Gabon pledges ‘massive’ protected network for oceans

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deep Sea, Dolphins, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Fish, Fishing, Gorillas, Government, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Marine Protected Areas, Megafauna, Oceans, Overfishing, Protected Areas, Sea Turtles, Turtles, United Nations, Whales, Wildlife center_img The network of marine protected areas covers some 53,000 square kilometers (20,463 square miles) of ocean, an area larger than Costa Rica.The marine parks and reserves could also draw tourists eager to catch a glimpse of the humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) and leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) that all shuttle through Gabonese waters.Government officials are in the process of overhauling how they manage fisheries, and they hope the move to protect Gabon’s territorial waters will improve the country’s food security and give its citizens a better chance to earn a living from fishing. Whales, dolphins, sea turtles and fish living off the coast of Gabon now enjoy similar protections to those designed to safeguard the Central African nation’s gorillas, elephants and other land-dwelling megafauna.On June 5 at the UN Ocean Conference in New York City, the country’s president, Ali Bongo Ondimba, said that Gabon is creating a set of 20 new protected areas in its territorial waters.An eel swims among sea anemones off the coast of Gabon. Photo by Enric Sala/National Geographic“President Bongo Ondimba once again has demonstrated his courage and his vision by translating our science and exploration work into policy,” said Michael Fay, a scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), in a statement by WCS. The network of marine protected areas including nine parks and 11 reserves covers some 53,000 square kilometers (20,463 square miles) of ocean, an area larger than Costa Rica.The announcement caps five years of research into Gabon’s marine ecosystems and meetings between environmental and fishing organizations. WCS says that the reserves will protect important habitats, from river deltas to depths down to 4 kilometers (2.5 miles). The marine parks and reserves could also draw tourists eager to catch a glimpse of the humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) and leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) that all shuttle through Gabonese waters.Fishing will also be allowed within parts of the network. Government officials are in the process of overhauling how they manage fisheries, and they hope the move will improve the country’s food security and give Gabon’s citizens a better chance to earn a living from fishing.Illegal fishing by vessels from non-African countries has increasingly become a problem for the continent’s coastal nations in recent decades.Scientists from around the globe applauded the decision to set aside the reserves along the 800-kilometer (497-mile) coast.A leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriace) nests on a beach in Gabon. Photo by A. Formia/Wildlife Conservation Society“The political will for achieving conservation and sustainable wildlife and fisheries management in Gabon is exemplary,” said Richard Ruggiero, who heads the Division of International Conservation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in the WCS statement. “This makes us optimistic for the survival of the many species that can be found in Gabon’s waters.”In fact, it was that array of life that convinced President Bongo to back a plan to protect Gabon’s slice of the Atlantic Ocean. In 2012 he visited a team of scientists who had just finished conducting research off the country’s coast for what was known as the “Pristine Seas” expedition. (The expedition was later featured in the film Wild Gabon.)“The richness we saw underwater in Gabon in 2012 gave us hope, and Gabon’s action shows tremendous leadership that we hope will resonate and be replicated across Africa’s coasts,” said National Geographic explorer-in-residence Enric Sala in the statement.Sala and Fay led the team, which also included representatives of the Gabonese National Parks Agency, and they shared their findings with Bongo.“[S]eeing the results of the Pristine Seas expedition made me realize that our marine ecosystems were as rich and as precious as our [better-known rainforests], and that we had to do for the oceans what my father … President Omar Bongo Ondimba did for the forests when he created 13 national parks in 2002,” Bongo said.A humpback whale breaching off the coast of Gabon. Photo and caption by T. Collins/Wildlife Conservation SocietyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

The Chinese town at the epicenter of the global illegal ivory trade

first_imgAccording to a report released yesterday by the London-based Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), Shuidong is “the world’s largest hub for ivory trafficking,” home to a network of criminal syndicates that have come to dominate the trade in illegal ivory poached from elephants in East and West Africa.One illegal ivory trafficker told EIA’s undercover investigators that he estimated as much as 80 percent of all poached ivory smuggled out of Africa and into China goes through Shuidong.The illegal trade in ivory is contributing to precipitous declines in African elephant populations. When China announced at the end of 2016 that it would close its domestic ivory market within a year, the news was hailed as a “game changer” for African elephants, whose numbers are being driven down across the continent by poachers eager to meet the demand for ivory.The Chinese government said it would rein in the smuggling and illegal sale of ivory through tougher law enforcement, among other measures — but those enforcement efforts do not appear to have reached the town of Shuidong in Guangdong Province.According to a report released yesterday by the London-based Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), Shuidong is “the world’s largest hub for ivory trafficking,” home to a network of criminal syndicates that have come to dominate the trade in illegal ivory poached from elephants in East and West Africa.“Since supplanting Chinese gangs from Fujian as the main raw ivory traffickers more than a decade ago, the Shuidong syndicates have remained untouched by any enforcement action in China or abroad,” EIA notes in the report.One of the illegal ivory traffickers told EIA’s undercover investigators that he estimated as much as 80 percent of all poached ivory smuggled out of Africa and into China goes through Shuidong.“The Chinese Government’s decision to shut its domestic ivory market by the end of 2017 is an admirable response to mounting international pressure to end the industrial-scale slaughter of Africa’s elephants,” Mary Rice, executive director of EIA, said in a statement accompanying the report. “What EIA discovered in Shuidong, however, clearly shows transnational criminal networks are operating with near-total impunity. It is vital that enforcement agencies in Africa and China put these criminals out of business immediately.”Tusk viewing in Shuidong, 2016. Photo © Environmental Investigation Agency.EIA’s investigators spent nearly three years following up on leads gathered in Tanzania that pointed to neighboring Mozambique as a country where elephant poachers and ivory smugglers are focusing their efforts. “The investigation in Mozambique revealed a Chinese-led criminal syndicate which for over two decades has been trafficking ivory from Africa to Shuidong, its hometown in southern China,” the report states. “According to this syndicate, it is just one of about 10 to 20 similar groups originating from Shuidong.”After learning of the Shuidong syndicates’ role in the illegal ivory trade, the undercover investigators spent over a year collecting information on the tactics used by the criminal gangs to manage their illicit business, from bribing customs and border enforcement officials to look the other way to hiding tusks in shipments of plastic pellets and concealing the origin of ivory shipments by routing them through transit countries like South Korea.The syndicates aren’t just staying ahead of law enforcement officials, however — they’re also adjusting their tactics on the fly as conditions on the ground and the demand for illegal animal products evolve.