsettling deaths of tigers in Corbett National Park recently, one of India’s most important tiger parks.The state government of Uttarakhand, however, is moving forward on a plan to upgrade a road through the park into a full, public highway leading to alarm among tiger conservationists.Officials are currently discussing turning portions of the highway into a flyover, allowing wildlife to pass underneath, but even this would only mitigate the impact. On May 1, forestry officials in the Indian state of Uttarakhand discovered a tiger cub, abandoned and injured. They attempted to rescue the animal, but had arrived too late – it succumbed to dehydration the next day. Another young tiger, rescued in the region on the same day, died of starvation the following week.Ten tigers have now been found dead or dying in Uttarakhand since the beginning of 2017, and conservationists fear many more deaths could be on the horizon. The Uttarakhand government has recently proposed turning a small, partially paved road into a full-fledged national highway that would run straight through the heart of the state’s Corbett Tiger Reserve.India’s flagship tiger parkLocated in the northeast of India, at the foot of the Himalayas, Corbett Tiger Reserve spans over 1,300 square kilometers of dense forest and lush grassland fed by the sprawling Ramganga River reservoir. Corbett and the surrounding region are home to over 300 Bengal tigers, as well as a plethora of other wildlife including Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), leopards (Panthera pardus), sloth bears (Melursus ursinus), spotted deer (Axis axis), and a dizzying array of birdlife.Not only is Corbett the oldest national park in India, it was also the flagship park of the Indian government’s Project Tiger in the 1970s, launched to encourage sustainable management of the country’s tiger population. In many ways, Corbett is held up as the gold standard for what a tiger reserve should be, and indeed, its tiger population has been expanding in recent years.The reserve has “some of the world’s most productive tiger habitat,” said Dr. John Goodrich, Senior Tiger Program Director for Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization.“However,” Goodrich cautioned, “it is likely not large enough to withstand reduction, degradation, or fragmentation of habitat.”This year’s spate of deaths and their causes indicate that threats to habitats could already be occurring. In addition to dehydration and starvation, veterinarians have cited territorial infighting by tigers and alleged poisoning as likely causes of death.“Abnormal levels of infighting for territory, leading to early and increased mortality” and “increased conflict with human populations” are warning signs that a tiger population is lacking adequate space and resources, said Dr. Ashley Brooks, Habitats and Human Wildlife Conflict Lead for WWF Tigers Alive.The proposed highway would only exacerbate these issues, according to experts, and bring even more potential threats to Corbett’s important tiger population.Corbett Tiger Reserve is home to the densest population of Bengal tigers in the world, with one tiger every 6km2. Image credit: Soumyajit Nandyvia Wikimedia Commons.More tigers need more spaceIn 2010, the world’s 13 tiger-countries committed to doubling the global tiger population, increasing numbers from around 3,200 to over 6,000 by 2022. As of 2016, that commitment might be seeing some tentative success. According to a WWF report, the number of wild tigers has increased to 3,800 individuals. Yet some conservationists have called into question this figure based on what they contend is dubious data. Moreover, such numbers don’t tell the full story: tiger populations are still dropping in many parts of their range and numerous subspecies are on the knife’s edge of extinction.WWF recommends that to accommodate tigers’ needs, governments should manage tiger landscapes as a mosaic of different habitats linking smaller tiger populations, and incorporating mitigating “buffer zones.” Smaller, highly protected areas thus act as “source” populations while the surrounding areas absorb “sink” populations that spread out through the corridors.These connective corridors are a critical part of the equation. Tigers currently roam just seven percent of their historic range, and there is little research on how tigers might adapt to a more cramped living environment, according to Wildlife Institute of India’s Dr. Bivash Pandav. Tigers’ territories are naturally very large – their ranges can encompass up to 1,000 square kilometers. When a high-density tiger population cannot access corridors to spread out, it could begin to suffer from poor genetic variation and increased conflict with humans and other tigers.