Communities conserving local forest in El Salvador vote to ban mining

first_imgEl Salvador is considered the most-deforested country in Central America, but national efforts to protect remaining forest appear to be on the upswing in the tiny country.Cinquera, a municipality in northern El Salvador, has created its own forest preserve and attracted the attention of the national government.In February, residents voted to ban metallic mining in the region.On March 22, legislator Guillermo Mata announced that the legislative assembly’s multi-partisan environmental committee had approved the text of a law banning metallic mining. The bill is set to go to the floor for a vote this week, according to Mata. CINQUERA, El Salvador – It’s not far from town, but in the middle of the dry season, it’s a hot and dusty walk to the Cinquera Forest Ecological Park in northern El Salvador. Villagers in and around Cinquera took it upon themselves to protect the forest following the country’s 12-year armed conflict. Despite ongoing challenges, their efforts are palpable even at the entrance to the locally run 19-square-mile conservation area, where the trees tower over a cool stream.“We’re three park rangers,” Raquel Recinos, a park ranger from a nearby village, told a group getting ready to hit the trails. “We try to maintain the whole 5,001 hectares [19 square miles].”Interpretive signs along the well-maintained trails explain the different sights along the way, but it’s no ordinary nature walk. There’s the unmarked headstone next to a spot where human remains were exhumed. There’s the outdoor kitchen area, where guerrilla combatants used tunnels to disperse the smoke to avoid alerting the army to their position. And there’s the encampment where wounded combatants were treated, and where others learned to read and write.In the past, it was all logged, Recinos said. However, the civilian population had to flee the whole region in the early 1980s, when state armed forces carried out massacres and bombed towns. When people began to resettle Cinquera in 1991, a year before peace accords ended the conflict, they found a regenerating forest covering the hills. “They said, ‘well, Cinquera is a new Cinquera,’” and decided to conserve the forest, Recinos told Mongabay.The Cinquera Forest Ecological Park protects the forest that regenerated when the civilian population was forced to flee due to atrocities committed by the army during the 1980-1992 armed conflict in El Salvador. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayRaquel Recinos is one of three park rangers at the community-run Cinquera Forest Ecological Park. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayBombs displayed in Cinquera’s central plaza, in front of the church, serve as a reminder of El Salvador’s 12-year armed conflict. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayResidents of the municipality of Cinquera are taking it upon themselves to protect the lands and resources in their little area of El Salvador in the face of deforestation and water crises. Most recently, on February 26, residents also took to the polls in a municipal referendum and voted to ban all metallic mining activities.The smallest and most densely populated country in Central America, El Salvador is also the most deforested. Due to its high population density and volcanic soils, most of its lands have been dedicated to agriculture, and slash-and-burn practices are still common, Salvadoran government officials report. The combination of deforestation and changing rainfall patterns, with increased periods of drought recently, means that when the rains do come, they increasingly wash farmland topsoil down into the Pacific Ocean, according to the San Salvador-based Foundation for Socioeconomic Development and Environmental Restoration.“Due to demographics, even just because of that, there’s more pressure on natural resources,” Angel Ibarra, the country’s vice minister of the environment and natural resources, told Mongabay. “We have a lower percentage of forest and vegetation cover than the other [Central American] countries.”The country lost 6.2 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2015, according to Global Forest Watch, and the tree cover loss in the Cabañas department, where Cinquera is located, was 8.6 percent during that same period. Only two percent of the nation’s existing forests are primary forest, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization.Cinquera is located in northern El Salvador’s Cabañas department, an area with a tree cover loss rate higher than the country as a whole. The community-established Cinquera Forest Ecological Park aims to protect forest that regenerated during El Salvador’s 12-year armed conflict.“But the important thing about this issue of deforestation, which is linked to the loss of biodiversity, linked to the loss of soil fertility, and linked to unsustainable farming practices and more, is starting to be tackled by the state,” Ibarra said.Last year, the Salvadoran government launched an ambitious initiative to address environmental degradation head-on. The National Plan for Reforestation and Restoration of Ecosystems and Countryside is starting off by focusing on five priority areas, with a long-term plan to reforest or restore one million hectares by 2030.“That’s approximately 50 percent of the country’s territory, so it’s no small thing,” Ibarra said. The plan does involve planting trees, but it won’t be pure reforestation, because 70 percent of the country’s lands are already dedicated to agriculture, he said. “It means improving farming practices, it means agroecology, it means watershed restoration, and it means biodiversity protection.”However, according to Ibarra, the government won’t be able to meet its goals on its own – it’s going to require a shift in culture and the participation of municipal government and communities. “We don’t have a magic wand to stop all deforestation,” he said.Seated next to vice minister of the environment and natural resources Ángel Ibarra (right), El Salvador’s human rights ombudsman Raquel Caballero spoke at a February 26 press conference in Cinquera, in support of the municipal referendum on mining. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayIbarra and other high-level officials were in Cinquera on February 26 to observe and support a referendum on mining. Due in large part to the country’s small size and environmental challenges, the executive branch of the government has a moratorium suspending all administrative actions regarding mining. They do not grant any new permits or licenses. Aside from small-scale gold mining in one region, there are currently no operating metallic mines in the country, and the moratorium has prevented any shift from the exploration phase to exploitation.Mining ban gains groundAfter years of actions and campaigns by communities and NGOs organized in a National Roundtable against Metallic Mining, then-president Antonio Saca, of the right-wing ARENA party, announced a moratorium on new mining projects in 2008, towards the end of his term. The next two presidents, Mauricio Funes and current president Salvador Sánchez Cerén, maintained administrative moratoriums on metallic mining activities by executive decree.Funes and Sánchez Cerén are both from the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) party, named after the left-wing guerrilla forces that formed the party following peace accords signed 25 years ago. Due to the actions and campaigns around the country, the FMLN included a ban on metallic mining in its platform, but the party didn’t have the votes to pass legislation to that effect until very recently, after the referendum in Cinquera.On March 9, San Salvador Archbishop José Luis Escobar Alas led a march to the legislative assembly, calling on lawmakers to pass a bill permanently banning metallic mining in the country. Legislators from GANA, ARENA, and the FMLN – the three main political parties in the country – received the protesters and pledged their parties’ support. On March 22, FMLN legislator Guillermo Mata announced that the legislative assembly’s multi-partisan environmental committee had approved the text of a law banning metallic mining. The bill is set to go to the floor for a vote this week, according to Mata.For years, however, because communities and NGOs were unable to make headway with proposed bills to ban mining nationally, they turned to legal mechanisms at the local level. If residents can gather signatures from 40 percent of registered voters in their municipality on an issue of local concern, municipal authorities must convoke an official municipal referendum, known as a consulta popular in El Salvador’s Municipal Code.Cinquera is the fifth municipality in the country to hold a referendum on mining. The initiative was spearheaded by the community member-based Municipal Reconstruction and Development Association (ARDM) in Cinquera, along with other local and national groups. The ARDM is also the force behind the Cinquera Forest Ecological Park and several other environmental and community development initiatives.