“By being flexible and adaptable, the Shuidong syndicate is relentless in its pursuit of profit from wildlife crime,” EIA reports. “With the profitability of tusks from East Africa falling, the Shuidong smugglers have moved into more profitable forest elephant ivory and pangolin scales. When enforcement improved in Tanzania, they shifted to neighbouring Mozambique. Their relentless criminal activities continue to be a major factor in the ongoing slaughter of elephants and other wildlife across Africa.”The illegal trade in ivory is contributing to precipitous declines in African elephant populations. A two-year survey by the Great Elephant Census found that 144,000 savanna elephants have been lost in Africa since 2007, which represents a decline of eight percent per year. And a 2013 study found that Africa’s forest elephant populations dropped by a staggering 60 percent over the previous decade.Elephant population line graph © Environmental Investigation Agency.Tanzania and Mozambique are both considered to be hotspots of elephant poaching. EIA cites data showing that the two countries are representative of the overall elephant population trends on the African continent: Tanzania lost 60 percent of its elephant population and Mozambique lost 53 percent between 2009 and 2014, according to the report.The authors of the EIA report recommend that the governments of Tanzania and Mozambique take steps to combat ivory trafficking at exit ports and share any information they might uncover through their own investigations with Chinese authorities. Recommendations for China include launching a multi-agency investigation to disrupt the networks involved in the illegal trade of animal parts; using a range of tax, anti-money laundering, anti-corruption, and organized crime laws to prosecute the criminal syndicates; and coordinating with source and transit countries to collect evidence of Chinese nationals working for the syndicates.“EIA has shared, in confidence, the detailed intelligence unearthed during the course of the Shuidong investigation with relevant Government departments and enforcement agencies and looks to them to use it,” Julian Newman, EIA’s campaigns director, said in a statement. “Action is needed to end this huge criminal enterprise which is devastating Africa’s elephant populations.”Orphaned elephant at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya. Photo by Rhett Butler. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Elephants, Environment, Illegal Trade, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Poaching, Wildlife center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

NOAA announces largest-ever Gulf of Mexico ‘dead zone’

first_imgAgriculture, Biofuels, Cattle, Corn, Dead Zone, Energy, Environment, Ethanol, Grasslands, Hypoxia, Industrial Agriculture, Livestock, Meat, Nutrient Pollution, Oceans, Pollution, Research, Soy Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The dead zone is primarily the result of nutrient pollution that stimulates massive blooms of algae. This algae is fed by nutrient runoff from agricultural areas in the U.S. Midwest carried down by the Mississippi River.An investigation found meat production largely to blame for this nutrient runoff.However, representatives with the meat industry say the report failed to consider the impact of ethanol production.NOAA scientists say the dead zone is likely to continue growing if nutrient levels aren’t reduced. Last week, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced the largest-ever recorded low-oxygen “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico. At 22,730 square kilometers (8,776 square miles) the area is the size of the U.S. state of New Jersey.The dead zone is primarily the result of nutrient pollution that stimulates massive blooms of algae. When this algae decomposes, oxygen levels drop below levels needed by many Gulf species to survive or develop normally; scientists refer to low-oxygen conditions as hypoxia.“The dead zone adversely affects organisms in a number of ways,” said Robert Magnien, director of NOAA’s Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research. “It reduces available habitat for fish and shrimp and reduces their food supply. Exposure to hypoxia can also directly reduce growth and reproduction.”At 22,730 square kilometers (8,776 square miles), this year’s dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest ever measured. Image courtesy of N. Rabalais, LSU/LUMCON.This can have knock-on effects for local economies if hypoxia kills off or changes commercially important populations.“The fear is that if the size of the dead zone remains at its current level or increases in the future, there will likely be further reductions in the abundance of key commercial and recreational species,” Magnien told Mongabay.A study by Duke University found shrimp grow more slowly in the dead zone. This led to a deficit in large shrimp, lower prices for small ones and consequential economic changes to the Gulf brown shrimp fishery.Midwest ag driving Gulf dead zoneNOAA scientists are pinning the blame for the increasing size of the dead zone – indeed, its existence at all – primarily on nutrients like nitrate that are washed off agricultural fields in the Mississippi watershed. The Mississippi River carries these nutrients as far as 2,000 miles before they’re released into the Gulf of Mexico.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) found about 1.15 million metric tons of nitrogen pollution was released into the Gulf of Mexico in 2016; preliminary data from May 2017 indicate pollution this year is set to eclipse that number, with levels well above the 1980-1996 baseline average.“We expected one of the largest zones ever recorded because the Mississippi River discharge levels, and the May data indicated a high delivery of nutrients during this critical month which stimulates the mid-summer dead zone,” said research professor Nancy Rabalais in a statement. Rabalais is a research professor at Louisiana State University (LSU) and Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, and led the survey mission that measured the extent of the dead zone.Scientists from Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium deploy a water sensor called a CTD sonde rosette to collect water samples to test for oxygen levels during the 2015 R/V Pelican’s shelf wide hypoxia cruise. Photo courtesy of LUMCONIn addition to creating and exacerbating the dead zone, nitrate runoff can contaminate drinking water. A 2015 Health Department report found agriculture-related nitrate pollution is a “growing chemical threat” to the drinking water of the U.S. state of Minnesota.Meat to blame?Much of this nitrate runoff comes from livestock manure and fertilizer applied to commodity crop fields – namely corn and soy. These crops are primarily grown to feed livestock for the U.S. meat industry, according to a new report by the NGO Might Earth that preceded the NOAA announcement.Mighty Earth investigated the supply chains of the country’s largest meat producers, mapping industry infrastructure and overlaying them with data on water nitrate concentrations linked to fertilizer pollution, as well as grassland clearance. They found meat-processing company Tyson Foods stood out from the rest.“Our analysis also found Tyson to be the dominant meat company in all the regions suffering the worst environmental impacts from industrial meat and feed production – from grassland clearing in Nebraska, Iowa, and Kansas, to manure and fertilizer pollution pouring into waterways from the Heartland down to the Gulf states,” the report reads.Grain traders Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Cargill and Bunge provide corn and soy livestock feed to Tyson. Mighty Earth’s investigation found Cargill and ADM dominate the corn and soy market in states with the highest grassland losses.“The expansion of new fields in these areas is likely contributing to what is projected to be the biggest Dead Zone ever this year,” the report states.Cattle graze in Minnesota, one of the U.S. states through with the Mississippi River runs. Photo from the public domain.Cargill and Bunge did not respond to requests for comment by press time. ADM pointed to their sustainability initiatives.“ADM creates long-term value by providing innovative, responsibly-sourced ingredients for a growing population,” ADM spokesperson Jackie Anderson said in an email. “In the U.S., we are members of Field to Market, a supply chain sustainability program in which growers, commodity traders, and food manufacturing companies work together to improve the sustainability of crops and share aggregated environmental data. In addition, ADM has an Environmental Policy which governs the operation of our facilities, requiring compliance with environmental permits, including water discharge permits.”Tyson is one of the world’s largest food companies. In its report, Mighty Earth contends that Tyson is driving the demand for feed “without applying any known sustainability screen to its purchases.”