“The first thing to know about wild tigers is that these are large predators that need protected and connected areas to roam, a healthy prey population to hunt, and access to water,” explained Brooks from WWF.As of the last population estimate by India’s Project Tiger in 2014, Corbett contains the highest density of tigers on the planet. It has thus far acted as a crucial source population for what is known as the Terai Arc landscape, but according to WWF, it might now be suffering the ill effects of poor landscape connectivity. And roads have been known to turn otherwise robust source habitats into sinks.The proposed national highway route through Corbett would cut straight through the park, fragmenting rather than expanding the range of an already over-crowded tiger population. A report released last year by WWF called linear infrastructure such as roads, “one of the greatest future threats to tigers.”Additionally, one of the only studies conducted solely on the impact of road construction on tigers concluded, unambiguously that “in habitats managed for tigers, construction of new roads should be prohibited wherever possible.” Fragmentation from roads could trap the high number of tigers in Corbett into a space too small to support them, leading to starvation, infighting, and human-tiger conflict.“Corbett is increasingly getting hemmed in by ever-expanding highways and roads, mining of sand, boulders and gravel and tourism infrastructure,” said Prerna Singh Bindra, a wildlife conservationist and former member of India’s National Board for Wildlife. “Protecting the integrity of this landscape is a must for the survival of tigers in the long term.”Corbett Tiger Reserve is a mixture of open grassland and forest, providing a diverse habitat for tigers, elephants, and birdlife. Image credit: Public Domain by Creative Commons.Road rageExperts, environmentalists, and concerned citizens have been pushing back against the national highway plans. A Change.org petition begun by activist Ashish Garg has accumulated over 25,000 signatures.The Uttarakhand government’s announcement that the road was to be made into a highway “was simply outrageous,” Garg told Mongabay in an email. “More so when there are alternatives available to construct new roads or widen existing highways which will also reduce the travelling time by the same duration.”But the government contends that the highway – which will cut down the travel time between the cities of Kotdwar and Ramnagar by two hours – can be constructed in a way that does not harm the park’s wildlife.“The government is trying to find a solution to the Kandi road project issue by which the safety of wildlife is ensured while keeping the convenience of people in mind,” said the Uttarakhand Forest Minister in a statement in The Hindu.However, wildlife experts like Avinash Basker, head of the Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI) Legal Programme, do not think this is possible.“Once the road is in use there will be wildlife deaths due to collisions, vehicular pollution and disturbance, easy access to outsiders, and the road will act as a barrier for the movement of wildlife.”This is not the first time the specter of a highway has hung over the reserve: road construction through the park was halted in 2001 after an elephant poaching incident drew concerns about creating an even easier access point for poachers. Conservationists say such concerns remain just as valid today. Panthera’s Goodrich cited poaching as a “critical threat” to the tigers in the Terai Arc landscape.In 2013, after considering these arguments against roadways, a committee from the Ministry of Environment and Forests formally recommended a ban on all new roads and the expansion of existing roads through protected areas in India. While not legally binding, this guideline was meant to dissuade any such future road construction and strengthen any case made against it.“Simply put,” said Bindra, who was part of the committee at the time, “roads spell the end of wilderness.”The ways forward?The Supreme Court has pushed back against the Uttarakhand government’s plans slightly, ruling against the use of public transport on the section of the road through the park and requesting plans for an alternative alignment. However, construction plans appear to be pushing ahead.Currently, the proposed mitigating solution is building flyover sections of highway that would allow wildlife to pass underneath the road. Raised highways can prove expensive, however, and those proposed in theory are often not translated into practice. If the reserve is to continue to be a shining example of tiger conservation, even properly managed mitigating measures will never be as effective as simply avoiding fragmentation of the landscape in the first place.“Mitigation measures by definition do not prevent damage, they only mitigate it,” said Basker of WPSI. “The way to avoid damage to local wildlife is to avoid building a road through the tiger reserve.” Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Habitat, Infrastructure, Interns, National Parks, Protected Areas, Tigers, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Visualizing the impacts of human disturbance on tropical forest biodiversity