“It’s a historic day in our municipality to be carrying out this referendum process in Cinquera,” ARDM president Iván Hernández told Mongabay on February 26 outside the mayor’s office, where residents lined up to vote. Three other polling stations were set up in different communities around the municipality.Residents staffing the polling station in San Benito sign in their first voter in Cinquera’s municipal referendum on mining. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayResidents in the village of Cinquera itself voted on mining at a polling station set up outside the municipal mayor’s office. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayAcross the street, Ibarra and other high-level government officials spoke at an outdoor press conference at the edge of Cinquera’s central plaza while voting was underway. Some of the national and international observers present to observe the process throughout the municipality stood in a row behind them. While most of the observers were individuals coordinated by NGOs, government observers from the Office of the Human Rights Ombudsman were also present at each of the polling stations.“In my capacity as a defender of the people, I’m here to verify the referendum process that the citizens of this region are carrying out today,” Raquel Caballero, who heads the office, told reporters.Caballero’s office supports local citizen engagement to help people decide what kinds of development projects they want in their municipality. At the same time, her office and many other executive branch offices and cabinet ministers openly oppose all metallic mining in the country.“Economic interests can’t be put ahead of life, of the environment,” vice secretary of citizen participation, transparency, and anti-corruption Lourdes Palacios said at the February 26 press conference in Cinquera. “Profits are the only thing that interests some companies that want to turn our environment in El Salvador simply into a commodity.”By the end of the day, more than half of all registered voters had participated in the referendum in Cinquera, a municipality with a total population of fewer than 2,000 people. Nearly all of them voted against mining. Cinquera mayor Pantaleón Carmelo Noyola read the results over a sound system set up outside the mayor’s office, and the final tallies sparked applause and a few celebratory firecrackers.All in all, 526 of 997 registered voters cast a ballot. Eight people voted in favor of mining, one ballot was void, and another was blank. The other 98.1 percent of participants voted against all metallic mining exploration and exploitation activities in the municipality of Cinquera.A Cinquera resident casts his ballot in the February 26 municipal referendum on mining. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for Mongabay“I feel satisfied and proud, because it’s a pretty big commitment,” Noyola told Mongabay shortly after announcing the results of the referendum. “The process that follows now is the preparation of a [municipal] ordinance,” he said. His office will then send the ordinance for publication in El Salvador’s official government gazette, making the local ban on mining official.Cinquera is the first municipality in the Cabañas department to hold a referendum on mining. The first four that have taken place since September 2014 – in San José las Flores, San Isidro Labrador, Nueva Trinidad, and Arcatao – were all in the neighboring Chalatenango department. Noyola hopes his colleagues in the other eight municipalities in Cabañas will follow suit.“It’s a wonderful exercise, a democratic exercise,” he said. “I urge [the other mayors in Cabañas] to work on this, because they’ll be working to protect life for the next generation.”Vidalina Morales also hopes the referendum process will spread further into Cabañas. Now the president of the Association for the Economic and Social Development of Santa Marta (ADES), she has been involved in the region’s community-based fight against mining for more than a decade.“Today is a special day for us as residents of the department of Cabañas, since it’s also the department where we’ve taken up the cause of this struggle,” Morales told Mongabay in Cinquera, where she came to support the local referendum.International arbiter turns the tables on one mining companyAlong with community-based environmental committees, Morales and ADES have been at the forefront of a struggle against a particular mining project in Cabañas. After years of exploration activities, Pacific Rim, a Canadian mining company, was planning on moving forward with its proposed El Dorado gold mine. Local and national groups were actively campaigning against the company’s plans, and putting pressure on officials to block the project. In 2008, the Salvadoran government denied the company’s applications for environmental and exploitation permits, citing environmental and health concerns.In 2009, one of Pacific Rim’s wholly owned subsidiaries took the issue to the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), filing a claim against El Salvador. Pacific Rim has since been acquired by Australian-Canadian mining company OceanaGold, but the claim continued to move forward in ICSID, an international arbitration tribunal based out of the World Bank Group in Washington, DC. Initially $77 million, the company later increased its requested damages to $301 million for the profits it claims would have resulted from the mine.In October 2016, the ICSID arbitration panel came to a decision. The panel rejected the company’s claim and ordered it pay El Salvador $8 million for legal costs incurred by the country over the course of the seven-year case. In an October 14, 2016, media release, the company initially stated that “OceanaGold will review the ICSID’s ruling in detail before evaluating the next steps related to its El Salvador business unit.”Last month, 280 unions, research centers, environmental organizations, and other groups from several countries sent the company a letter demanding it “pay up and pack up.” They urged the company and its subsidiaries to leave El Salvador and comply with the payment established by the ICSID ruling. The government’s legal fees and expenses actually amounted to more than $13 million, they noted.OceanaGold does plan on complying with the ruling, according to the company. “We remain committed to following due process as set by the ICSID and World Bank for these matters and we fully respect the decision announced by the ICSID regarding the $8 million for legal costs, we are not disputing that,” a company spokesperson told Mongabay via email.The delay in payment is due to an ongoing ICSID matter, according to OceanaGold. In December 2016, after the main arbitration proceedings were closed, the Salvadoran government submitted additional filings for a supplementary decision on the award. Both parties submitted observations throughout December.