Randomized controlled trial in Uganda finds that paying people not to cut down trees works

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Avoided Deforestation, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Payments For Ecosystem Services, Research, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Researchers with Northwestern University in the United States conducted a randomized controlled trial involving 121 villages in a region with high rates of deforestation and forest degradation.Sixty villages participated in the PES scheme from 2011 to 2013 and were paid 70,000 Ugandan shillings (currently worth slightly less than $20, but worth $28 in 2012 dollars) per hectare to conserve their forests, while 61 formed the control group and received no compensation.The researchers found that, during the study period, tree cover declined by 4.2 percent in villages that were part of the program, less than half of the 9.1 percent tree cover loss in control villages. Emissions from land-use change, primarily deforestation, are responsible for about nine percent of global carbon emissions, according to a 2015 study. That’s why conservation efforts that aim to keep forests standing are considered crucial to the world’s efforts to slow global warming — and one popular conservation strategy for keeping forests standing is to, essentially, pay people not to cut down trees.The researchers behind a study published in Science last week say they’ve concluded that one such conservation initiative — known as a payments for ecosystem services (PES) program — in Uganda really paid off in terms of preventing deforestation.While slowing rates of deforestation in developing countries, where most forest destruction occurs today, is considered a cost-effective way to reduce emissions, the effectiveness of PES programs is still poorly understood. There’s the possibility that some people engaged in the program would have left their forests standing without being paid to do so, for instance, while others might leave their forests standing in exchange for cash but then simply shift their logging or land-clearing activities from a forest enrolled in the program to another area.Past research has shown that performance of PES programs can vary in terms of delivering environmental and social benefits, depending on a number of factors. In order to remove as much of this variability as possible when studying the program in Uganda, researchers with Northwestern University in the United States conducted a randomized controlled trial involving 121 villages in a region in the western part of the country with high rates of deforestation and forest degradation.Sixty villages participated in the PES scheme from 2011 to 2013 and were paid 70,000 Ugandan shillings (currently worth slightly less than $20, but worth $28 in 2012) per hectare to conserve their forests, while 61 formed the control group and received no compensation.Participants in the PES program receiving their payments for conserving trees. Photo courtesy of Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust.Designing the study this way was intended to allow the researchers to measure exactly how much deforestation was actually avoided due to the PES program. High-resolution satellite imagery was used to measure changes in the amount of land covered in trees. The researchers found that, during the study period, tree cover declined by 4.2 percent in villages that were part of the program, less than half of the 9.1 percent tree cover loss in control villages.“We found that the program had very large impacts on forest cover,” Seema Jayachandran, associate professor of economics at Northwestern and lead author of the study, said in a statement. There was still deforestation in the villages that participated in the PES program, Jayachandran noted, but there was far less than in villages where people weren’t paid to keep their forests standing.Jayachandran and team also found that this deforestation would not have been avoided without the program, and enrollees did not simply move to a neighboring forest and cut there instead. “It wasn’t the case that only forest owners who were planning to conserve anyway enrolled,” she said. “The payments changed people’s behavior and prompted them to conserve. And we didn’t find any evidence that they simply shifted their tree-cutting elsewhere. This truly was a net increase in forest cover in the study region.”The team also analyzed the cost-effectiveness of the program by calculating the monetary value of the delayed carbon emissions using the “social cost of carbon,” or an estimate of the damage done to the environment by carbon emissions, and comparing that to the cost of the program.Based on the social cost of carbon as calculated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which was $39 per metric ton in 2012, the researchers determined that the benefits of the program were 2.4 times larger than the costs. Not only that, but even if landowners immediately set to cutting down all the trees they would have cut down during the study period as soon as the two-year program ended, that delay in the emissions from deforestation would still be worth 0.8 times more than the program costs.Either way, Jayachandra said that that is a substantial benefit for the global climate, even compared to other conservation intervention types: “We found that the benefit of the delayed CO2 emissions was over twice as large as the program costs. For many other environmental policies, the value of the averted CO2 is in fact smaller than the program costs.”Mountain gorillas in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in southwestern Uganda. The villages studied are in western part of the country. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONJayachandran, S., de Laat, J., Lambin, E. F., Stanton, C. Y., Audy, R., & Thomas, N. E. (2017). Cash for carbon: A randomized trial of payments for ecosystem services to reduce deforestation. Science, 357(6348), 267-273. doi:10.1126/science.aan0568Quéré, C. L., Moriarty, R., Andrew, R. M., Canadell, J. G., Sitch, S., Korsbakken, J. I., … & Houghton, R. A. (2015). Global carbon budget 2015. Earth System Science Data, 7(2), 349-396. doi:10.5194/essd-7-349-2015Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