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Efforts to protect biodiversity often focus on keeping forests and the habitat they represent from being cut down. But research published in the journal Nature last year suggests that forest degradation resulting from human activities is perhaps just as urgent a threat to biodiversity as deforestation.According to the study, man-made disturbances in Pará’s tropical forests have resulted in levels of biodiversity loss equivalent to clearing 92,000 to 139,000 square kilometers (around 35,500 to 53,700 square miles) of pristine forest.If that kind of raw data is hard to wrap your brain around, that’s where Silent Forest comes in. Thiago Medaglia described it as “a journalistic data visualization project” in an email to Mongabay. Efforts to protect wildlife often focus on keeping forests and the habitat they represent from being cut down. But research published in the journal Nature last year suggested that forest degradation resulting from human activities is perhaps just as urgent a threat to biodiversity as deforestation.In order to bring more attention to the findings of that Nature paper — and to elevate general awareness of the fact that addressing forest degradation is as important to wildlife conservation efforts as halting deforestation — a group of researchers and journalists got together and launched Silent Forest (Floresta Silenciosa in Portuguese), a web-based data visualization platform, last month.The Nature study looked at the impacts of human activities, including selective logging, road-building, hunting, and forest fires (which are becoming more frequent and more severe thanks to human-induced climate change), on plants, birds, and dung beetles in the state of Pará, which contains roughly 25 percent of the Brazilian Amazon. These man-made disturbances in Pará’s tropical forests have resulted in levels of biodiversity loss equivalent to clearing 92,000 to 139,000 square kilometers (around 35,500 to 53,700 square miles) of pristine forest, the researchers behind the study found.If that kind of raw data is hard to wrap your brain around, that’s where Silent Forest comes in. Thiago Medaglia described it as “a journalistic data visualization project” in an email to Mongabay. He serves as editorial coordinator of the platform, and is also founder of Ambiental Media, which partnered with the Sustainable Amazon Network and InfoAmazonia to create the Silent Forest site.“A multidisciplinary team was formed with the purpose to translate the scientific data in a faithful way, but communicated through digital tools that favor interaction with a wider audience,” Medaglia explained.An Amazonian timber yard. Photo by Jos Barlow.A map of Pará on the Silent Forest platform, for instance, lets users toggle between different views of the state showing the chief wood-gathering hubs in the forests, major roads, and areas that have been impacted by forest fires, logging, and other types of degradation.Toby Gardner, a scientist with the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and the Sustainable Amazon Network (RAS) who was also a co-author of the Nature study, told Mongabay that the name “Silent Forest” was chosen to emphasize the fact that degraded forests sound much different from intact forests. “They are quieter,” he said, “because they are biologically impoverished. This is a very powerful message to convey — degraded forests are not the same.”Gardner and the other co-authors of the Nature study developed what they call the Conservation Value Deficit index, which is intended to capture the combined effects of various disturbance types, from hunting and logging to fires and fragmentation. The impacts of each of these disturbances are highly interdependent, Gardner said.“As such, the impact of different disturbances cannot be studied in isolation,” he added. “The index offers us the first chance to look at the combined effect, and therefore compare the combined, total effect to the effect of deforestation.”Smoke billows from Amazonian wildfires in Pará state. Photo by Adam Ronan.Another map on Silent Forest shows the state of Pará divided into five different regions that are separated by rivers and harbor their own unique fauna and flora — what are known as “areas of endemism.” According to the map, the biodiversity losses caused by forest disturbance, as measured using the Conservation Value Deficit index, are greater than those caused by deforestation in three of the five areas. (Gardner is quick to point out that such comparisons can only be made at large scales: “Obviously impact of deforestation at local scale is much greater,” he said.)Silent Forest has also added a special interactive feature detailing how birds have been impacted by forest degradation in Pará. The authors of the Nature study note that Pará is home to more than 10 percent of the world’s bird species, many of which are endemic — and that some of