“These additional considerations are now currently under review by the ICSID tribunal,” the OceanaGold spokesperson wrote. “We reserve our right for the ICSID tribunal’s decision on the [Government of El Salvador] filings and take the time allowed under the tribunal process to review.”In their letter to the company, the 280 groups also urged OceanaGold to address other issues linked to the company’s presence in the country: Over the past decade, several local anti-mining activists in Cabañas have been killed, including a pregnant woman; others report threats and intimidation. Activists’ claims that the company and its predecessor are behind the threats and violence have not been substantiated in a court of law. However, most of the cases of threats and killings have yet to result in any prosecution.“OceanaGold should cooperate fully in a full, impartial investigation into the murders and threats that have taken place in connection with this conflict over the years,” the organizations wrote in their February 21, 2017 letter.“Mining Contaminates And Kills” reads a mural in Cinquera, less than 30 miles from the El Dorado mining project locals link to conflict and killings. Photo by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayMorales says she’s been subject to many threats over the years, and wants the company out of the country. “That’s our specific demand. Two things: that [the company] pay the eight million, and that it pack its bags and leave El Salvador,” she said.Working towards a sustainable futureLess than 30 miles west of OceanaGold’s El Dorado project, Cinquera residents are working to make sure history doesn’t repeat itself in their lands. Beyond the February 26 referendum on mining, they’re endeavoring to advance a different kind of development at the local level.ARDM is working promotes sustainable agriculture practices and runs several community projects, including a hotel, a local history museum, an iguana protection and reproduction area, and the forest ecological park. One of the group’s main focuses is the environment, said Hernández, the group’s president.“We contribute to the protection of our whole natural area,” he said. The ecological park is a key component of the group’s conservation efforts, and it’s been successful in attracting Salvadoran and international visitors since opening to the public in 2000. “Every year the number of tourists visiting increases,” Hernández said.The park is also visited by countless non-human species, and biologists have come from San Salvador, the country’s capital, to survey and document its wildlife. Community park ranger Raquel Recinos darts inside the little office at the entrance to retrieve the statistics on the biodiversity found within the park.According to the biologists’ studies, Recinos told Mongabay, there are 27 species of mammals, 138 kinds of birds, and more than 2,000 insect species, including 140 types of butterflies. Asked about the mammals, she begins to list the species, and a former guerrilla combatant being trained as a park tour guide listening to the interview chimes in with others. Their combined list includes ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), lowland paca (Cuniculus paca), collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), and many other species.The Cinquera Forest Ecological Park is run by locals, but they’ve had a good working relationship with the national government over the past four or five years, Recinos said. The government now finances one of the three park ranger positions. But ARDM is still the driving force behind local conservation, she said: “We try to do everything humanly possible to be able to protect the forest and flora and fauna.”Citations:Hansen, M. C., P. V. Potapov, R. Moore, M. Hancher, S. A. Turubanova, A. Tyukavina, D. Thau, S. V. Stehman, S. J. Goetz, T. R. Loveland, A. Kommareddy, A. Egorov, L. Chini, C. O. Justice, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2013. “High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change.” Science 342 (15 November): 850–53. Data available on-line from:http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest. Accessed through Global Forest Watch on Marc 28, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgBanner image by Sandra Cuffe for MongabayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Community Forestry, Community-based Conservation, Conflict, Deforestation, Ecological Restoration, Environment, Environmental Policy, Featured, Forests, Law, Mining, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Restoration, Tropical Forests, War last_img read more

Canceled: Plans for a bridge in a critical wildlife area in Borneo have been scrapped

first_imgPlans for the Sukau Bridge, crossing the Kinabatangan River near a wildlife sanctuary in Malaysian Borneo, raised a global outcry.“We are not going ahead with the bridge,” Sabah Forest Department Chief Conservator Sam Mannan announced at an event in London.In explaining his decision, Mannan reportedly cited a recent letter by celebrated naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough, as well as concerns expressed by scientists, NGOs and corporations. Controversial plans to build a bridge over the Kinabatangan River in Malaysian Borneo’s Sabah state have been canceled, announced Sabah Forest Department Chief Conservator Sam Mannan.The announcement was made Wednesday evening during a South East Asia Rainforest Research Partnership (SEARRP) event in London.“We are not going ahead with the bridge,” Mannan said, according to Malaysian news site The Star Online. “In making this decision, Chief Minister of Sabah Datuk Seri Musa Aman has taken into consideration all the concerns and opinions expressed related to the bridge, including those from Yayasan Sime Darby, Nestle, scientists and NGO groups and also the opinion of someone who knows the territory better than anybody else – Sir David Attenborough.”Last month, celebrated naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough voiced his criticism of the bridge plans in a letter published in the Guardian.“If this construction is allowed to go ahead, I am left in no doubt that the bridge will have significant negative effects on the region’s wildlife, the Kinabatangan’s thriving tourism industry and on the image of Sabah as a whole,” Attenborough wrote.Oil palm near the Kinabatangan River in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The plans called for a 350-meter (1,148 feet) bridge crossing Kinabatangan river in Sabah, and the paving of a connected gravel road.Its construction was proposed as part of the 2008 Sabah Development Corridor, a plan aimed at transforming the state into a leading economic region and investment destination.The bridge would replace an existing ferry service, and its proponents argue it would cut travel times for goods and people and connect villages south of the river to hospitals and other services.Conservationists fear the bridge’s construction would tear apart habitat for endangered elephants, primates and birds in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, a patchwork of protected areas that runs along the namesake river. The paved road would run directly through part of the sanctuary.Much of the nearby forest has been lost to oil palm plantations, making remaining wildlife corridors particularly crucial, experts argue.“The bridge and the road would have a direct impact on wildlife populations, and especially elephants, orangutans and proboscis monkeys,” said Benoit Goossens, the director of the Danau Girang Field Centre in Sabah, in a January statement.“The new public road that will subsequently follow the bridge will cut off the last remaining uninhabited route for elephants near Sukau, which will have catastrophic consequences for both the animals and the people. Major conflicts will arise, deaths (elephant attacks on people, elephants shot or poisoned) will occur. Moreover, we will increase easy penetration of poachers into protected forests, especially of ivory traders,” Goossens added.Some have also questioned the economic value of the bridge. Sabah Tourism, Culture and Environment Minister Seri Masidi Manjun warned this month that the bridge’s construction could destroy plans to boost ecotourism in Sabah and put at risk the livelihoods of people already working in the tourist industry.A pair of orphaned orangutan in Sabah, Malaysia. The Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary is home to a sizeable population of the endangered great ape.Yayasan Sime Darby, the philanthropic wing of the palm oil giant, also threatened to “review” its projects in the area if the bridge went through.Fears that construction was imminent were raised in January, when the Danau Field Centre spotted work crews clearing forest to make room for machinery storage and an office for the construction contractor.However, officials said that work would not begin until an environmental impact survey had been completed.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Infrastructure, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Roads center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