‘Ships, sonar and surveys’: Film explores impacts of a noisy ocean

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animal Behavior, Animals, Charismatic Animals, Climate Change, Conservation, Dolphins, Energy, Environment, Environmental Activism, Globalization, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Mining, Noise Pollution, Oceans, Oil Drilling, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Sonar, air gun charges for oil and gas exploration, and ship traffic in the ocean can interfere with marine mammal communication, cause physiological problems and drive animals to strand on beaches.A new film, “Sonic Sea,” traces the risks of an increasingly noisy ocean to whales, dolphins and porpoises.The film is a finalist for the Best Science in Nature prize at the 2017 Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in Jackson, Wyoming.The winners will be announced Sept. 28. Animals in the world’s oceans have faced an ever-increasing cacophony in recent decades. They’re inundated with sonar intended to keep countries safe, air gun charges that help energy companies find new sources of oil and gas, and the sounds of the 60,000 commercial ships that ply the seas at any given time.A new film called “Sonic Sea” by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Imaginary Forces catalogs the growing risks that noise poses to whales, dolphins, and porpoises and what scientists and conservationists are doing about it. It’s up for the Best Science in Nature prize at the 2017 Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival beginning Sept. 24 in Jackson, Wyoming.The film ‘Sonic Sea’ explores the impacts of sound in the ocean on whales, dolphins and porpoises. Image courtesy of Imaginary ForcesCetaceans, the group that includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises, depend on sound to communicate, to hunt and to avoid predators.“The problem is, in the ocean, we are injecting enormous amounts of noise, so much so that we are basically acoustically bleaching the ocean,” said bioacoustician Christopher Clark of Cornell University in the film. “All the singing voices of the planet are lost in that cloud of noise.”The recent uptick in sounds in the ocean has also been linked to lesions on cetaceans’ organs and hemorrhaging around their brains. It’s also been connected to mass strandings, in which large animals beach themselves, often with fatal consequences. Scientists suspect that they may be trying to get away from the disturbing noise.During the film, Molly Patterson, a research assistant at OrcaLab in British Columbia, said that the din can sometimes give her and her colleagues a headache as they monitor nearby waters for the clicks and whistles of orca (Orcinus orca) pods. It sometimes forces them to take their headphones off, she said, which is a luxury their study subjects don’t have.“They can’t turn the volume down,” Patterson said.Until now, this problem has mostly been “out of sight, out of mind” for us humans, said Paul Spong, who directs OrcaLab. But the filmmakers of Sonic Sea hope that will change when audiences see these unintended consequences and how we can minimize the damage.Mongabay discussed the story behind “Sonic Sea” with directors Daniel Hinerfeld of NRDC and Michelle Dougherty of Imaginary Forces by email.Mongabay: What is your background and why did you make this film?Hinerfeld: I grew up in Los Angeles, went to Vassar College and the London School of Economics and then started working as a journalist for outlets such as Rolling Stone, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other publications. In the early 1990s, I started reporting and producing for NPR. Since 2003, I’ve worked at NRDC, a large environmental advocacy organization, where I founded a film program in the mid-2000s. I made “Sonic Sea” to raise awareness about the devastating impact of ocean noise pollution, and to let people know that we can and must solve the problem.Dougherty: My background is in design and commercial directing, I [am a graduate of] the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and I am currently a director at the creative company Imaginary Forces. I wanted to make this film to illuminate an invisible problem — ocean noise pollution — because I thought it was an important issue that most people didn’t know about, because they can’t see it. I felt that by creating a film that was character-driven and using design to illustrate an otherwise invisible issue, we could grab the hearts and heads of our audiences, so they also would want to help make a change.Mongabay: What was a highlight in making this film? What were the biggest challenges?Hinerfeld: There were so many highlights to making the film! The main highlight was getting to work with the amazing cast and crew — ocean scientists and advocates such as Sylvia Earle, Paul Spong, Christopher Clark and Ken Balcomb. They’re brilliant, dedicated people who know so much about the natural world, and have done so much to protect it. Getting to meet and work with Sting and Rachel McAdams was wonderful too. They both opened themselves up and used their talent and fame to help protect the ocean. And the whales! Let’s not forget the whales, especially the orcas and humpbacks we saw and heard up-close while spending time with Paul Spong at his magical research station on Hanson Island, British Columbia. Besides the usual challenges of filmmaking (coming up with the money and keeping on schedule), the biggest challenge of making “Sonic Sea” was figuring out how to bring a hidden world of sound