“The company’s market dominance means that it has standardized many of the practices and market incentives contaminating our water and destroying our landscape today,” the report states. “But it also means that Tyson has the ability to lead the transformation of America’s agriculture industry to end these harmful practices.”EthanolTyson and others in the industry refute Mighty Earth’s findings, saying ethanol production is a big driver of U.S. industrial corn cultivation and is largely ignored in the report.“We don’t agree with this group’s characterization of our company but share its interest in protecting the environment,” a Tyson company representative said in an email. “That’s why we publicly disclose our environmental efforts and recently announced that we’re collaborating with the World Resources Institute to develop goals for improving our environmental footprint.  We also plan to announce our collaboration with other third-party organizations that will work with us to set additional science-based targets.”Tyson contends the thousands of independent farmers with whom it works have formal nutrient management plans in place, and says Mighty Earth’s report fails to consider ethanol production as a major driver of commodity agriculture.“It’s true the livestock and poultry industry is a major buyer of grain for feed, however, the report fails to note that a large percentage of corn raised in the U.S. is used for biofuel and that a significant portion is used for human consumption,” the representative said. (Read Tyson’s full statement here.)Fertilizer is applied to a corn field in Iowa. Photo from the public domain.In its report Mighty Earth argues the meat market is the largest single market for corn and soybeans, pointing to USDA numbers pegging 70 percent of U.S.-grown soybeans are used for animal feed. It also draws on research that found around a third of the corn used for ethanol production is subsequently sold as livestock feed.“As the report notes, the meat industry uses 40% of the annual corn crop and over 70% of the soy crop. Biofuels uses about 30% of the annual corn crop,” Mighty Earth campaign director Lucia von Reusner told Mongabay. “The report looked at the intersection of meat producers’ infrastructure and row cropping because this nexus has never been examined, and because we know that animal feed operations rely heavily on the feed crops grown nearby. That’s why the report mapped that overlay.“Much has been written about the social and ecological perils of growing corn for biofuels. This report did not focus on biofuels policy for a practical reason as well: federal policy is the primary driver for that industry, and is highly unlikely to change in the near term. In contrast, meat producers are the largest demand source for both corn and soy, and, if they took action today to support more sustainable farming practices, that market signal would rapidly transform US farming practices and thus water quality as well.“Tyson and other Big Meat companies have a responsibility to drive change for the massive share of corn and soy they buy. Once they do, those best practices will be taken up by farmers everywhere, including those growing corn for biofuels. That will benefit farmers, consumers, and the drinking water and fisheries on which we all depend.”The race to reduceRegardless of whether meat or ethanol production is leaching more nitrate into the Mississippi watershed, the data are clear: nutrient pollution is creating a big problem in the Gulf of Mexico. And scientists worry it is getting even bigger.“Our models show a strong correlation between the size of the dead zone and the amount of nutrient pollution entering the Gulf of Mexico during the spring,” said NOAA’s Robert Magnien “With expected increases in runoff-producing storms and increasing temperatures in the future, the size of the dead zone may well increase even if current practices remain the same.”A number of initiatives are working to limit the growth of the dead zone, such as the interagency Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Task Force (HTF). A consortium of federal, state, and tribal members, the goal of the HTF is to shrink the dead zone through state and federal nutrient reduction strategies.But industry participation is also crucial, according to Magnien.“The raising of animals, along with many other human activities that produce nutrient pollution, contribute to dead zone formation,” Magnien said. “Reduction of nutrient pollution requires a multi-sector management strategy. The cooperation of industries and municipalities to significantly reduce nutrient runoff from land and wastewater will be needed not only for restoration of impacted areas of the Gulf, but also to protect drinking water supplies and freshwater lakes and reservoir in the watershed.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Taking on the plastic straw: Q&A with Adrian Grenier, actor and UN Environment Goodwill Ambassador

first_imgUna publicación compartida de Zaria Forman (@zarialynn) el 19 de Ago de 2017 a la(s) 6:55 PDT Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Artist Zaria Forman’s Instagram post accepting the challenge and challenging NatGeo Photographer Cory Richards.Mongabay: We cover ocean issues regularly at Mongabay. Which marine topics do you think are the most underreported?Adrian Grenier: Plastic pollution has earned a place in the spotlight the last few months but it’s still critical to continue to educate more people to [make a] measurable impact. Illegal and overfishing is another big problem. Again, as consumers we have incredible power over this problem: we can refuse seafood that has been illegally caught or fished from a stock that is unsustainable. It starts with education, awareness, and holding one another accountable.Mongabay: What are your goals as a newly appointed U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) Goodwill Ambassador?Adrian Grenier: I am committed to working across the public and private sectors to facilitate measurable global impact that shifts our culture from one of conspicuous consumption to conscious sustainability. This past February I helped UNEP launch their Clean Seas campaign, which inspires individuals, organizations, and government actors to come together and collaborate on radical solutions. You will see much more of this radical collaboration throughout my work with the U.N.Adrian Grenier, actor and environmental activist. Photo courtesy of Adrian Grenier.Editor’s note: This interview has been lightly edited for clarity and length. Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Once known as “Vince” on HBO’s Entourage, Adrian Grenier is deeply concerned about the health of our oceans.He co-founded the Lonely Whale Foundation in 2015.The #stopsucking challenge aims to fight plastic pollution in oceans by decreasing everyday use of plastic straws. Sometimes humans invent things, seemingly benign things, that end up having profound and unpredictable effects. The invention of plastic must have been a marvel in the early 20th century. Entrepreneurs scrambled to build new things and innovate on the old, new technologies developed, and everyday life quickly underwent a huge shift.Plastic is now, quite literally, everywhere. It’s on land and in the oceans (even inside the fish inside the oceans). Scientists are regularly documenting unforeseen side effects, great and small, of our reliance on plastic, like how plastic microbeads from our toothpaste and face wash are decreasing sperm counts in oysters.Plastic pollution is yet another unintended consequence of human invention and innovation. The impacts on our natural environment are profound, but will we have the plasticity to shift away from our reliance on this synthetic material?Adrian Grenier, main act in HBO’s Entourage, founded the Lonely Whale Foundation in 2015 to promote education and awareness on ocean conservation issues. These days he is focusing his energies on what he considers to be one of the “suckiest” parts of plastic pollution — straws.Coral landscape in Komodo, Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.AN INTERVIEW WITH ADRIAN GRENIERMongabay: Who or what inspired you to get involved in conservation?Adrian Grenier: I was lucky enough to be raised by a mother who cared deeply for our Earth and all of its creatures. From a very young age she taught me the importance of caring for our shared environment, starting with