2 new reptiles discovered in Sumatra

first_imgA newly discovered snake in Takengon, in the highlands of Aceh province, was named for one of Indonesia’s few herpetologists.The snake is non-venomous, but it mimics the characteristics of its venomous cousins as a survival technique.The other creature, a lizard, inhabits the forests along central Sumatra’s western coast. BOGOR, Indonesia — Scientists have discovered two new reptiles in the jungles of Sumatra island — home to the nation’s highest deforestation rate.Lycodon sidiki has become the seventh species endemic to the Sunda Shelf — a biogeographical term that encompasses most of Southeast Asia — in the largest family of snakes, Colubridae, according to an article in the June edition of Herpetologica.The snake can be found in the forested highlands of Takengon in Aceh province. It has rough back scales from raised ridges, a banded abdomen and no scale in front of its eyes.“This snake is non-venomous, but it mimics the characters and behaviors of venomous species as its survival technique,” said Amir Hamidy, a herpetologist from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) who was involved in the research.The scientists named the snake in honor of Irvan Sidik, one of Indonesia’s few herpetologists. Sidik was also involved the recent creation of a new genus of tree-dwelling toad in the country.Lycodon sidiki. Photo via the journal Zootaxa.The journal also reported the first cataloging of Pseudocalotes baliomus, a lizard in the forests along central Sumatra’s western coast. It has slightly enlarged, heavily keeled scales along its flanks, a white spot on its shoulder blade and a relatively long fifth toe.The lizard’s name is derived from a Greek word and refers to its white shoulder blotches. It was first actualy first discovered by Dutch colonial officer Salomon Mullerin the 1830s, but it was only identified after the researchers collected samples in 2013, Hamidy said.The team — composed of scientists from Boward College, Brawijaya University the University of Texas at Arlington in 2013-2016 — will ask the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to include the two species in its Red List of Threatened Species.Pseudocalotes boliomus, the newly discovered lizard from western Sumatra’s coastal forests. Photo via the journal Zootaxa.Scientists believe more than 80 percent of the world’s species remain undiscovered. Identifying them contributes to an “understanding of the ecological and evolutionary processes which created, and which are struggling to maintain, the diverse biological riches we are heir to,” wrote Robert M. May, a zoologist at the University of Oxford.“Without this knowledge, we cannot even begin to answer questions such as how much diversity we can lose while still maintaining the ecosystem services that humanity depends upon,” he added.In 2012, Sumatra contributed almost half of Indonesia’s primary forest loss of 840,000 hectares (3,243 square miles) — now greater than that of Brazil, previously the highest in the world. Another report estimated that Sumatra lost 7.5 million hectares of forest between 1990 and 2010, mostly due to logging.Banner image: Lycodon sidiki, the newly discovered snake in the highlands of Indonesia’s Aceh province. Photo via the journal Zootaxa.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on June 25, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by mongabayauthor Animals, Biodiversity, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Lizards, New Species, Rainforests, Reptiles, Snakes, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Colombia expands indigenous reserves near key deforestation hotspot

first_imgThe Puerto Sabalo – Los Monos and Monochoa indigenous reserves are both located in the province of Caquetá, which has the highest rate of forest loss in Colombia.The expansion of the two reserves connects Chiribiquete with Predio Putumayo, the country’s largest indigenous reserve, creating a conservation corridor slightly larger than the entire country of Honduras.A recent report by the Mapping the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) shows that cattle ranching and agricultural development have opened a new deforestation hotspot in Caquetá province’s Amazon rainforests — and that deforestation is expanding towards Chiribiquete National Park. The Colombian government announced yesterday the expansion of two indigenous reserves in the buffer zone of Serrania de Chiribiquete, the South American country’s largest national park.The Puerto Sabalo – Los Monos and Monochoa indigenous reserves are both located in the province of Caquetá, which has the highest rate of forest loss in Colombia. Puerto Sabalo – Los Monos will be expanded from 211,480 to 624,580 hectares (522,578 to 1.54 million acres), while Monochoa will increase from 263,093 to 417,883 hectares (650,116 to a little over one million acres).The expansion of the two reserves connects Chiribiquete with Predio Putumayo, the country’s largest indigenous reserve, creating a conservation corridor slightly larger than the entire country of Honduras.The move is part of the Colombian government’s overall strategy of adaptation to climate change, per the announcement. The creation of connectivity corridors between protected areas and indigenous territories will also allow for the movement of wildlife and the healthy functioning of ecosystems. “In addition, it specifies the titling of lands to indigenous communities as one of the most important strategies to reduce deforestation, forest degradation and ensure the protection of their fundamental rights,” the announcement states (translated from Spanish).“The expansion of these two areas adds a large area of pristine rain forest — over half million hectares, for protection and management by indigenous peoples, and fulfills a peace process commitment by President Santos,” Enrique Ortiz, program director for the Washington, D.C.-based Andes Amazon Fund, told Mongabay. “The expansion area is contiguous to a rapidly changing part of Colombia, and closes a gap between previously existing indigenous lands and protected areas, forming a strategic connectivity corridor, perhaps one of the largest in the Amazon. It also protects uncontacted indigenous people, a highly important human rights responsibility for Colombia.”According to Virginia-based NGO the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), which worked with the government of Colombia and local communities to create the conservation corridor, expansion of the reserves will empower the indigenous peoples of the region, the Murui Muina (Witoto), “composed of more than 40 clans that survived the atrocities of the rubber boom,” while also safeguarding the rights of isolated indigenous tribes that are currently threatened by deforestation and other impacts of development in the region.Map courtesy of the Amazon Conservation Team.