these birds are suffering the most from human activities, as they cannot survive in forests with high levels of disturbance.Alexander Lees, an ornithologist at Manchester Metropolitan University (UK) who co-authored the Nature paper, came up with a categorization system for the birds, labeling them as “degradation tolerant,” “susceptible to degradation,” or “favored by degradation.” Silent Forest includes an interactive chart that conveys these findings and also includes illustrations of the bird species of Pará, data on each species’ occurrence, and even audio of the birds’ songs.There are no other short-term updates planned for the platform at this time, but Gardner says not to rule the possibility out: “We definitely want to keep this platform alive and use it as a powerful means of communicating and educating about the importance of forest degradation into the future.”The Slaty-capped Shrike-vireo (Vireolanius leucotis) is, like many bird species, negatively affected by forest disturbance. Photo by Alexander Lees.CITATIONBarlow, J., Lennox, G. D., Ferreira, J., Berenguer, E., Lees, A. C., Mac Nally, R., … & Parry, L. (2016). Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation. Nature, 535(7610), 144-147. doi:10.1038/nature18326Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Birds, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Deforestation, Environment, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Research, Roads, Selective Logging, Technology And Conservation, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In search of the fireface: The precarious, scandalous lives of the slow lorises of Java

first_imgCute and fuzzy but also vicious and venomous, Javan slow lorises have been driven to the brink of extinction by habitat destruction and the illegal pet trade.The Little Fireface Project in West Java is the first long-term research project focusing on the critically endangered primate.In addition to making strides toward understanding how to care for and reintroduce lorises to the wild, the project has revealed new details about the species’ complex, and often reality-show-worthy social behavior. WEST JAVA, Indonesia — Once we leave the village of Cipaganti in West Java, we turn our headlamps on, casting beams into the rapidly descending darkness. We take a path up a mountain slope past fields of tea, coffee and chayote squash. Large trees, where the forest once stood, border the fields. Primatologist Hélène Birot and three Indonesian trackers cast their beams into them from time to time, looking for Javan slow lorises (Nycticebus javanicus).I’m shadowing a team from the Little Fireface Project (LFP), a research and conservation organization devoted to these furry arboreal goblins. Slow lorises are some of the world’s most bizarre primates — big-eyed, venomous, often moving like the Tin Man — and some of the least studied.As we get deeper in, the trackers take out a radio antenna to get the location of the collared male we’re trying to find: Toyib, whose home range just happens to be the farthest from the village.“We know where they are all the time,” Birot, the LFP’s research coordinator, told me earlier in the day. “If you don’t have [collars] it’s very hard to find them. Especially because they are very quiet.”Soon we’re crossing into fields, heads bowed so as not to bump into the hard squash, and then beyond the fields altogether and — why not? — up the mountain. I find myself crawling vertically through an area I’m warned is home to lots and lots of wasps.Conservation scientists are crazy, I think, for the thousandth time in my career. Bonkers.They track Toyib into a stand of bamboo. Only he’s not alone. He’s with his new mate, who hasn’t been collared yet. Birot and I sit down on the slope under the stars, where I drink deep and wait for my heart to stop pounding, as we watch the trackers try to do something that looks to me like an exercise in futility: catch two slow lorises in 9-meter-tall (30–foot) bamboo.A loris’-eye-view of researchers. Photo by Andrew Walmsley/LFP.The Little Fireface Project — the local Sundanese word for the slow loris, muka geni, literally means “fire face” — is the brainchild of Anna Nekaris, the world’s leading expert on all things loris. She set up the organization in 2011 because she saw a need for long-term research on the species, especially since lorises that were confiscated from the illegal pet trade rarely survived once released back into the wild.“It was impossible to care for them or release them until we knew something about how they actually behave in the wild,” Nekaris explained.The LFP is the first long-term study of lorises, where scientists are gathering data on family groups over years.  This research is not only helping scientists better understand the needs of slow lorises in the wild, but is revealing their dramatic and, even scandalous, family lives.