cleaning my room. Now, my room is the world and I intend to fulfill my responsibility to keep it clean and also inspire others to do the same.Mongabay: What environmental issue is most important to you right now? Why did you co-found the Lonely Whale Foundation? Adrian Grenier: In the last few years the ocean has been my main area of focus. When I was younger, I fought for every issue, animal, habitat… you name it! But I realized that our ocean is so vastly underserved yet it is the heart of our blue planet. That is why I co-founded Lonely Whale Foundation with my producing partner Lucy Sumner, to reconnect all people to our ocean through inspiration and tangible action. No matter if you live on the beach or in a landlocked town, we are all capable of becoming ocean advocates.Mongabay: Tell us about the Strawless Ocean initiative. What’s the problem with plastic straws and why do we all need to #stopsucking?Adrian Grenier: Single-use plastic straws are our “gateway plastic” into the plastic pollution conversation. Many of us have no need for single-use plastic straws, and what’s worse is that many are not recyclable. We use 500 million plastic straws every day just in the U.S. and scientists have projected that by 2050 there may be more plastic in our ocean than fish. Those are two pretty overwhelming statistics. For many, it can be an insurmountable task to begin to tackle this problem. That’s why Lonely Whale has teamed up with 40-plus NGO partners to form the Strawless Ocean initiative. Together, we are addressing plastic pollution by starting with one item: the straw. Because if it’s just one thing we can all #stopsucking, right?!Mongabay: Does the effort aim to ban the use of plastic straws? How will we keep ice cubes from bumping our noses annoyingly? Adrian Grenier: Our primary goal is to provide alternative options, either marine degradable (paper) or re-usable (metal or glass). If we can begin to understand the impact of our daily habits through an alternative straw, we view that as a key metric of success. For example, in our Strawless In Seattle campaign our 200+ partners have opted to use paper straws to champion the cause. In addition to presenting individuals and businesses an alternative, it is really important to know that for some in the disability community plastic straws are necessary. For that reason we’re working with key partners in the Strawless Ocean initiative to ensure that new legislation regarding sale or use of plastic straws appropriately recognizes their needs.I pledge to #stopsucking! @LeoDiCaprio, will you join me? https://t.co/uux7o9ODPW— Sylvia A. Earle (@SylviaEarle) August 10, 2017Oceanographer Sylvia A. Earle’s tweet accepting the challenge and pledging to #stopsucking. Celebrities, Conservation, conservation players, Environment, Environmental Activism, Fish, Interviews, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution last_img read more

How to make sure your aquarium fish are ethical (commentary)

first_imgFishkeeping has been around for centuries, and the amount of people who want to start keeping fish grows year after year. However, many newcomers to the hobby don’t carry out research to ensure the fish they’re buying have been sourced ethically.The disturbing truth is that a large portion of marine fish are not raised or caught ethically. Some are wild-caught, meaning they’ve been taken from their natural environment to be sold onto aquarists. However, not all collection of fish in the wild is unethical — it depends of how they were caught, whether that species is in decline, and a few other factors.In this commentary piece for Mongabay, Robert Woods, fish enthusiast and owner of Fishkeeping World, explains how to ensure that you buy aquarium fish ethically.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Fishkeeping has been around for centuries, and the amount of people who want to start keeping fish grows year after year. However, many newcomers to the hobby don’t carry out research to ensure the fish they’re buying have been sourced ethically. Instead, many people just turn up at the local pet store and buy the most colorful fish they can find without a second thought, usually based on the price tag.The disturbing truth is that a large portion of marine fish are not raised or caught ethically. Some are wild-caught, meaning they’ve been taken from their natural environment to be sold onto aquarists. However, not all collection of fish in the wild is unethical — it depends of how they were caught, whether that species is in decline, and a few other factors.Here’s how to ensure that you buy aquarium fish ethically.The debate around wild-caught vs captive-bred fishUp to 90% of freshwater species in aquariums are bred in captivity. The beauty behind this is that they are already used to tank conditions and don’t need an acclimation period, we don’t deplete numbers in the wild, and we can preserve species that might be going extinct or that wouldn’t survive in the wild (for example, albino species).Most people accept that captive-bred fish are much more ethical than sourcing wild-caught fish. This might lead you to assume that all wild-caught fish automatically equal unethically sourced fish, but this isn’t necessarily the case. There are many wild fish whose populations are abundant in rainforests and flood plains.Many wild-caught fish are caught in areas where the water levels fluctuate according to seasons, like killifish, and once the water dries up they will inevitably die. Collecting these excess fish gives local people a source of income, so long as their natural habitats are protected and not destroyed.There is, however, a darker side to wild-caught fish. Some fish are caught using chemicals. While this practice is more common in the food trade, it does still occur in this industry and is a worry. Cyanide is a chemical that stuns fish and makes them easier to catch.Not only does it stun fish that fishermen are trying to catch, but it also kills a large proportion of surrounding fish and damages coral reefs. Fishing with cyanide is mostly banned worldwide, but laws are not strictly enforced, so it’s easy for fishermen to get around this, unfortunately.You can therefore see how important it is to ask, when you buy wild-caught fish, not only how they have been caught but also where they have come from and what methods were used to catch them.If the pet shop isn’t sure or won’t offer you any insight into this question, avoid them and find a more reputable place to source your fish. Small independent fish stores should know exactly where their fish are coming from and often tend to care much more about the animals’ welfare than major chain brands.A yellow tang in an aquarium. Photo Credit: Robert Woods.Endangered speciesThis is a really simple point to stick by: If a species is endangered, don’t buy one for your aquarium. While there are some people who will buy endangered fish to try and keep the population going, with the intention to release them, the EU found that this is not helpful because the captive-bred fish have a limited gene pool, altered behavioral patterns, and are typically more aggressive.Sourcing marine fishIf you want to keep a marine tank, one of the main problems you’re likely to come up against is how to purchase and source your fish ethically. Unlike freshwater species, the vast majority of marine fish have not yet been bred in captivity. Only 330 species of saltwater fish have been bred successfully in captivity.Many saltwater fish are wholly unsuitable for aquarium life: they require such specific conditions and feeding regimens that they simply don’t survive in the aquarium.The best way to support the practice and show your solidarity against unethical practices such as cyanide poisoning is to not keep marine fish. Instead, choose a freshwater tropical tank. If you’re set on keeping a marine tank, only source fish that can either be bred in captivity or you’re certain have been sourced responsibly and are not endangered.Ensuring your fish’s tank matches the natural environmentOnce you’ve bought a group of fish and you’re sure you’ve done all you can to make sure they have been ethically bred or sourced responsibly, the ethics debate doesn’t end there. You will then be responsible for ensuring that your fish live a happy life in a tank that is large enough for them, is regularly maintained, and matches their natural habitat as closely as possible.Many people will just assume they only need to find out the correct tank size for their fish, and the rest can be set up however they like, just as long as it’s nice to look at. This is simply untrue. Ensuring