“In Colombia, the annual deforestation rates inside tenure-secure indigenous forestlands were 2 times lower than those on similar land without security,” ACT noted in a statement issued in response to the expansion of the reserves.A recent report by the Mapping the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) shows that cattle ranching and agricultural development have opened a new deforestation hotspot in Caquetá province’s Amazon rainforests. MAAP director Matt Finer told Mongabay that this deforestation hotspot is expanding deeper into primary forest, towards Chiribiquete National Park.“The deforestation data indicates settlement patterns expanding outward from the Caguán River into more remote and intact areas, including those closer to Chiribiquete National Park,” the report states. “High-resolution imagery from 2017 shows extensive deforestation since 2011. The major cause of deforestation appears to be gradually expanding cattle ranching and agricultural plots.”This map of 2001-2015 tree cover loss shows how the area MAAP zooms in on was intact forest landscape (IFL) in 2000. The area shown lost about 3,500 ha of IFL tree cover (2001-2015); MAAP’s analysis shows conversion is encroaching further into surrounding IFLs.The Colombian Amazon covers approximately 119 million acres, just over six percent of the total Amazon biome, much of which has remained intact in large part due to the civil conflict that has been waged in the country since the 1960s. According to the MAAP report, Colombia already has an extensive system of protected areas and indigenous reserves, as well, covering nearly three-fourths of the Colombian Amazon.But now that the Colombian conflict is coming to an end, deforestation is on the rise. “In the Colombian Amazon alone, an estimated 70,000 hectares were deforested in 2016, an almost 25% percentage increase from 2015,” ACT’s Isidoro Hazbun told Mongabay in an email. “This is a region that has received significant development investments in recent years for cattle ranching and cash crop enterprises, which require large areas of land and are water-intensive, as well as for infrastructure, such as the $1 billion USD Marginal de la Selva highway project.”Hazbun adds that the administration of President Juan Manuel Santos has shown a commitment to protecting Colombia’s forests, as exemplified by its pledges, made as part of the Paris Climate Agreement, to achieve zero net deforestation in the Amazon by 2020 and reduce emissions 20 percent below business-as-usual projections by 2030.Germany, Norway, and the United Kingdom have collectively supplied $300 million to help Colombia reach its ambitious goals to halt deforestation. “For the first time in history, three donor countries joined hands with a large tropical forest country to provide funding based on verified emission reductions from deforestation,” Hazbun said.Despite these efforts, Hazbun notes that there is every indication that Colombia’s deforestation targets will not be met. “That being said, transparent publication of deforestation figures demonstrates not only the willingness of the Colombian government to confront the issue, but also that national monitoring systems are functioning,” he said. “Today decision-makers and the public at large understand the magnitude of the challenge, something that previously was unclear to most. At present, Colombia is at a crucial historical turning point, where if it perpetuates unsustainable conceptions of national development, it will suffer great losses to its natural heritage.”The Andes Amazon Fund’s Ortiz said that he is hopeful that the newly expanded conservation corridor in Caquetá province will help slow the rate of forest destruction. “I do firmly believe this indigenous reserve expansion is a great move towards ensuring otherwise imminent degradation of forests, as can be observed in other areas further to the northwest,” he said. “These newly added areas will prevent new land use concessions. Their inhabitants and institutions will need further support to repel or discourage invasions and unsustainable land use activities.”Map courtesy of MAAP.CITATIONSGreenpeace, University of Maryland, World Resources Institute and Transparent World. “Intact Forest Landscapes. 2000/2013” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on July 13, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgHansen, M. C., P. V. Potapov, R. Moore, M. Hancher, S. A. Turubanova, A. Tyukavina, D. Thau, S. V. Stehman, S. J. Goetz, T. R. Loveland, A. Kommareddy, A. Egorov, L. Chini, C. O. Justice, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2013. “High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change.” Science 342 (15 November): 850–53. Data available on-line from: http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest. Accessed through Global Forest Watch on July 13, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgHettler, B., Thieme, A., & Finer, M. (2017). Patterns of Deforestation in the Colombian Amazon. MAAP Colombia: 1.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Agriculture, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forest Loss, Forests, Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, National Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

A forgotten promise to forests? (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Rainforests, Researcher Perspective Series, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img In 2016, global tree cover loss spiked 51 percent over the previous year — resulting in a loss of forests the size of New Zealand. Needless to say, losing enough trees to cover the entirety of New Zealand in one year is worrisome for the climate.To follow through on their promise to protect forests and end climate change, countries can and must do more to reverse these trends. Although many countries allude to their intentions to reduce emissions from forests in their official contributions to the Paris Agreement, too few include explicit or ambitious goals to do so.It should go without saying that developed countries have the responsibility to lead by example. This makes the European Union’s recent decision allowing members to increase forest harvests all the more concerning.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The lungs of the planet let out a long sigh of relief when given their own special place in the Paris Agreement in 2015. It’s not every day the trees in our collective backyard get such a prominent nod of respect for the important role they play in safeguarding human existence. But there it was, spelled out clearly in the landmark climate accord, with language urging all countries to conserve and enhance forests.The math shows that halting climate change is impossible without forests. Combined with phasing out fossil fuels and a transition to clean energy, reducing emissions from forests is critical. As new research suggests, the land sector — which includes forests — could provide more than one-third of the overall cost-effective emissions reductions the world needs by 2030. Notably, forests have the potential to deliver over two-thirds of those reductions. There are very few cost-effective and practical ways to combat climate change, and ending deforestation and scaling-up reforestation are two especially important methods.Despite concerted efforts to address the problem, deforestation and forest degradation have been on the rise. In 2016, global tree cover loss spiked 51 percent over the previous year — resulting in a loss of forests the size of New Zealand. Needless to say, losing enough trees to cover the entirety of New Zealand in one year is worrisome for the climate. Not to mention the impacts on the more than one billion people who depend on forests for their livelihoods or the loss of innumerable plants and animals that call forests home.To follow through on their promise to protect forests and end climate change, countries can and must do more to reverse these trends. Although many countries allude to their intentions to reduce emissions from forests in