“The Little Fireface Project is the only long-term behavioral ecological research site that I know of not just for Javan slow lorises but for any slow loris species,” said Mary Blair, the director of biodiversity informatics research at the American Museum of Natural History, who is not involved with the LFP. Blair credits the project with “major advances” in the understanding of slow lorises’ behavioral ecology, including the first in-depth look at slow loris venom.Sitting on the Little Fireface balcony overlooking a local mosque, Sharon McCabe, field site coordinator and primatologist, told me what was so fascinating about her subjects.“I think they’re incredible. They can move in a way that I’ve never seen any other primate move. It’s as if they have two separate spines they can rotate independently of one another … kind of like a horror movie. I love them for that … They’re so intimidating and powerful in their own right.”They’re also critically endangered: the Javan slow loris has been hammered by forest loss and habitat destruction, the illegal pet trade, and even killing for traditional medicine and black magic. With 145 million people, Java is the most densely populated of Indonesia’s major islands. The island has already lost its tigers and elephants; slow lorises could be next.But the LFP has been able to turn the situation around, at least for its local lorises.last_img read more

Window tech could save billions of birds, and it’s already here

first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Interns, Research, Technology, Wildlife Banner image: The imprint left by a bird after colliding with a window. Image by Bill Gracey via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).Citations: Loss, S. R., Will, T., Loss, S. S., & Marra, P. P. (2014). Bird–building collisions in the United States: Estimates of annual mortality and species vulnerability. The Condor, 116(1), 8-23. doi:10.1650/condor-13-090.1Rosenberg, K. V., Dokter, A. M., Blancher, P. J., Sauer, J. R., Smith, A. C., Smith, P. A., … Marra, P. P. (2019). Decline of the North American avifauna. Science, 366(6461), 120-124. doi:10.1126/science.aaw1313 Close to one billion birds in the United States die each year from collisions with windows on buildings.Last year, a 48-year study reported that the overall bird population in the U.S. has declined by roughly 30% since 1970 in the United States.A variety of methods to prevent bird collisions could reduce these numbers, including the use of ultraviolet signature coatings on glass.Combining this technology with sustainable window solutions that control interior light and heat may make it easier for building owners to adopt bird-friendly materials. This may sound familiar: you’re sitting at home, absorbed in your daily activities, when THUD; a bird crashes into your window. You jump, or at least look up, and feel a moment of concern: “I hope it’s okay!” After inspecting the smudge on the glass, your next thought might be, “Well, there’s nothing I can do now — at least it was only one bird.”It turns out, “only one bird” is a pretty common occurrence. A recent study estimates that nearly a billion birds are killed annually from hitting windows — and that’s just in the U.S. No one knows how many die worldwide, but it would certainly be in the billions. And the impact of these losses may go well beyond just the birds involved.“People have no idea the ecological services that birds provide,” says Christine Sheppard, the bird collisions campaign manager at the American Bird Conservancy (ABC). She says birds play a crucial role in strengthening habitats against climate change, and helping ecosystems bounce back after disaster hits. “California burns down, and birds bring seed back in so habitats can regenerate,” she says.While simple solutions to bird collisions have existed for a while, newer window technology may make it easier for companies and individuals alike to adopt bird-safe solutions while also lowering energy costs and carbon emissions.How bad is one billion dead birds?By some estimates, these one billion deaths may account for 5 to 10% of the total U.S. bird population annually (estimated at 10 billion to 20 billion), making window collisions one of the biggest killers of birds. But assessing the severity of an issue like this can be difficult, especially when the number of birds in the U.S. drastically fluctuates each year due to migration, according to Sheppard.Matthew Kamm, a biologist and educator with Zoo New England, says migratory birds are often hit the hardest, especially the warblers. Hummingbirds and swifts, also migratory species, showed the highest risk among birds included in the report. The report also found that seven species that are among the most vulnerable are also listed nationally as “birds of conservation concern” by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and 10 of these most vulnerable species are listed regionally.While window collisions are not the sole cause of population decline for these struggling species, Sheppard says they can be detrimental to the already massive effort it takes for birds to re-establish healthy numbers.Hummingbird killed after strike with window. Image by beard14 via CCSearch CC BY-NC-SA 2.0“If you don’t worry about birds until they’re at the point of extinction, it’s phenomenally difficult to try to get them back,” she says, explaining that well before a bird is gone, its ecosystem begins to lose the critical services that it provides. This makes it even more difficult for birds to rebound in their changed environment.