China’s Domestic Dams: Hydropower not only an export for world’s biggest dam builder

first_imgChina is the world’s biggest financier and builder of dams, with projects across the globe. It also has extensive domestic hydropower ambitions.Twenty dams have been proposed or constructed along the Lancang, China’s stretch of the Mekong River.Separated from village life by deep canyons, the Lancang Jiang, whose name means “Turbulent River,” is viewed by many in China as good for little more than its hydropower potential.Further downstream, in the Mekong Basin, the river is the source of sustenance for tens of millions of people. Any changes to upstream ecology could have severe effects in downstream countries. The construction of a hydropower dam by the state-owned SinoHydro company is one of many underway along the Lancang River in China. Photo by Luc Forsyth.YUNNAN, China — The building site of the Wunonglong hydropower dam is not ringed by barbed wire fences and security guards as one might expect. Instead, visitors to this remote northern stretch of China’s Yunnan province find themselves standing on a specially built viewing platform surrounded by a small but tidy ornamental garden and informative signage about the dam’s projected output. Though the dam is more than a year from completion, manicured bonsai trees and imported wild grasses have already been planted. When finished in 2018, more than 800 feet of roller-compacted concrete will span the Lancang and rise nearly 500 feet into the air in an incredible demonstration of China’s ability to bend nature to its purposes.The Lancang Jiang, as the Chinese call the Mekong, can be translated into English as “the Turbulent River,” a name that makes immediate sense to anyone who has seen it. Churning torrents of whitewater rush through the bottoms of deep canyons snaking their way through China’s Yunnan province. Here, on China’s Western frontier, the wild Lancang bears little resemblance to the lazy brown expanse that will become the Mekong once it crosses the Lao border. Perhaps it should not be surprising, then, that the Chinese government has unleashed the full might of its engineering prowess on the Lancang in the form of more than 20 already built or proposed hydropower dams (pdf).In a little more than a year, Wunonglong’s three gravity-fed turbines will convert the Lancang’s raw energy into an estimated 990 megawatts of electricity — enough, by some estimates, to power almost a million homes.Long before the Lancang builds enough force to generate electricity, it begins its life on the glaciers of the Tibetan Plateau. As the sun pierces the thin atmosphere at 5,200 meters (3.2 miles) above sea level, ice melts into trickles of water and begins an epic journey to feed Asia’s biggest rivers.In addition to the Lancang, the Yangtze, the Ganges, and the Yellow Rivers all originate here. Ultimately, one out of five people on earth depend on the water from this part of the world for survival. The Lancang in particular, is one of the world’s most life-giving rivers, especially once it becomes known as the Mekong. Second in biodiversity only to the Amazon, and the source of sustenance for more than 60 million Southeast Asians, any disruptions in the Mekong’s hydrological or ecological balance could have disastrous human impacts.In this part of Yunnan, the Lancang is not yet the nurturing force that it will later become, and this must be kept in mind when judging China’s attitudes towards it. In the largely ethnically Tibetan mountain village of Deqin, locals say that they have little to no regular interaction with the river. “This river is useless,” said bus driver Cili Dingzhu. “It doesn’t provide anything for us here.”last_img read more