your fishes’ tank conditions replicate the natural habitat your fish prefer is essential to their health and wellbeing.Some species need plenty of plants, rockery, and driftwood, especially if they are quite a timid species. If you don’t provide this, they will live in a state of constant stress, which is not an ethical way of keeping fish at all.Other species require really fine sand like substrate if they have long fins that can easily be damaged, or barbels which they use to sift through the sand and look for food. Again, if you simply just set up your tank based on the color gravel you like, and add one of these fish, they will not be happy for long.Be informedIf you only take away one piece of information from this article, it would be to make sure you are informed. You can never ask too many questions. Knowledge is power and you should check on a case-by-case basis each time you buy a fish or group of fish, whether they are captive-bred or wild-caught, and if it’s the latter, how and from where they were caught. Be willing to pay slightly more money for fish that you know have been farmed or caught sustainably and ethically.Infographic courtesy of Fishkeeping World.A tank with neon tetras and guppies. Photo Credit: Robert Woods.Robert Woods is a fish enthusiast and owner of Fishkeeping World.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Aquarium Fish, Aquariums, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Ethics, Fish, Researcher Perspective Series center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Top court holds Indonesian government liable over 2015 forest fires

first_imgIndonesia’s Supreme Court has ordered that the government carry out measures to mitigate forest fires in the country, following a citizen lawsuit filed in the wake of devastating blazes in 2015.The decision upholds earlier rulings by lower courts, but the government says it will still challenge it, claiming that the circumstances that led to the 2015 fires were due to mismanagement by previous administrations.The plaintiffs in the lawsuit say they just want the government to implement common-sense measures to prevent the fires from recurring, and which existing laws already require it to carry out.The fire season is already underway again this year, as companies and smallholder farmers set forests ablaze in preparation for planting. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s highest court has upheld a ruling holding the government, including the president, liable for the disastrous forest fires and resultant haze that blanketed large swaths of the country in 2015.The court ruled that the government must accommodate the demands of the plaintiffs, a coalition of citizens and environmental activists, for more stringent measures to address the annual fire problem. It said the government had failed in its responsibility to mitigate disasters, in this case forest fires, thereby allowing the problem to recur every year.“In our legal consideration, disaster mitigation within a country, including Indonesia, is the responsibility of the government,” court spokesman Andi Samsan Ngaro told local media, quoting part of the ruling.The original lawsuit was filed in 2016 in a court in the Bornean province of Central Kalimantan, one of the regions hardest hit by the fires and haze the previous year. The fires, most of them set to clear land for planting, razed 260,000 square kilometers (100,386 square miles) of land across the country, much of it carbon-rich peat forests, and sent clouds of choking haze billowing across large parts of Indonesia and neighboring Singapore and Malaysia.During the height of the fires, daily carbon dioxide emissions from the burning alone exceeded emissions from all economic activity in the United States. The World Bank estimated that the fires that year cost Indonesia $16 billion in losses just from the disruption to economic activity.Firefighters extinguish fires in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Image by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay Indonesia.Survivors’ lawsuitArie Rompas, a Greenpeace Indonesia forest campaigner and one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, welcomed the decision by the Supreme Court, which upholds the earlier rulings of two lower courts in Palangka Raya, the Central Kalimantan capital.He said the lawsuit was born out of the frustration that he and fellow residents of Palangka Raya felt about the 2015 fires and the government’s seeming inability to get the problem under control.“We are survivors but we also had to evacuate victims who were vulnerable and help provide others with medication, because the government wasn’t there [to help us] at that time,” he told local media. “We also had to save our families to evacuate them from a very difficult situation at that time. Therefore, one of the options that we took was to bring those responsible for this situation to the court.”Mariaty A. Nun, another plaintiff and resident of Palangka Raya, said she hoped the ruling would spell the end of forest fires in the province.“The annual forest fires and haze have violated the most basic rights of citizens, which is the right to breathe,” she said. “Therefore, with this verdict being legally binding, we hope the government makes sure there’s no repeat of forest fires and haze and to make sure that the cost for medical treatment isn’t borne by the victims.”But the ruling comes just as this year’s fire season gets into full swing, with hotspots reported across Central Kalimantan and haze once again shrouding Palangka Raya.According to an analysis by Greenpeace, there’s a 52 percent increase in the number of fire hotspots in Kalimantan from the period January – June this year, compared to the same period last year.Greenpeace analysis also shows that, so far this July, Central Kalimantan is once again among the provinces with the highest numbers of fires hotspots, with 152 hotspots detected.“Many [residents] are suffering from lung diseases,” Dimas Hartono, the head of the provincial chapter of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi) Central Kalimantan told local media. “They’ve even had to leave their villages.”Now, as in 2015, the government has instructed children to wear masks and stay indoors after school to reduce their exposure to the haze.Arie said other, more urgent, actions were needed, including cracking down on those found to be setting fires, naming and shaming the companies on whose lands the fires were burning, and providing adequate shelters for residents forced to evacuate from their homes.“The land and forest fires, including in Central Kalimantan, still happen,” he said. “They have appeared again and continue to be a threat.”Children in villages near Palangka Raya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, wearing masks during a haze episode. Image by Lina A. Karolina.Not backing downThe government has now lost the lawsuit three times — at the Palangka Raya administrative court; an appeal to the Palangka Raya high court; and now at the Supreme Court — but still hasn’t given up.Instead, it plans to file a case review, a final avenue of legal recourse that’s permitted if there’s new evidence or circumstances.Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar said that while the government respected the Supreme Court’s ruling, it intended to challenge it in light of the various policies adopted since the 2015 fire episode to address the problem. She blamed the 2015 fires on decades of mismanagement of the country’s forestry and agriculture sector, saying the problem was something that President Joko Widodo had inherited when he took office in 2014.“Because [we] had just come into office [when the fires started in 2015], of course we all had to study the causes first. What’s wrong and where were the mistakes? It turned out that there were many past mistakes and [the president] actually fixed those mistakes,” Siti said in a statement.