“The simple fact is, being a long distance migrant in the modern world is just harder than it used to be,” Kamm says.Before migratory birds even begin their journeys, increasingly unpredictable weather patterns caused by climate change can throw off their schedules. Once in the air, urban developments not only heighten the potential for building collisions, but also provide confusing light pollution at night and contribute to the loss of green spaces and insect prey that birds require to rest and recharge.“They’re more vulnerable to predators when they get to where they are going,” Kamm says. “It’s really a death from a thousand cuts.”The only two threats graver than window collisions are critical habitat loss and predation by domesticated cats, an invasive and predatory species. All these hazards have added up over the past 50 years. According to a study in Science this past year, 2.9 billion birds have disappeared in the United States since 1970, an estimated loss of about 30% of the population.Stats like this can be a canary in the coal mine for ecosystem integrity, predicting more dramatic disappearances to come.“Extinction begins with loss in abundance of individuals that can result in compositional and functional changes of ecosystems,” write the scientists behind the Science study that showed nearly 3 billion in losses.Potential solutionsBut bird deaths by collisions can be mitigated, according to the ABC, by a number of potential solutions. Some of these include easy do-it-yourself methods such as tempera paint and stick-on window decals. They also rate bird-safe products using tunnel tests, in which scientists measure how many birds fly toward a tunnel exit covered in clear glass versus the sample product.One type of solution that ABC approves is glass with “ultraviolet signatures,” which allow UV light to reflect off the outside of the window. Since most birds can see in ultraviolet, glass that reflects ultraviolet light sends the message that the space is occupied rather than an open patch of sky. For humans, the window remains transparent.What birds see, left, compared to what humans see looking through UV signature-coated glass. Image courtesy of Arnold Glas Corp.Although Sheppard is encouraged by technology like this, she says it still has its flaws. For example, not all birds can see in the UV range, and levels of UV light vary from place to place and throughout the course of the day.“I’m guessing that UV signatures are going to work a whole lot better in Phoenix, than in a place like Portland,” she says.Despite the flaws, Kamm says he thinks there is still a healthy demand for these solutions.“I feel like [bird-safe materials] should be an easier sell than, you know, some other environmental asks,” he says.Michael Reed, a professor at Tufts University specializing in avian ecology and conservation biology, stresses the importance of including bird-safe solutions in the conversation about sustainability in the first place, and says that everyone has their own perspective of what sustainable means.“Sustainability [reflects] what gets paid attention to as a social issue,” he says. “If people get behind [bird-safe solutions], that’s what will be the focus. But if no one talks about it, no one cares about it, then it’ll never rise to the top.”This is especially true for big companies and institutions: if bird-safe glass costs more than standard windows, companies will likely opt for the cheaper option. But to Reed, that demonstrates an opportunity.“If enough people raise a fuss,” he says, “then politicians listen and laws get passed that require companies to do something. I’m not sure the company would actually care, but they would do something about it, and as far as I’m concerned that might be sufficient.”Luckily for birds, social pressure may not be the only way to incentivize companies and individuals alike to start using safer materials.Several manufacturers provide bird-friendly UV signature glass in tandem with technology that regulates how much heat and light can pass through. Glass coatings such as Bird1st from Guardian Glass and ORNILUX from Arnold Glas add UV-reflecting stripes or patterns, and can be paired with low-emissivity (heat-filtering) and solar-control treatments. This combination allows windows to both maintain the temperatures inside the building and mitigate the number of bird collisions outside.Like transition eyeglass lenses, dynamic glass self-tints in reaction to the amount of sunlight it is exposed to throughout the day. It can also adapt to artificial light coming from within, which does birds a bonus favor by lowering light pollution that can confuse migratory birds at night.Unidentified bird looking at window. Image by guppiecat via CCSearch CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Controlling the internal climate can be attractive to building owners not only because it creates a comfortable space, but also because it reduces energy costs, helps earn LEED credit points, and can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.