to life on film.Dougherty: The highlights for me were working with all these super talented people — our editor, writer, directors of photography, designers, producers, composer and sound designers … It really takes a village to make a film! And the scientists who have dedicated their life’s work to studying whales — [they were] so inspiring to me, as well as the lawyers at NRDC that fight for their survival. This film is really THEIR story, and we were there to bring it to life.A visualization of shipping pathways around the globe. At any time, about 60,000 commercial ships are afloat on the world’s oceans. Image courtesy of Imaginary ForcesMongabay: During shooting, did you encounter resistance to the idea that the noisy ocean many have consequences for the animals that live there? If so, who or what groups of people disagreed with you?Hinerfeld: We did not encounter that resistance. Even the two former senior members of the U.S. Navy who are in the film acknowledge that noise harms whales and other marine life and that the Navy needs to make accommodations for that in its training. Likewise, the shipping industry representative in the film acknowledges the problem and is helping push her industry toward solutions. That said, the fossil fuel industry refused to talk with us. We asked quite a few people at several major companies, and they didn’t respond. I doubt they accept the scientific fact that their noise is harming the ocean, but they apparently don’t believe in climate change either.Dougherty: I only remember one person that I encountered while shooting people on the streets for one of the sequences we created. It was a man who said he was a scientist that said this — “Oh, the whales will adapt.” I thought to myself, What if they can’t adapt quickly enough? Will we wipe them out? Is it worth that risk?Mongabay: Was there some point during the production process at which you realized that you were covering a critical issue that most people don’t know a lot about?Hinerfeld: We knew from the beginning this was an important project because we had the advantage of working alongside NRDC advocates and scientists who are experts in the field. They showed us from the outset how serious a problem ocean noise pollution is, and we knew from personal experience that the issue was just totally beneath the radar. The general public didn’t know anything about it.Mongabay: What do you hope audiences take away from Sonic Sea?Hinerfeld: I hope people leave the film understanding that we’re harming the ocean with our reckless noise pollution and that we can and must solve the problem. I hope the film helps people realize that the ocean is part of us, that we are part of the ocean and that we cannot thrive unless the ocean thrives. I also hope audiences are moved by the film emotionally so that they talk about the issue with their friends, share the film and take steps in their lives to address the problem.Dougherty: I hope that audiences understand the importance of helping these animals to survive. I hope they understand how incredible these animals are and the importance of having them on this Earth [and] that we can make a change for their survival.A humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae). Some whale species can live a century or more. Image courtesy of Imaginary ForcesMongabay: How can people help tackle this problem of noise in the ocean?Hinerfeld: The same kind of consumer changes that can help fight climate change also combat ocean noise: thinking about what we consume and where it comes from, consuming less, buying locally, moving away from fossil fuel-based transportation — all of these things will help reduce the sonic burden we put on the ocean. People can also become ocean noise activists by going to www.sonicsea.org, clicking “take action,” and signing up. That will enable NRDC and [the International Fund for Animal Welfare] (our partner on the film) to reach out when we need large numbers of people to support healthy ocean policies by signing petitions, calling or writing members of Congress and otherwise raising their voices to protect whales and other marine life. The oil and gas industry has a friend in [U.S. President] Donald Trump, and they’re moving fast to roll-back environmental protections, including bedrock laws that protect the ocean. Finally, people can help raise awareness by sharing Sonic Sea, especially with schools. If you’d like to get Sonic Sea into classrooms, email allie@rocofilms.com to gift the film and its study guide to your alma mater or your children’s school.Mongabay: What’s next for you?Hinerfeld: I’m working on a few non-film projects, but I hope my next film will be a documentary about climate change from the perspective of the U.S. military, which is extremely concerned about the consequences of a warming planet for its operations and its mission. I think a lot of Americans who don’t understand or believe in climate change trust the military and would see things differently if they saw the issue through the eyes of our soldiers.Dougherty: I’m always working on a myriad of commercial work, as well as pitching content ideas to people who hopefully will help to create them. I would also like to team up with Daniel again to create this film on climate change.Editor’s Note: This interview was edited for style and length.Banner image of researchers conducting an autopsy on a female beaked whale in New Zealand by Avenue (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL, via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonlast_img read more