“There were companies clearing land with contractors by ordering locals to burn, and then they ran away,” she added. “This happened and kept happening. In the past, law enforcement was very weak and land management was all over the place. There were big companies that didn’t have fire-extinguishing equipment.”Since then, she said, the government has overhauled the way it addresses forest fires, adopting an approach that prioritizes prevention over reaction. This includes an ambitious initiative, launched in 2016, to restore degraded peatlands across the country to make them less prone to catching fire. (A study earlier this year found the program to be severely underfunded with respect to its massive scope.)The government also ramped up law enforcement efforts against companies found to have fires on their concessions. To date, courts have ordered these companies pay a combined 18 trillion rupiah ($1.3 billion), but none have paid up.Siti said these policies had led to a decline in the number of hotspots and area of land burned since 2015. “Indonesia, which used to be known for its peat that’s repeatedly burned, is now becoming a reference for other countries to learn,” she said.Activists and researchers, though, attribute the drop in the number and extent of fires to milder weather in the intervening years, saying the government lucked out after a particularly harsh dry season in 2015 fueled by an El Niño weather system.Indonesian President Joko Widodo speaks in front of the media accompanied by Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar on his left. Photo courtesy of the Indonesian government.Holding government to accountRegardless of whether it pursues a case review, the government should still focus on implementing the Supreme Court’s ruling as part of long-term mitigation measures, says Arie of Greenpeace Indonesia.“It’ll have a more positive benefit than taking another legal attempt, such as a case review,” he said. “If the case review [proceeds], what else does [the government] want to show as new evidence?”Safrudin Mahendra, the executive director of the environmental NGO Save Our Borneo (SOB), said citizens shouldn’t be compelled to sue the government just to get it to provide common-sense services for the good of the public.“All of the demands in the lawsuit aren’t things that will harm the government,” he said. “They’re actually aimed at improving the management of the forests.”Safrudin also pointed out that the plaintiffs’ demands were for measures already mandated by existing laws, which the government is obliged to undertake anyway, such as providing shelter for victims of fire and haze and disclosing the names of companies whose concessions are burning.“If the government meets these demands, then its reputation will improve in the eyes of the public,” he said.Henri Subagiyo, the executive director of the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), agreed, saying the plaintiffs weren’t asking for “anything outrageous.”“They’re asking for regulations that should have been issued based on the law itself,” he said.He added the court’s ruling could form the basis for the government to boost its policies in combating forest fires.“With this ruling, the government needs to see again which efforts needed to be strengthened, such as speeding up the issuance of regulations as demanded by the citizens,” he said.Another key thing that the government could improve upon is the lack of transparency in the country’s plantation industry, fueled by the government’s dogged reluctance to share information on palm oil concessions to the public.More than two years ago, Indonesia’s highest court ruled that the government should make information on palm oil concessions available to the public.However, ministers in the President’s administration continue to defy this decision and have recently explicitly ordered palm oil companies not to share information regarding the plantation concessions they own, citing national security, privacy and competition reasons.Activists argue that the release of such data would make it significantly easier to identify who controls land where forest fires continue to occur.“By fighting this verdict, Jokowi [Joko Widodo’s popular nickname] is aligning with plantation companies’ interests and putting their profits above the health and environment of Indonesia,” Arie said.Nur Hidayati, the executive director of Walhi, said accepting the court’s ruling would show the government’s seriousness in improving the situation.“If President Jokowi is serious about correcting the wrongdoing of 2015 and is ready to fix forest governance, he must accept this landmark decision,” she said. “Recognizing past negligence is the only way forward to protect citizens’ health and future.”Banner image: A peat swamp in Sumatra smolders during the 2015 haze crisis. The drainage canals were dug in order to prepare the land for planting with oil palm, but the practice renders the land vulnerable to catching fire. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Governance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Haze, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests Article published by Hans Nicholas Jongcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Complicating the narrative about indigenous communities and their struggles (insider)

first_imgArticle published by Willie Shubert Amazon Rainforest, Culture, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Insider, Oil Often in articles about indigenous struggles or resistance, there is a need to write about communities as being victims of the extractive sector, or warriors fighting to defend their territory. I’ve been writing about indigenous resistance in Ecuador for about three years, and I’ve often fallen into the same dynamic.In my case, I seek out the warriors. But what if the news media allowed indigenous people to be whole and multifaceted?This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. Don Lizardo was sitting in his hammock, rocking gently back and forth, as he told us heartbreaking stories about working in haciendas when he was younger. We were sitting in his living room, in the house that he built with his own hands, in the indigenous Kichwa community of Llanchama in the middle of Ecuador’s… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New lease on life beckons for Arroceros, Manila’s hidden jungle

first_imgConservation, Endangered, Forests, Governance, Urban Planning Arroceros Forest Park in the heart of Manila is one of the few green spaces left in the bustling Philippines capital.Successive governments have tried to get rid of it for new developments, but the city’s newly elected mayor has announced plans to retain and rehabilitate it as part of his “green city” proposal.The park is home to more than 3,000 trees, including 60 native species, and serves as a rest stop for migratory birds.Often dubbed the “lung” of Manila, Arroceros has been shown to mitigate the city’s notorious air pollution, and plays a key role in minimizing flooding, another of the capital’s litany of problems. MANILA — It’s said that when the mayor of the Philippine capital Manila looks out the window of his office, he often sees four things: the murky yet thriving Pasig River; the dilapidated Metropolitan theater, famed for its art deco furnishings; the busy train terminal; and the only patch of green in the gray and grime of the city: Arroceros Forest Park, a 2.2-hectare (5.4-acre) mini jungle that’s home to centuries-old trees and a favorite resting place for migrating birds.Yet despite the respite the park offers its avian and human visitors, Manila’s mayors have persistently insisted on getting rid of it. Lito Atienza, who served as mayor from 1998 to 2007, allowed a portion of the park to be bulldozed for a new government building, while Joseph “Erap” Estrada, a former president and mayor from 2013 until earlier this year, wanted to turn the park into a school gymnasium.But when Estrada’s deputy, Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso, won the race to succeed him last May, environmental advocates found reason to breathe a sigh of relief. Moreno announced in July that he would keep the park, considered Manila’s last lungs, intact, and even rehabilitate it as part of his “green city” proposal.Arroceros is home to more than 3,000 trees, with around 60 native species present,  accounting for 17 percent of all mature trees in the city. The species there include narra (Pterocarpus indicus), the country’s national tree, as well as endangered species like molave (Vitex parviflora), ipil (Intsia bijuga) and supa (Sindora supa).There’s no other urban jungle in Metro Manila like Arroceros, says Menie Odulio, president of the Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society Inc. “The closest could be the La Mesa Eco Park, which is a watershed. Quezon City Memorial Park is quite similar, though it doesn’t have that many trees as compared to Arroceros,” she tells Mongabay. (Both La Mesa Eco Park and Quezon City Memorial Park are located in Quezon City. Manila City and Quezon City are part of the National Capital Region or Metro Manila, the nation’s capital.)Of the 21 urban green spaces in Manila, Arroceros is the only one that has no historical landmark or monuments defined by the National Cultural Heritage Act, making it vulnerable to development programs. Yet, in a study on Manila’s urban green spaces conducted in 2016, Arroceros was found to have the highest proportion of crown canopy cover among the other parks in Manila’s fifth electoral district. It also has one of the highest rates of vegetation, one of the parameters of resiliency that “improves infiltration, reduces surface run off, prevents siltation and ultimately, reduce exposure to flooding,” the study says.Its importance, however, lies not just in the native tree species within its enclosed canopy but its contribution to urban biodiversity.Manila Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso’s “green city” proposal includes rehabilitating Arroceros Forest Park and expanding its coverage area. Image by Manila Public Information OfficeA shield against flooding and other climate change impactsAs the largest city and the capital of the Philippines, Manila plays a major role in national development. Yet it suffers from the myriad urban problems that plague a city of its size, including massive flooding.