their official contributions to the Paris Agreement, too few include explicit or ambitious goals to do so. Currently, the individual goals countries have put forward as part of the Paris Agreement set us on a trajectory of at least 3°C of warming, double the most ambitious goal of the agreement to limit warming to 1.5°C.Autumn colors in boreal forest along Finland’s Kilpisjärji Lake. Norwegian mountains in the background. Photo © Mauri Rautkari / WWF.Intentional emphasis is placed on forests in the Paris Agreement, which lays out clear expectations for countries to protect forests. While slowing deforestation in the tropics is an important piece of the puzzle, all countries committed to conserve forests as part of the Paris Agreement. From the boreal to the tropics, both developed and developing countries are expected to take immediate action to protect forests. It should go without saying that developed countries have the responsibility to lead by example.This makes the European Union’s recent decision allowing members to increase forest harvests all the more concerning. The EU will permit members to cut down more trees in managed forests through 2030, and claims this decision is consistent with the objectives of the Paris Agreement as long as emissions from harvests do not exceed emissions absorbed by the overall land sector. But timing is key: Emissions released by harvests now will not be reabsorbed completely for decades. And, at the end of the day, an increase is an increase — an alarming rebuke of the level of urgency required. At a time when drastic efforts are needed to reduce emissions from all sectors, there is no wiggle room to increase emissions from forests.By pushing the need to act down the road, the EU is ignoring its pledge to the Paris Agreement and setting a dangerous precedent. Other countries have already employed artful dodges to avoid meaningful climate action, and others could follow suit. There is an acute need for oversight and transparency to ensure that countries do not shirk their responsibility to protect the climate and forests. As countries continue to debate the details of how the Paris Agreement will work in practice, they must push for strong rules and hold each other accountable for all sources of emissions and transparent and accurate reporting.There must be zero tolerance for planned deforestation in the name of climate change action. Countries cannot be allowed to pretend that a successful bid to end climate change does not include immediate action to protect forests. Failing to take stronger action now will cement an uncertain path for the planet, for forests, and for people.Typical autumn boreal landscape in the Finnish Lappland. Photo © Mauri Rautkari / WWF.CITATIONSChao, S. (2012). Forest Peoples: Numbers Across the World. Forest Peoples Programme.Griscom, B. W. et al. (2017). Natural Climate Solutions. PNAS 114 (44): 11645–50. doi:10.1073/pnas.1710465114Josefina Braña-Varela is Senior Director, Forest and Climate and Karen Petersen is Program Officer, Forest and Climate at WWF.last_img read more

Sumatran elephant sanctuary under threat from bridge, port projects

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Basten Gokkon Animals, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Elephants, Environment, Forest Elephants, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Sumatran Elephant, Wildlife center_img Both the planned bridge and private port in southern Sumatra would be built in an area that includes a key wildlife sanctuary that’s home to 152 critically endangered Sumatran elephants.The bridge would link to an island being developed for tourism, while the port would serve a pulpwood mill operated by Asia Pulp & Paper.Environmentalists have called for minimal disruption to the habitat if the projects go ahead, including elevated roads and strict zoning to ensure the elephants can co-exist alongside the anticipated influx of people.An attempt was made in 1982 to relocate the elephants from the area to make way for a migrant colony, but the elephants moved back and the area was subsequently designated as a sanctuary. PALEMBANG, Indonesia — The planned construction of a bridge and private port in southern Sumatra threatens to damage one of the last remaining habitats of the island’s critically endangered elephants.The project is part of the South Sumatra provincial government’s tourism development drive, under which it plans to build a bridge from the Sumatran mainland to the island of Bangka. The site where the bridge will begin has also been earmarked for construction of a private port by a subsidiary of Indonesia’s biggest paper producer, Asia Pulp & Paper (APP).Environmentalists say both proposed projects will damage a crucial habitat of the Sumatran elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus), a critically endangered species whose population has plunged as a result of habitat loss, human-wildlife conflicts, and poaching.Forests in the area are already under intense pressure. APP’s pulp and paper mill, said to be the biggest in Indonesia, has been lambasted by critics who say it will drive APP’s appetite for pulpwood, compelling the company to clear more natural forest and peatlands. The mill has a greater production capacity than initially advertised.Sumatran elephants in the Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Sanctuary in sourthern Sumatra. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia.The location in question includes the Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Sanctuary, a particularly important hub for the elephants as it connects smaller populations in several other fragments of forest. Combined, these peatland habitats are home to an estimated 152 elephants, according to Jumiran, a local elephant conservation official. In December last year, conservation groups recorded five new elephant calves, indicating that the population is thriving in the sanctuary.If the authorities have any intention to ensure the elephants’ continued survival, they should protect the area from any future development, said Yusuf Bahtimi, from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), who has studied this region of Sumatra extensively.For instance, he said, any roads connecting to the planned bridge or port should be elevated, to allow the elephants to continue wandering below. “We can make that happen,” he said. “We made it to the moon, so protecting the elephant corridor and habitat should be easy.”Yusuf also said the government should anticipate an influx of people to the area once the infrastructure projects were underway. To prevent unchecked sprawl and destruction of the forest, “the government must zone the area properly and correctly.“[It should] state clearly which areas can be developed for what purposes, and which must be protected,” he added. “The areas to be protected include the corridors and habitats of the Sumatran elephant, peatland, and forests.“Failing to do so will result in conflicts between humans and elephants, which the elephants will lose.”Yusuf also warned against a proposal to relocate the elephants from the area, saying this had been tried here in 1982, when the national government was incentivizing residents of Java to move to other islands across Indonesia.“It failed,” he said of the relocation. “The elephants were moved because the location for the transmigration program was in their habitat. But the relocated elephants returned to the habitat.”Since then, Yusuf said, authorities had allowed the area to revert to the wildlife sanctuary that it is today. The only solution, he said, “is to live in peace with the elephants.”That’s what locals have been doing for years, according to Edi Rusman, a farmer in Perigi Talangnangka village, near the wildlife sanctuary. He said there had never been any human-elephant conflicts there involving local residents, and that any conflicts that did arise involved migrants and companies operating in the area.“Any type of development will create conflicts if it doesn’t protect the elephant habitat,” Edi said. “So be careful with doing development.”A Sumatran elephant at the wildlife sanctuary. Image by Yusuf Bahtimi/CIFOR.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Aug. 13, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Expansion of a famous elephant park holds out hope for Africa’s big tuskers