The mine that promised to protect the environment: A cautionary tale

first_imgIn 2004, mining behemoth Rio Tinto made a bold commitment not just to protect but to “improve” the environment at its mining sites in ecologically sensitive areas around the world, through a strategy it called “net positive impact.”A site in southeastern Madagascar where it was opening an ilmenite mine amid a gravely threatened coastal forest that’s home to unique species found nowhere else on the planet seemed like a good place to start.A little more than a decade later, however, the initiative was dead: facing financial headwinds and falling behind on its pledges, Rio Tinto abandoned the NPI strategy in 2016.In an article in the July issue of Scientific American, Mongabay contributor Rowan Moore Gerety tells how Rio Tinto came to make that promise and then to renege on it — and describes the result for Madagascar’s coastal forest and the people who live there. Did one of the largest mining companies in the world make good on its promise to protect the environment as it extracted precious minerals from one of the poorest countries in the world? If you’re looking for the answer, the title of an article in the July issue of Scientific American should give it away: “Broken Promises.”In it, Rowan Moore Gerety tells of how the London-headquartered mining giant Rio Tinto, a Fortune 500 company, came to make that promise in seeking ilmenite in Madagascar, and then to renege on it. The story, born out of Moore’s reporting for Mongabay in Madagascar, tries to answer a more essential question: Can a company really do good, in this case, environmental good, even at a cost? And the equally vexing question of whether conservationists and company representatives can ever see eye to eye — at least long enough for such an initiative to make headway?Faly Randriatafika, who runs QMM’s environmental program, poses beneath a ravenala tree inside the remaining forest in the Mandena “avoidance zone,” an area QMM agreed not to disturb that is now a formal protected area. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.In 2004, despite having earned “a reputation as an unscrupulous actor in a heavily polluting industry,” as Gerety writes, Rio Tinto committed not just to protect but to “improve” the environment at its mining sites in ecologically sensitive areas around the world. The company called its strategy net positive impact (NPI). The site where it was opening the ilmenite mine on the southeastern tip of Madagascar is a gravely threatened coastal forest that’s home to unique species found nowhere else on the planet. It seemed like a good place to start.The start indeed was good. Rio Tinto sought and received the help of conservationists and researchers in Madagascar. They signed up with the hope of making it work. A biodiversity committee was set up. The mining behemoth and its local subsidiary, QIT Madagascar Minerals (QMM), invested in studying and assessing the site, its vulnerabilities and riches, and what was at stake. Among other measures, the company pledged to avoid disturbing high-quality forests, to restore forests it did clear, and to pay to conserve forests offsite as compensation for the damage it did cause.Map shows the location of Rio Tinto’s QIT Madagascar Minerals mine. Image courtesy of Google Earth.A little more than a decade later, however, the initiative was dead. Facing financial headwinds and falling behind on its pledges, Rio Tinto abandoned the NPI strategy in 2016 in favor of a nebulous policy of “minimizing residual impact.” The members of the biodiversity committee all resigned. What happened in between makes for an insightful tale told masterfully by Gerety.It also holds important lessons: for one, limited government oversight makes everything more difficult. As Jocelyn Rakotomalala, who runs a local NGO that collaborated with QMM on social and community projects, says in the story: “Mining companies could conserve more if only the state were more demanding.”Ilmenite mining requires removing all vegetation from the landscape. In the background, mountains loom over QMM’s processing plant. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.To be sure, Rio Tinto and QMM do maintain ongoing environmental programs. And the mine isn’t the only threat to the area’s forests. “Mine or no mine, charcoal making and farming will soon take over what little forest remains,” Gerety writes. “Yet there can be no doubt that the mining is taking a grave toll — not only on forests and wildlife but on people.”Gerety reports that local residents complain the mine has curtailed wetlands that supply a reed they weave as a source of income, and that it did not compensate them for lost farmland in a timely fashion. Moreover, the mine also recently acknowledged breaching an important wetland, raising concerns that it could contaminate a lake that local people use for drinking water with radionuclide-enriched tailings.Children play in Analangbenja, a village that overlooks the QMM mine site in Mandena. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.Despite the disappointments on the ground and dashed hopes that Rio Tinto’s lofty pledges would spark a trend of environmental commitments in the mining industry, some conservationists who had advised the mine and quit said they would do it all over. One even signed back up to serve on the mine’s new biodiversity and natural resources management committee, according to Gerety. The reason? Thanks to their efforts, the mine has had less of an impact than it would otherwise likely have had.The article appears as “Broken Promises” in Scientific American’s July 2019 issue and behind a paywall as “The Ecologists and the Mine” on the magazine’s website. Mongabay paid for Rowan Moore Gerety’s reporting trip to Madagascar for the story.Faly Randriatafika, left, runs a nursery of native plants in Mandena, Madagascar, as part of QMM’s environmental program. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.Banner image: Dredged ilmenite-rich sand awaits processing outside QMM’s Tolagnaro plant in southeastern Madagascar. Image by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kessler Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Social Responsibility, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Human Rights, Mining, Pollution, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Water, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Three pangolin species closer to extinction: IUCN