“It’s relatively straightforward to get people to consider birds during the design phase,” Sheppard says. “It shouldn’t add any cost to the building if you’re making this set of decisions as opposed to that set of decisions, because there’s a lot of overlap between bird-friendly glass and different ways to control heat and light and sometimes even security.”Beyond UV window technology, people are continuously looking for novel approaches to preventing collisions. One group is looking to develop nanomaterials that create signals birds can respond to and avoid, according to Sheppard. Another is working on sound nets that divert birds from an area using noise. While the actual implementation of these products may be tricky, new technologies like these could save birds from dangerous and undesirable areas, like airports.For Sheppard, no matter the method, saving birds from collisions ultimately comes down to including them in the environmental agenda, and pushing for action.“There are very few conservation issues where you can get information in the morning and do something about it in the afternoon,” she says. “Usually, it’s just depressing. But this is actually something almost anybody can do something about. We know what to do, we’ve just got to get everybody to do it.”last_img read more

Melecio says La Salle lacked communication in Game 1 loss

first_imgCoco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set The diminutive playmaker said the lack of communication was evident in the Green Archers’ 76-70 defeat to the Blue Eagles.READ: Ateneo holds on, beats La Salle in Game 1 of UAAP FinalsFEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBack on the throne“There are lots of instances that the coaches and players weren’t able to understand each other, and those happened in the crucial moments. I think that’s where things went wrong,” he said.Melecio and Ricci Rivero muffed their three-point attempts in the final minute that could have given La Salle a chance to tie the game. But what led to the La Salle’s downfall was its inability to communicate on the defensive end especially in the waning seconds, where Thirdy Ravena and Isaac Go connected for the game-sealing bucket in the final 10.4 seconds of the game. “We didn’t communicate that much inside the court, while Ateneo had great defense and execution. We think they had a better communication inside the court than us.”Melecio, however, isn’t putting too much thought on the defeat, noting that the Archers can still bounce back and extend the series to a deciding Game 3.“It’s better to lose in Game 1,” he said. “But we need to bounce back and adjust our execution against Ateneo. We know our performance was not enough, so we need to have better decisions in the next game.”ADVERTISEMENT View comments Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netCommunication is key to winning.And for Aljun Melecio, that’s exactly what La Salle lacked in Game 1 of the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball Finals on Saturday.ADVERTISEMENT Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Raptors ground Hawks Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ setcenter_img Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. MOST READ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Rodney a fighter for unity, justice and dignity (Pt 1)

first_imgDear Editor,June 13, 2018, is exactly 38 years since Walter Rodney was assassinated by the People’s National Congress (PNC) regime. It is a very significant anniversary, since Rodney would have been dead as long as he lived, thirty-eight years.Yet, this young man’s life is still remembered by ordinary people years after he died. He is being remembered because of the life that he lived, the contribution he made to the cause of the oppressed in Guyana, the Caribbean, Africa and the world.Walter Rodney was not just a substantial intellectual. He was recognised as a very powerful historian and his work on Africa’s history have become classics. The difference with Rodney and most of the other intellectuals was that he was an activist. Theory and practice went hand in hand. He was not an armchair general.He was an advocate of black power and was deeply concerned and moved by the plight of working people in Africa and the Diaspora.However, he was not a racist. In his application of black power to the Caribbean he was completely inclusive, it was for him all the oppressed peoples. He was one who advocated and worked for unity of working people. This was seen in his approach to the Guyanese situation in particular and to the Caribbean more generally.I have had the privilege to have heard many of the speeches he made when he returned to Guyana in 1974. I must of herd most of those delivered in Georgetown.To me, he was probably the only African Guyanese leader, outside of the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C), to have consistently carried a line for unity of all working people.  