first_imgEight of Africa’s remaining 30 “big tuskers” live in South Africa’s Tembe Elephant Park.The park is set to be expanded by up to 26,000 hectares, allowing its herd of 200 to grow.The park is owned and managed by local communities. DURBAN, South Africa — There is a scene at the start of the film Last of the Big Tuskers where a man is having his upper arm tattooed.As the artist puts the finishing touches to the work and dabs away blood, the camera pans out and an inky face with enormous tusks emerges.Elephants have always had a way of getting under people’s skin.That much was clear at the South African premiere of the documentary, which played to a nearly full theater in Durban this week. Much of the documentary, which focuses on the plight of Africa’s big and super-tuskers — elephants with tusks exceeding 45 kilograms (100 pounds) each — is filmed in South Africa’s Tembe Elephant Park, immediately south of the border with Mozambique, 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of Durban.Hunted relentlessly across the continent since the late 1800s, it is estimated that fewer than 30 big tuskers remain in the whole of Africa out of a total elephant population now numbering fewer than 400,000.Eight of them are found in Tembe’s herd of just over 200 – a small but hugely significant herd. Johan Marais, a wildlife veterinarian internationally famous for his work with rhino and elephant, believes they are part of a unique and rare gene pool important for the fate of big tuskers. But the 30,000ha (74,000 acre) park has run out of space for its elephants. Since 2007, park managers have been forced to put all its females on contraception.While the killing of large numbers of elephants has a devastating impact on the animals’ social structures, early scientific research indicates that elephants without tusks can adapt quite successfully, National Geographic reports.But the film’s narrator, James Currie, a lifelong wildlife enthusiast and published author, argues that it has resulted in generations of handicapped animals.He is supported in these assertions by Marais, who notes that entire populations of African elephants are becoming completely tuskless as a consequence of losing big tuskers at their prime breeding age.“The future of these [elephants] depends on us contributing more land to grow the park and keep them healthy and moving freely. This is something we could all agree on as the people of Tembe,” says iNkosi Mabhudu Tembe. Photo courtesy Derek WhalleyThe good news, and part of the reason for the Oct. 8 screening, was the announcement of plans to expand the park and the official launch of the Tembe Tusker Foundation, which will drive the process.Established in the 1980s, the park is owned and managed by the Tembe people, a Tsonga tribe of about 500,000. Its safari lodge is popular with foreign tourists and entirely staffed by locals.The tribe’s leader and a foundation member, iNkosi (King) Mabhudu Tembe, told guests at the premiere that as much as 26,000 hectares (64,200 acres) could be added.“We have already identified some pockets of land adjacent to the park. On the eastern boundary there is potential to extend the park by about 15,000 hectares [37,100 acres] … And we also have potential in the southern boundary to do the expansion that could also be a total of 11,000 hectares [27,100 acres],” he said.“The future of these animals depends on us contributing more land to grow the park and keep them healthy and moving freely. This is something we could all agree on as the people of Tembe.”Elephants, which can be incredibly destructive, historically roamed vast areas, unhindered by borders or fences. Those at Tembe may have had a stomping ground that extended north to Delagoa Bay in modern Mozambique and to Lake St. Lucia on South Africa’s northeast coast.More space will mean the Tembe herd will be allowed to breed again.There have been only around five elephant poaching incidents in Tembe in the past 30 years. Photo courtesy Derek WhalleyA park enjoying community supportNic Vaughn-Jones, an adviser to the foundation, described Tembe as an unparalleled community conservation success story — a testimony to the pride the Tembe people take in preserving their natural heritage.In Tembe, he said, people had come to realize the importance of having wild animals on their ancestral lands and how conservation could improve their lives. Even as avid cattle owners, they took pride in Tembe’s status as home to the Big Five: leopard, lion, Cape buffalo, rhinoceros, and elephant. Over the last few years, the tribal authority has also actively and successfully campaigned for the introduction of wild dogs, a move unprecedented in the history of conservation in northern KwaZulu-Natal province.The park is now the region’s biggest private-sector employer and runs a number of projects that improve the lives of neighboring communities. These include free educational game drives for locals valued at more than 250,000 rand ($16,900) a year, ensuring the Tembe can experience their park firsthand and understand and treasure it.Thulani Thusi, who serves as the park’s community liaison officer, said the tribal leaders had been open in their dealings over the park and this was the main reason for the community’s support for its expansion.However, foundation members did not give specifics when asked from the floor about the exact size of the expansion and how it would be funded, except to say that a budget was “almost complete” and that the expansion project needed to ahead “ASAP.”Marais estimates that putting up an elephant fence at Tembe would cost nearly $8,000 a kilometer, about $5,000 per mile.He said they would target international and domestic funders to raise these funds.“There have been very good negotiations with a lot of the chiefs. They have said, ‘Listen, the land is here. The moment you have the money, we can go ahead,’” Marais said.He said money was also needed to rent the land from local communities and to build schools, clinics and put in boreholes — services that are few and far between in the area and would go a long way toward securing the continued support of locals.At this week’s premiere, homage was paid to a “true patriarch of Tembe”: the late Baba (father) Tom Mahamba, a respected ranger and the park’s long-serving hospitality manager, who features extensively in Last of the Big Tuskers.Mahamba, a favorite with visitors and a humble man with a real affection for the elephants he looked after, died in November 2017, before the documentary was complete.“Tom’s love and dedication to his job laid the foundation for what is now a place the community calls a home for elephants,” Thusi said.There is a moving scene where Mahamba visits the bones of an old friend, Tembe’s most famous big tusker, Isilo, Zulu for “king of kings.”The elephant was believed to have died of old age, but his tusks — estimated to have weighed 65 and 60 kilos (143 and 132 pounds) — were stolen before his carcass was found.There have been very few elephant poaching incidents in Tembe, said park spokesman Ernest Robertse — about five in more than 30 years.Elsewhere in Africa it’s a different story, and the documentary showed the scale of the problem facing rangers, including in some of Kenya’s best-loved parks.Marais said while “boots on the ground” (rangers) were needed to combat poaching, the assistance of people living in or near parks was more vital.