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Mammals, Pangolins, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Of the eight known species of pangolins, one of the world’s most trafficked mammals, two African species, the while-bellied (Phataginus tricuspis) and the giant ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantea), have been moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” on the IUCN Red List.One Asian species, the Philippine pangolin (Manis culionensis), has been uplisted from “endangered” to “critically endangered”, according to the latest update by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).The other species remain in their respective threatened categories and haven’t improved in status. The pangolin’s future looks gloomy, according to the latest update by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which assesses the conservation status of species.Of the eight known species of the pangolin, one of the world’s most trafficked mammals, two African species, the while-bellied (Phataginus tricuspis) and the giant ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantea), have been moved from “vulnerable” to “endangered” on the IUCN Red List. One Asian species, the Philippine pangolin (Manis culionensis), has been uplisted from “endangered” to “critically endangered.” No species improved in status in the assessment.Much of the decline in the armor-clad mammals can be attributed to the loss of their habitat and large-scale poaching for the animals’ scales and meat, experts say.“It is extremely disheartening but unsurprising that three additional pangolin species are now formally classified as endangered and critically endangered,” Audrey Delsink, Africa wildlife director of Humane Society International, said in a statement.White-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) in the central Democratic Republic of the Congo. Image by Valerius Tygart via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Pangolin scales, largely made of keratin just like human fingernails, are sought after in Asian markets, mainly China and Vietnam, where people erroneously believe the scales have medicinal properties, such as promoting menstruation and lactation and in treating rheumatism and arthritis.The shy mammals are also hunted for bushmeat in Africa, although in China, pangolin meat is consumed both as a luxury food item and for its purported curative properties. In 2016, countries voted to list all eight species of pangolin on CITES Appendix I, banning commercial trade in the animals. Yet, widespread trafficking of their body parts continues.Despite the rampant poaching, researchers know little about pangolins, also known as scaly anteaters, because they eat ants and termites. The animals are nocturnal and difficult to survey, and there isn’t a whole lot of quantitative information about their population status in the wild. What conservationists do know, however, is that both the live animal and its scales, meat, and other body parts keep appearing in illegal wildlife seizures around the world. Between 2000 and 2019, for instance, at least 850,000 pangolins were trafficked internationally, a recent study found.Every species of pangolin is threatened with extinction, and their status is only getting worse. Three of the four Asian pangolins — the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla), Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), and Philippine pangolin — are critically endangered, while the Indian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List.All four African species — the Cape or Temminck’s ground pangolin (Smutsia temminckii), white-bellied or tree pangolin, giant ground pangolin and black-bellied or long-tailed pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla) — were previously listed as vulnerable. The latest IUCN update moves two of these species to a higher threat category.The pangolins’ decline comes from both the widespread loss of their forest habitat and increased targeting by poachers, following the decline in Asian pangolin numbers, the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) Pangolin Specialist Group noted in the species’ assessments.“Pangolins continue to get hammered by poaching and trade, and extinction is on the horizon for these adorably odd creatures,” Sarah Uhlemann, international program director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement.Adam Peyman, wildlife programs and operations manager for Humane Society International, added, “The new Red List assessments illustrate the urgent need for action to stop these charming animals from slipping into extinction … The trafficking network is global, and so must our response be to save the pangolin.”Taxidermied giant pangolin (Smutsia gigantea) at the Natural History Museum in London, England. Image by Emőke Dénes via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Citation:Nixon, S., Pietersen, D., Challender, D., Hoffmann, M., Godwill Ichu, I., Bruce, T., Ingram, D.J., Matthews, N. & Shirley, M.H. 2019. Smutsia gigantea. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T12762A123584478. Downloaded on 18 December 2019.Schoppe, S., Katsis, L. & Lagrada, L. 2019. Manis culionensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T136497A123586862. Downloaded on 18 December 2019.Pietersen, D., Moumbolou, C., Ingram, D.J., Soewu, D., Jansen, R., Sodeinde, O., Keboy Mov Linkey Iflankoy, C., Challender, D. & Shirley, M.H. 2019. Phataginus tricuspis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T12767A123586469. Downloaded on 18 December 2019.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Probe to be launched into QPR’s poor outfield