“Species diversity in an urban green space influences capacity of an urban human settlement to withstand extreme weather events such as flooding,” the study says. A deeper look at the hazard map of Manila shows that District 5, where Arroceros and the other parks are located, is one of the areas least susceptible to urban flooding.Arroceros’s high coverage of crown canopy also helps in regulating the city’s temperatures, which can sometimes reach as high as 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit). “You can really feel the difference once you’re inside. It’s way cooler in the park,” Odulio says.Another study confirms that Arroceros helps mitigate air pollution levels in Manila. The study highlights the findings of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2016 that Manila’s pollution index where the park is located ranges from moderate to unhealthy.“Arroceros Forest Park … can remove 30 tons of particulates per year. [It] provides a ‘Lung’ for the city. The carbon dioxide emitted from the city (from vehicles, factories, air conditions, etc.) is absorbed by the trees which reduces carbon dioxide and give out fresh oxygen,” the study says.Beyond its environmental and historical importance, Arroceros also provides a service to the physical and mental well-being of the city’s residents by “bringing them closer to nature,” the study says. Odulio says that Manila Doctors Hospital occasionally brings some of its patients to the park as part of their therapy, in the belief that the environment in Arroceros facilitates the healing process.Manila’s flood hazard map showing areas that are prone to flooding. Arroceros Forest Park, located in District 5 (Intramuros) has 21 urban green spaces and is one of the few areas with low flood susceptibility. Image from Leonora Gonzalez and Dina Magnaye’s study“There’s what we call forest bathing, a form of nature therapy. It helps us physically if we have direct interaction with nature. They say it’s supposed to be scientific, something to do with improving hormonal balance in the body,” she says.Beyond being a mere forest park, Arroceros is a “living laboratory,” Odulio says. After all, the development of the forest park was initiated in 1993 “strictly for educational purposes.”“It’s a learning experience to visit Arroceros. At least, we have an area where people can go and feel how it is to be surrounded by trees. If you bring there adults and kids who live in Manila, at least they’ll get to experience nature first-hand,” Odulio says.Threatened by invasive tree speciesArroceros Forest Park is the product of a planned development that started after the local government purchased the land in 1992. Back then, the area only had 150 trees. A memorandum of agreement signed in 1993 between the Manila city government and the Winner Foundation, which manages the park to this day, led to the development of the area as a forest park.Chiqui Mabanta, the president of the Winner Foundation, says they proposed a 15-year development plan. “Fifteen years is considered enough period to develop a forest park. The idea is that we will develop Arroceros into a forest park, then we will return it to the city,” she says.The foundation obtained some 3,500 saplings from the Manila Seedling Bank and planted them throughout the park. In the initial stages, invasive tree species such as mahogany made their way in the park and pushed back native tree species.“Mahogany has to do with affecting the acidity of the soil, thereby affecting the growth of other plants,” Arroceros caretaker Antonio Magno says.Odulio says that was one of the lessons learned in developing the forest park. “At first, people just planted any type of trees since they all provide oxygen and shade, and help in the absorption of floodwater. But after many years, we saw that some trees are not good for local trees. We realized that what we should be planting are only those endemic in the Philippines,” she says.Since then, the goal of the foundation has been to grow native tree species, especially the endangered ones. “Little by little, the plan is to get rid of [the invasive plants]. It hasn’t started, but with the new plan [by Mayor Domagoso], it will happen,” Odulio says.Arroceros Forest Park, Manila’s urban jungle, has critically-endangered tree species and is a pit stop for migrating birds. Image by Reynaldo Santos JrBiodiversity and historyThe lush trees of Arroceros have attracted local and migratory birds such as the yellow-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier), pied fantail (Rhipidura nigritorquis), arctic warbler (Phylloscopus borealis), brown shrike (Lanius cristatus), white-collared kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris), common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis), rufous night heron (Nycticorax caledonicus), glossy starling (Lamprotorniss pp.) and black-naped oriole (Oriolus chinensis).“From our perspective, the value of Arroceros is very important because it showcases biodiversity,” Mabanta says.But apart from its rich flora and fauna, the land where the park exists also holds important historical value. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the site was part of a long stretch of land along the Pasig River called the Parian de Arroceros, which served as a marketplace and trading post for Chinese merchants. Among the commodities traded back then was rice, hence the term Arroceros, which means “rice cultivators” in Spanish.Proof of this historic trading activity was found during an excavation in the southern part of the forest park in 2005. The National Museum discovered archaeological materials such as fragments of stoneware jars, blue-and-white Chinese porcelain shreds, fragments of European ceramics, and even old coins.The area was also the site of the historic Fabrica de Cigarillos, a tobacco factory in the 19th century, which was mentioned in national hero José Rizal’s novel Noli Me Tangere. In the novel, lead character Crisostomo Ibarra is described as having smelled the scent of tobacco coming from a factory in Arroceros. During the U.S. occupation, the area was the site of a military garrison, and after World War II, home to the office of the Department of Education, Culture, and Sports (DECS).Citations:Gonzales, L. P., & Magnaye, D. C. (2017). Measuring the urban biodiversity of green spaces in a highly urbanizing environment and its implications for human settlement resiliency planning: The case of Manila City, Philippines. Procedia Environmental Sciences, 37, 83-100. doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2017.03.024Ancheta, A. A., Membrebe Jr., Z. O., Santos, A. J. G., Valeroso, J. C. C., & Batac, C. V. (2016). Sustainability of forest park as space break: A case study of Arroceros Forest Park in congested city of Manila. OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development, 9(5), 63-82.Banner image of Arroceros Forest Park, which boasts the highest crown canopy cover among the 21 urban parks in the fifth district of Manila City. Image by Reynaldo Santos JrFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by leilanicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Japan ‘devastated’ as it fails again to go past World Cup’s last 16