“I don’t think everybody can benefit, but the communities around the park have to benefit. That’s a 100 percent surety,” he said.Vaughn-Jones agreed, citing the Tembe model as an antidote to the “old colonial way” of establishing parks, which excluded neighboring people.Currently, the safari lodge, referred by people in the community as “our hotel,” employs 55 people, nearly all from the local communities. They are provided with scholarships and professional training in hospitality or as guides; staff remuneration sees more than $260,000 a year flow into what was formerly one of the most impoverished areas in South Africa.Community levies collected at the park gate bring in $33,000 annually for community upliftment projects. A voluntary conservation levy brings in an additional $16,500 for conservation structures, and Tembe supports college scholarships valued at nearly $67,000 for students from the community.In addition to the planned expansion, the Tembe Tusker Foundation plans to approach the KwaZulu-Natal provincial government in the next few weeks to fund a new lodge. This might be along the lines of a commitment made by the Eastern Cape provincial government to back a new community-owned safari lodge at Addo Elephant National Park.Besides obvious benefits to wildlife tourism in the region, Marais sees the preservation of Tembe’s tuskers and moves to expand the park as important for the genetic strength of elephants at large and for broader conservation reasons.“Fifty, fifty-one years ago, there were 70,000 black rhino on the African continent. Now there are not more than 4,500 left,” he said.“In 1950 we had 4 million elephants recorded in Africa. Now, in 2019 we have not even 400,000 left.”He noted that entire populations of African elephant were also becoming completely tuskless as a consequence of losing big tuskers at their prime breeding age.Supporting the goals of the Tembe Tusker Foundation would help counter this, he added.Mlu Mdletshe is a Durban University of Technology journalism graduate enrolled in the Roving Reporters training program, Developing Environmental Watchdogs. Matthew Hattingh is Roving Reporters writing mentor.Banner image: Big tuskers in Tembe Elephant Park. Photo courtesy Monica Klopper Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by terna gyuse FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Covering environmental defenders can put journalists in dangerous situations (insider)

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Environmental defenders are increasingly under threat for protecting their lands against agribusiness, mining, illegal logging and other forms of development.Covering environmental defenders can put journalists in dangerous situations, but a sense of guilt at being able to safely leave can often follow journalists long after they have gone, and can be more psychologically difficult to deal with than the immediate danger.Learning how to acknowledge and deal with feelings of guilt is an important part of the job In April at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, I was listening to a panel where Sônia Guajajara, the general coordinator of the Articulação dos Povos Indígenas do Brasil (Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil), was speaking about the threats that indigenous people face — especially those fighting for their land in places like… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists. Environmental Journalism, first person accounts, Forests, Interviews With Environmental Journalists, Journalism, Media, Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

San Miguel seals its twin towers

first_imgJake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson View comments Archers destroy Tigers, near twice-to-beat bonus And while San Miguel got bigger, NLEX got the best small man in the 43-man pool as the Road Warriors made heady point guard Kiefer Ravena No. 2 overall, with Blackwater tabbing former Far Eastern U bruiser Raymar Jose at third, Phoenix Petroleum making Jason Perkins the fourth overall pick and Alaska getting the talented Jeron Teng at No. 5.Standhardinger is expected to join San Miguel early in the Commissioner’s Cup as he will have to play out a live contract with Hong Kong in the Asean Basketball League, and when he arrives, the Beermen can challenge the Gin Kings’ combo of 7-foot Greg Slaughter and 6-foot-9 Japeth Aguilar underneath.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogThere are no other teams which can talk of at least coming close as far as size is concerned.GlobalPort went with Fil-Am wingman Robbie Herndon at sixth, with Rey Nambatac, after being selected seventh, getting reunited with former Letran teammate Raymond Almazan and coach Caloy Garcia at Rain or Shine. LATEST STORIES MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Phoenix tapped hardworking forward Sidney Onwubere eighth overall with Star also adding some ceiling by picking Lervin Flores ninth.TNT KaTropa used the 10th and 11th picks to tab Cebuano guard Mac Tallo of SWU and Colegio de San Lorenzo slotman Jon Gabriel, respectively.Ginebra claimed UP slasher Jett Manuel as the 12th pick to round out the first round.NLEX continued to add youth to its frontline, tapping JRU forward Ervin Grospe to open the second round.Star picked slotman Joseph Gabayni next, Blackwater nabbed slasher Emil Palma, forward Julian Sargent went to Star, while Louie Vigil went to San Miguel.ADVERTISEMENT Davon Potts was selected by Alaska 18th overall, followed by Jom Sollano, who was tabbed by Rain or Shine.Gwynne Capacio (Star), Jayson Grimaldo (Phoenix), Monbert Arong (TNT), Wilson Baltazar (Phoenix), and Andreas Cahilig (GlobalPort) round out the second round picks.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Christian Standhardinger. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netChristian Standhardinger was selected first overall by San Miguel Beer as expected on Sunday afternoon, and after coming up short in completing the franchise’s second Triple Crown sweep in the recently concluded PBA Season, the Beermen have added a blue-chip material to make another go at it.The 6-foot-8 Fil-German joins the star-studded team and will form a lethal twin tower combine with reigning four-time MVP June Mar Fajardo as the Beermen added yet another piece in an effort to extend their dynasty while matching up with sister team and newly minted Governors’ Cup titlist Barangay Ginebra’s frontline.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Wanted bulletin issued for alleged fraudster

first_imgThe Guyana Police Force has issued a wanted bulletin for 43-year-old Allan Robert Gates also called Clive De Nobrega of Lot 440 Pineapple Street, East Ruimveldt. According to the Police, he is also a resident of Lot 8 St Ann’s Street, New Amsterdam, Berbice and Sandhill, Demerara River.He is wanted for questioning in connection to a fraudulent act, which was committed on Waheeda Ramcharran on February 2, 2018.According to the Police, in the past was placed before the court and slapped withWanted: Robert Gatesseveral fraud charges to which he served time for these offences.Gates was one of the persons who testified at the Walter Rodney Commission of Inquiry (CoI) claiming that the Guyana Police Force had collected intelligence leading up to the period of Dr Rodney’s death in 1980. During that time, the suspect was serving a 48-month sentence at the Georgetown Prison for the offence of false pretense.He testified that former Guyana Defence Force member William Gregory Smith was offered $1 million and a safe trip out of Guyana to kill the founder of the Working People’s Alliance, Dr Rodney.Gates’ testimony did not stop there when he also told the Commission that he was an undercover cop working for Rupert Roopnarine and had planted two listening devices, on his vehicle and another at the WPA office, which he claimed provided valuable information to the police.Police on Monday said that based on received Gates would have collected millions by falsely pretending that he was in a position to acquire motor vehicles for persons knowing same to be false.Anyone with information that may lead to the arrest of Gates is asked to contact the police on telephone numbers 226-1389, 227-2128, 911 or the nearest police station.last_img read more