first_imgPORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC): An investigation is to be launched into the reasons for the poor condition of the outfield at the Queen’s Park Oval (QPR) which led to play in the fourth Test between West Indies and India being abandoned after only 22 overs. The Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Board (TTCB) announced that it is teaming up with the Queen’s Park Cricket Club (QPCC), to carry out the probe after the fourth and final Test finished in a farcical draw on the final day Monday. Rain halted play just before lunch on last Thursday’s opening day and the action never resumed, raising huge questions about the historic ground’s drainage system and mopping up operations. Attempted mopping up operations by ground-staff occurred in an abundance of sunshine at Queen’s Park Oval but were all in vain. “As hosts, the Trinidad and Tobago cricket Board (TTCB) and the QPCC regret that limited play was possible in the fourth Test match between WI and India at the Queen’s Park Oval,” the statement read. “We have jointly launched an investigation to determine what occurred with a view to remedying the situation so that this does not occur in the future. Once this has been done it will be presented to the WICB.” West Indies reached 62 for two in nearly two hours of play possible in the morning session of the opening day. West Indies lost the opening Test in Antigua by an innings and 92 runs, drew the second in Jamaica before suffering a 237-run defeat in the third Test in St Lucia. EXPRESSED REGRETlast_img read more

City Hall flouts injunction, bulldozes 48-year-old business

first_img– says “Dread Shop” is known for unsavoury activitiesDespite an Injunction, the Mayor and City Council in the wee hours of Thursday moved in and dismantled the famous ‘Dread Shop’, located at Russell Square, Stabroek, Georgetown, a business which has been in existence for some 48 years.The council workers sometime around 03:00h began the demolition.The proprietor Anthony Forde, 74, who could not hold back his tears said he was not informed that his building would have been demolished and had only learnt at 09:30h that his business was destroyed.He explained that the “Dread Shop” night spot has existed since 1968 and noted that he has been paying rates and taxes for years.Forde and his nephew related that they did not get an opportunity to retrieve their valuables and that “junkies” made off with many of the items.Among their lost property were a pools table and television sets. The nephew who preferred not be named, was of the view that the government has “no concern” for ordinary businesspeople.Attorney Nigel Hughes, who is representing Forde, stressed that City Hall has shown “disregard” to the courts as the matter is still being addressed.“This has got to be the most outrageous act I’ve seen in a long time because [the matter is] actively going to mediation on the recommendation of the Court of Appeal and then they failed to turn up at the mediation and the Court of Appeal still has conduct of this matter and they believe they can disregard this act,” Hughes posited.The attorney explained that after he called the City Engineer on Thursday afternoon, Town Clerk Royston King then confirmed that demolition actions were indeed taken.“I believe that where people decide that they are not going to obey the law of the land and where they are not going to obey the outcomes of the court proceedings to deal with this particular piece of property then we are in a very dangerous state,” the attorney warned.“There is a dispute right now between Mr Patterson’s Ministry and the City Council about who actually owns this square because it was donated by the Russell family [while] the Ministry [of Public Infrastructure] claims it is their territory and the city council claims it is their territory,” the attorney further explained.Meanwhile, also slated for demolition is the nearby “Island Snackette” which has been in operation for almost 50 years. Daughter of the original proprietors Abeola Fung told this newspaper that her family has invested “millions of dollars” to improve the standard of the business. They claim that City Hall said their structure will also be torn down. Fung further related that some years ago City Hall had approved a plan for rehabilitation works to their structure.City Hall has been relocating vendors and stall owners in a move that it said will see a transformation of the Stabroek Market Square. While some vendors have welcomed the change, others have protested the initiatives of City Council viewing them as “unfair” and “uncaring”.‘UNSAVOURY’ ACTIVITIESMeanwhile, City Council in a statement Thursday afternoon, explained that a technical team attached to the Municipality’s Engineer’s Department carried out a removal exercise that saw “the flattening of the so called ‘dread shop’ located west of Parliament Building”.Attorney Nigel Hughes“The Town Clerk’s office had given earlier notice to the structure’s operators, while making specific reference to what was described as ‘unsavoury’ activities taking place there, particularly on Friday nights. Operations at this facility was also said to be in direct breach of city public health laws,” the statement added.last_img read more