He never sought to use his obvious standing in society to put one race against the other. His intellectual integrity and honesty always came through in his every presentationThis is where he stood head and shoulder above his colleagues.Indeed, I have noted elsewhere he stood alongside Cheddi Jagan in the politics, in both content and form that he advocated. Honesty and sincerity are the hallmarks of this politics.That is why he took a strong position against the PNC regime. He stood for justice. He did not just blindly idolise black people. He also made a distinction between oppressors and oppressed in that group as well.His disdain for the PNC dictatorship was marked. He was truly saddened and moved by the way the PNC used race to mislead African Guyanese and to make the black working people develop hostility to the Indian working people. This was most manifested in his active support for Arnold Rampersaud, a PPP activist, who was framed with a murder, charged and the PNC worked hard to hang.It also came through clearly in his solidarity with the sugar workers strike in 1977.Today, we are observing his life’s work at a time when the gains we have made is being once again lost as the PNC-led A Partnership for National Unity regime has taken up where the PNC left.Sincerely,Donald RamotarFormer Presidentlast_img read more

Father charged for son’s murder

first_imgThe 44-year-old man who allegedly stabbed his 21-year-old son to death was on Wednesday hauled before the Cove and John Magistrate’s Court after he was slapped with the capital offence of murder.Mohan Sookdeo being escorted to court on WednesdayMohan Sookdeo, called “Wire”, of Lot 217 Fifth Street Foulis, Enmore, East Coast Demerara (ECD), appeared before Magistrate Wanda Fortune. The charge stated that on September 8, 2018, at Foulis, ECD, he murdered Satesh Kevin Sookdeo. He was remanded to prison until October 2.Reports are on September 8, 2018, at about 20:35h, the 44-year-old man and his wife had an argument during which he grabbed her by the neck and began choking her. The couple’s 21-year-old son, Satesh Sookdeo, along with another sibling attempted to part the couple but his father allegedly became enraged and broke a louvre pane and stabbed him to his chest.Neighbours rushed to the family’s aid after hearing screams, but by then the younger Sookdeo had already succumbed to the injuries. A post-mortem examination performed on his body proved that he died from perforation to the lung as a result of the stab wound to his chest.last_img read more

Local community gaming grant recipients get nearly $200,000

first_imgIn this case, the government is dealing with groups that fall into the Human, Social Services and Public Safety grant category.- Advertisement -The largest local grants of $33,000 and $32,500 go to the North Peace Cultural Society, and the Child Development Centre Society, respectively.Three groups are the recipients of grants in the $20,000 to $30,000 range and they include…Big Brothers and Big Sisters, $27,000…the North Peace Out-of-School Child Care Society, $23,333…and the Women’s Resource Society, $20,000.The total amount for the 12 local recipient groups is just under $200,000. A dozen groups in Fort St. John are on the 2010/11 list of Provincial Community Gaming Grant Recipients released today by the province.last_img

B.C. LNG Alliance head says at least one project could get go ahead in 2015

first_imgWhile David Keane commends the B.C. government’s recent moves to bolster the nascent industry, he says more work needs to be done when it comes to its greenhouse gas regulations.Specifically, Keane says industry players should be able to purchase carbon offsets throughout North America, not just in British Columbia.Speaking to natural gas conference in Calgary, Keane also lauded federal tax breaks for the industry announced last month by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, saying the move eliminates one major hurdle.- Advertisement -The B.C. LNG Alliance includes seven of the 19 LNG projects that are currently proposed for Canada’s West Coast, none of which have been given the official go-ahead by their backers.High construction costs and unsteady commodity markets have cast a pall over the industry, with many players, such as Malaysia’s Petronas, putting off making a final investment decision for their multibillion-dollar projects in recent months.last_img read more