first_imgA Japan supporters cries after losing the round of 16 match between Belgium and Japan at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Rostov Arena, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, Monday, July 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia – Japan came so close to reaching the World Cup quarterfinals for the first time but it was not to be; and coach Akira Nishino did not mince his words talking about how it feels to fail yet again. “I am devastated,” he said.Japan entered Monday’s last-16 World Cup match against Belgium in Rostov-on-Don as the clear underdogs, but it surprisingly took the lead early in the second half with a pair of superbly taken goals. Then Belgium dug deep and produced a memorable comeback, scoring its first goal with 21 minutes left and the winner deep in injury time for a 3-2 win and a place in the quarterfinals.ADVERTISEMENT Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihan Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding LATEST STORIES Japan squeezed through to the knockout stage of this World Cup because it had a better disciplinary record than Senegal, after both teams finished the group phase with four points, the same goal difference and the same number of goals scored.It was the third time Japan has failed to make the last eight in the World Cup and maybe the closest it came to succeeding. The disappointment was obvious, with some of the players falling on their knees in despair after the final whistle, while others just cried.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSo shocked the Japanese players were by the defeat they just stood around doing nothing in the locker room after the match. “I told them to take a shower,” said Nishino.“We started off very well, but at the end, right at the end, to have conceded a goal like that, it was not expected,” a grim but collected Nishino told reporters. “We were leading and we were going to win, but I didn’t expect this reversal of the result. It was the World Cup, and we were faced with the depth and the strength of Belgium. That’s how I felt at the end of the game.” Nishino must have been surprised by how well his team was doing until Belgium began its comeback, having fended off the Belgians’ usually prolific attack in the first half and scoring two goals early in the next. Only a day earlier, he was rhetorically asking how he would attack a team like Belgium, citing its third place in the world’s FIFA ranking and Japan’s place 58 places down the list at 61.The best he could hope for, he said Sunday, was for his players to play “Japan-like” — contest every ball, control the ball, play dogged defense and stage lightening counterattacks. They’ve done all that, or at least much of it, but, by Nishino’s own admission, it did not match what Belgium had in their repertoire.“It might have been a very small difference, but I felt there wasn’t anything between (separating) us. The players throughout this tournament were very positive, better than in the past. Even against the likes of Belgium, they were confident. … But that little difference has to be filled going forward,” he said, offering an honest critique of his team.“(At the end) I was questioning myself, whether I had control of the game. We were 2-0 up, and still the score was reversed. It wasn’t the players. Maybe it was me who lost control of the game. When the (Belgium’s third) goal was conceded, I blamed myself, and I questioned my tactics.”ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town MOST READ Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Thon Maker owns up to role in Gilas-Australia free-for-all View commentslast_img read more

Serena, Venus set up Williams vs. Williams match at US Open

first_imgVenus Williams returns a shot to Camila Giorgi, of Italy, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)NEW YORK — Get ready for the latest Grand Slam installment of Williams vs. Williams. One big difference this time: The superstar siblings will be meeting in the third round at the U.S. Open, their earliest showdown at a major tournament in 20 years.Serena Williams set up the highly anticipated matchup at Flushing Meadows by hitting 13 aces and overwhelming 101st-ranked Carina Witthoeft of Germany 6-2, 6-2 in a little more than an hour in Arthur Ashe Stadium on Wednesday night. Hours earlier, across the way at Louis Armstrong Stadium, Venus Williams did her part with another straight-set victory, eliminating 40th-ranked Camila Giorgi of Italy 6-4, 7-5.ADVERTISEMENT DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced MOST READ Rafael Nadal was in action later Wednesday.During her post-victory news conference, which came long before Serena set foot on court against Witthoeft, Venus clearly had little interest in entertaining questions about the possible all-in-the-family match.“It’s early in the tournament, so both of us are going to be looking forward to continuing to play better,” Venus said. “Obviously, it’s definitely a tough draw.”Later, when a reporter tried to steer the conversation back to Williams vs. Williams, Venus offered this admonishment about the topic: “You’re beating it up now.”She was ever-so-slightly more forthcoming during her on-court interview, joking, “The last time we played, at the Australian, it was two against one,” a reference to the fact that Serena was pregnant when she beat Venus in the 2017 Australian Open final.“At least this time,” Venus told the crowd, “it’ll be fair.”Serena looked much more impressive Wednesday than her sister did, but the levels of competition were also different.Of the 82 points that went Venus’ way, only 13 came via her own winners. Giorgi had 29 winners, but also 41 unforced errors and 28 forced errors.Serena, meanwhile, put together a 30-10 edge in winners, then declared her serve much better than it’s been of late.Soon enough, her thoughts were on her next match and a certain, rather familiar, foe. Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Real Madrid joined by fresh faces in Champions League draw Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal LATEST STORIES ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’center_img “I never root against her, no matter what. So I think that’s the toughest part for me: When you always want someone to win, to have to beat them,” Serena said. “I know the same thing is for her.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs She leads the series 17-12, including 10-5 at majors.Both have been ranked No. 1. They have won a combined 30 Grand Slam singles trophies, 23 by Serena. They own eight U.S. Open singles championships, six by Serena.They’ve played each other in the finals of all four Slams, including at the U.S. Open in 2001 (when Venus won) and 2002 (when Serena did).“It’s incredible what they’ve done. I mean, amazing really. Obviously there’s been other siblings that have had fantastic careers in tennis, but none anywhere close to what they’ve managed to achieve,” said three-time major champion Andy Murray, whose first major since hip surgery ended with a four-set loss to No. 31 Fernando Verdasco. “I’d be surprised if anything like that ever happens again.”Seeded women who advanced on another day with the temperature topping 95 degrees (33 Celsius) included No. 7 Elina Svitolina, No. 8 Karolina Pliskova, No. 15 Elise Mertens, No. 19 Anastasija Sevastova and No. 23 Barbora Strycova, all in straight sets. Past men’s champions Juan Martin del Potro, who beat Dennis Kudla of the U.S., and Stan Wawrinka won, as did 2017 runner-up Kevin Anderson, and No. 11 seed John Isner.ADVERTISEMENT Peza offers relief to ecozone firms Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? “Unfortunately and fortunately, we have to play each other. We make each other better. We bring out the best when we play each other. It’s what we do,” Serena said. “I think we’re used to it now.”When they play Friday, it will be their 30th tour-level encounter — plus, of course, all those times when they traded shots from across the net as kids in California, then on practice courts all around the world. It’s also soonest the sisters have played each other at any Grand Slam since their very first tour match, all the way back at the 1998 Australian Open. Venus won that one. But since then, it’s been the younger Serena who’s grown dominant.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’The reason this match comes so early is that their rankings are not what they’ve been in the past. Serena is No. 26, playing in only the seventh tournament since she was off the tour for more than a year while having a baby. Even though the U.S. Tennis Association bumped her seeding up to reflect her past success, it still placed her at No. 17. Venus, meanwhile is No. 16.“It’s so young in the tournament,” Serena said. “We would have rather met later.” Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View commentslast_img read more