Port Mourant Market Clerk allegedly assaulted by overseer

first_imgPolice on the Corentyne, Berbice, are investigating a report by the Clerk of the Port Mourant Market that he was assaulted by the Neighbourhood Democratic Council (NDC) Overseer inside the office.Guyana Times understands that the report was filed on Thursday and this is not the first time allegations of this nature have being levelled against the Overseer.Clerk of the Port Mourant Market, Ryan Mallay, told this publication that he, along with four other employers who work at the market, were summoned to a meeting at the Overseer’s office.According to him, upon arrival at the Overseer’s office, they were asked why they were there and had to remind the Overseer that she summoned them to the meeting. According to Mallay, the Overseer then took out her cellphone and appeared to be recording them, but suspecting something was amiss, he asked her if they were working the following day and after not receiving an answer, got up and left.Mallay related that he was the last to leave the office and as he existed the room, the Overseer pushed him. “She then come and pull me by my shirt and rip off some of the buttons and hold my vest and tear it down,” he said.Another staff member, who is a labourer at the market, said after the Overseer pulled the Market Clerk’s shirt off, she began checking his pockets.According to him, shortly after that, she asked Mallay for her cellular phone, accusing him of stealing it but then the others said the cellphone was in her hand.Mallay said he and a colleague reported the incident to the Police.Meanwhile, Chairman of the Johns/Port Mourant NDC, Ishwarsammy Narinesammy in an invited comment said the Overseer reported that she and the Market Clerk were involved in a scuffle. The Overseer is also claiming that Mallay injured her during the scuffle.According to the Chairman, the NDC has written letters to the Communities Ministry and the Local Government Commission in relation to the alleged conduct of the NDC Overseer, but to date, no action nor investigation was undertaken.“I am fed up,” the NDC Chairman said.Narinesammy said since the matter is with the Police, the NDC will let law enforcement deal with it.On August 15, 2016, the same Overseer was accused of assaulting a reporter, who was covering a protest by Port Mourant market vendors.last_img read more

Heavy winds rip through La Parfaite Harmonie homes

first_imgBased on information received, gale force winds suddenly descended on the community of Onderneeming, La Parfaite Harmonie, West Bank Demerara on Tuesday at about 10:30h; and after nearly 15 minutes of a sustained squall, several residents were left without roofs over their heads, at least seven houses were destroyed, one building had even collapsed under the pressure of sustained high-intensity winds, and there was massive damage to properties in the aftermath of this incident.A neighbour is seen assisting a resident who had her roof blown off and home damaged by the high-intensity windGuyana Times visited the community and observed that a number of persons were assisting affected home owners to repair their roofs, while others were observed gathering zinc sheets which had been dispersed along the streets.One of the villagers, Ursula Evans, recalled the horrific incident. “There was a squall (at) about 10:30 this morning; and then it moved to the back, rip off the roof, and it go right away round through this man house! This was a high house, and it drop to the ground, and the man’s zinc raise up. It’s like about ten or fifteen more to the back so, and just these three here. Nobody was injured, because they even pick up zinc in the middle of the road deh. That swirl go round and come back round and knock the lantern post!” she stated.This house located a short distance away from one of the houses that collapsed after the heavy windsAnother home owner, who identified herself as Cooja, said she lost almost her entire roof by the disastrous winds, which also dislodged electrical wires. She explained that she is now contemplating her next move, since she is not financially stable at the moment to have the damages to her home repaired.“I was approaching the back door to close it when I saw…I don’t know if it was leaves, but I looked down the road and I say, ‘Man, this is not leaves!’ By that time the children hustle come inside. I look back again and I see zinc floating in the air!” Cooja detailed.With everyone in the house, Cooja said, she made sure that everyone was hidden under the beds, as she expected the worst.Another house which was completely destroyed by the winds“I say, ‘This is more than just a normal breeze!’ and I start hollering for, ‘The Blood of Jesus!’ Then I heard a noise, and the whole zinc start to rip off from the top! Everything just went bizarre. The blinds, if you come in, you will see everything tear down. The electricity, everything in a disaster… This is going to affect me terrible, because we don’t have money right now,” the devastated Cooja related.She told Guyana Times this is the second time in four years that an incident of this nature had occurred in the community, but this time around it has been much worse.Meanwhile, no one has been reported injured, but the residents are calling for some assistance in getting their lives back to normalcy. (Yanalla Dalrymple)last_img read more

Zenit St Petersburg boss Villas-Boas wants to end Falcao’s Premier League nightmare

first_imgFormer Chelsea and Tottenham manager Andre Villas-Boas wants to sign Premier League flop Radamel Falcao for Zenit St Petersburg.The 29-year-old striker only arrived at Chelsea in the summer on a season-long loan but after a miserable start to life at Stamford Bridge, it has been reported he would be willing to cut the deal short and return to parent club Monaco.And now Villas-Boas wants a reunion with Falcao, who he managed during his time in charge at Porto.The Colombia international was once considered one of the most feared strikers on the planet after prolific spells at Porto and Atletico Madrid.But his career has stagnated since he moved to Monaco in 2013. He scored 11 goals in his first year in France but then joined Manchester United on loan in September 2014.He endured a nightmare year at Old Trafford, scoring just four Premier League goals in 26 appearances and he has not fared any better at his second English club Chelsea.Falcao has been understudy to Diego Costa and has so far started just one game, with a further seven appearances coming from the bench, and he has so far scored only once in the league.But now AVB is ready to offer him a January escape route – and the chance to resurrect his career in Russia, according to reports. Andre Villas-Boas and Radamel Falcao during their days at Porto 1last_img read more

Burglar who ransacked hairdressing salon has been addict since he was 8 years old

first_imgA young man who broke into a hairdressing salon and a beauticians has been a drug addict since he was just 8 years old, a court has heard.Daryll Cassells appeared before Letterkenny District Court charged with two counts of burglary. The 22-year-old, who is originally from Tallaght in Dublin, carried out the raids on July 25th, 2015.Garda Inspector Sean Grant said LK Hair Designs and Beauty by Grainne, both located at Larkin’s Lane, were broken into and ransacked.A total of €400 in cash and a cash register worth €800 was taken from LK Hair Designs while cash was also taken from Beauty by Grainne.CCTV footage of the area later showed Cassells walking down the road and then swinging out of a door handle on LK Hair Design and snapping it.He was later arrested by Gardai and admitted to breaking into the premises.His solicitor, Mr Gordon Curley said his client had been addicted to drugs since he was 8 years old when he was in care and had a very tough upbringing.However, he said he is now clean and had a baby daughter 5 months ago and this had given him some direction in his life.Cassells was previously late by two hours for court and he blamed his washing machine.Judge Conal Gibbons asked the accused what his washing machine had to do with him being late?Cassells replied that he had no clean clothes.“Oh well, that’s okay then. We couldn’t have you coming in here naked. That wouldn’t be good at all.“The next time you’re coming to court, make sure you put your clothes in the washing machine the night before and put it on automatic,” he said.Cassells told Judge Paul Kelly that he was trying his best and that he was now starting to study for his Leaving Certificate.Judge Kelly adjourned the case until January 18th for a Probation Report with a view to a community service sentence.Burglar who ransacked hairdressing salon has been addict since he was 8 years old was last modified: October 24th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtDaryll CassellsGardaiHairdressing Salonletterkennylast_img read more