UN moves one step closer to convening high seas treaty negotiations

first_imgClimate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Environment, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Protected Areas Article published by Mike Gaworecki While the high seas can be said to belong to everyone, no one body or agency is tasked with their governance and there is no comprehensive management structure in place that is capable of protecting the marine life that relies on them.The UN General Assembly adopted a resolution in 2015 calling for a preparatory committee to explore the feasibility of an international treaty designed to protect high seas biodiversity and report back by the end of 2017.Environmentalists applauded the outcome of last week’s meeting: “We are pleased that the UN Preparatory Committee has completed its mandate and agreed by consensus to recommendations that will move this issue to the next phase of high seas conservation,” said Liz Karan, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ campaign to protect ocean life on the high seas. The fourth and final meeting of a United Nations Preparatory Committee ended last week with a recommendation that the UN General Assembly convene treaty negotiations aimed at protecting the high seas.The so-called high seas comprise more than 40 percent of Earth’s surface and about two-thirds of the oceans. They are vast areas that lie 200 nautical miles or more from shore — in other words, beyond any national jurisdiction. That means that, while the high seas can be said to belong to everyone, no one body or agency is tasked with their governance and there is no comprehensive management structure in place that is capable of protecting the marine life that relies on them.The UN General Assembly adopted a resolution in 2015 calling for a preparatory committee to explore the feasibility of an international treaty designed to protect high seas biodiversity and report back by the end of 2017.Environmentalists applauded the outcome of last week’s meeting: “We are pleased that the UN Preparatory Committee has completed its mandate and agreed by consensus to recommendations that will move this issue to the next phase of high seas conservation,” Liz Karan, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ campaign to protect ocean life on the high seas, said in a statement.While the Preparatory Committee’s report includes substantive recommendations on elements to be included in any eventual high seas agreement, there are some crucial issues that still must be hammered out through international treaty negotiations, such as determining exactly how marine protected areas (MPAs) and marine reserves could be created and managed on the high seas.A patchwork of governance and management mechanisms regulate human activities like fishing, seabed mining, and shipping on the high seas, but there is little coordination between them, which has left marine ecosystems in the open ocean highly vulnerable. While protected areas cover 13.2 percent of marine environments in countries’ territorial waters, just 0.25 percent of marine environments beyond national jurisdiction are afforded some kind of protected status, according to the UN.There would seem to be momentum building towards a treaty to address the lack of protections for marine environments in the open ocean. In addition to the recommendation made by the UN Preparatory Committee, world leaders meeting at the first-ever UN Ocean Conference in New York City last month issued a call for action to “affirm our strong commitment to conserve and sustainably use our oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.”The purpose of the UN Ocean Conference was for governmental representatives to come together and strategize around the implementation of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 14, which aims to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.” Delegates to the conference specifically mentioned MPAs in their call to action as management tools that can “enhance ocean resilience and better conserve and sustainably use marine biodiversity.”The impacts of climate change on both the open ocean and coastal areas is of particular concern. But, according to Pew’s Karan, even the countries that affirmed their support of Sustainable Development Goal 14 are unlikely to be able to meet their sustainability goals without an overarching governance framework for the high seas.“The ocean doesn’t respect political boundaries,” Karan told Mongabay. “What’s happening within countries’ national waters affects what happens on the high seas and will be affected by what happens on the high seas. Making sure that there’s proper governance on the high seas will allow for the establishment of marine protected areas, and ensure that robust environmental impact assessments are being conducted for any activities on the high seas. That will ultimately help benefit countries’ national waters and enable them to meet the sustainable development goals.”Research has shown that marine protected areas and reserves could play a crucial role in ocean conservation efforts in an era of rising global temperatures. An international team of researchers published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences (PNAS) earlier this year, for instance, that concluded that “well-managed marine reserves may help marine ecosystems and people adapt to five prominent impacts of climate change: acidification, sea-level rise, intensification of storms, shifts in species distribution, and decreased productivity and oxygen availability, as well as their cumulative effects.”The authors of the PNAS study add that “marine reserves are a viable low-tech, cost-effective adaptation strategy that would yield multiple cobenefits from local to global scales, improving the outlook for the environment and people into the future.”It’s important to note that, while the Preparatory Committee recommended that high seas treaty negotiations be convened, the responsibility for actually launching an intergovernmental conference to hold those negotiations ultimately lies with the UN General Assembly.Karan called for the General Assembly to move the process along quickly: “After two years of meetings, the General Assembly must now decide to launch formal diplomatic negotiations as soon as possible so that countries can work towards finalizing a treaty that would protect the high seas starting in 2018.”Clouds over the Atlantic Ocean. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONRoberts, C. M., O’Leary, B. C., McCauley, D. J., Cury, P. M., Duarte, C. M., Lubchenco, J., … & Worm, B. (2017). Marine reserves can mitigate and promote adaptation to climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(24), 6167-6175. doi:10.1073/pnas.1701262114Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

A lingering ‘legacy’: Deforestation warms climate more than expected

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Carbon Emissions, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Climate Change Policy, Climate Modeling, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Food, Forest Carbon, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Governance, Impact Of Climate Change, Land Use Change, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Tropical deforestation results in the release of not only carbon dioxide but also methane and nitrous oxide, leading to greater-than-anticipated warming of the global climate.The study compared emissions from land conversion with those from burning fossil fuels for energy and other sources.The researchers found that tropical deforestation at current rates could cause a 1.5-degree Celsius rise in global temperatures by 2100. Scientists know that the carbon released by large-scale deforestation in the tropics inevitably helps boost global temperatures. Now, new research indicates that this conversion of land, often to farms and ranches to produce food for people, has a bigger impact on the climate than anticipated.“Normally people only think about what’s happening right now when they think about the carbon budget,” said Natalie Mahowald, a climatologist at Cornell University and lead author of the study, in a statement. “But if you think about what’s going to happen over the lifetime of that land, long into the future, you should multiply that land conversion by two to understand the net effect of it.”Land in Guatemala that has been deforested for cattle ranching. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayOnly about 20 percent of the carbon dioxide that’s been added to the atmosphere comes from clearing forests. But this “land use and land cover change” is responsible for 40 percent of the warming of the planet. In part, that’s because carbon isn’t the only climate-warming culprit that these spots continue to emit. The research, published online in August by the journal Environmental Research Letters, demonstrates the lingering impact of the accompanying release of methane and nitrous oxide from deforested land.One of the goals laid out in the Paris climate accord signed in 2015 is to keep the global temperature rise to under 2 degrees Celsius by the end of this century. Much of the current effort to meet this goal involves cutting the use of carbon-based fossil fuels in favor of sustainable alternatives. Mahowald and her colleagues agree with that approach, writing that curbing emissions from these sources of energy should be “the primary target.”“It’s an incredibly important step to take, but, ironically, particulates released from the burning of fossil fuels — which are severely detrimental to human health — have a cooling effect on the climate,” she said. “Removing those particulates actually makes it harder to reach the lower temperatures laid out in the Paris agreement.”That complication points to the need to combat climate change by dealing with the often-underestimated consequences of deforestation.The study shows that tropical deforestation, pictured here in Peru around a gold mining site, impacts climate warming more than once thought. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayEarlier this year, Mahowald and her team confirmed that losing forests, which serve as storehouses of carbon, compounds the effects on climate from these sorts of land-use decisions. In the current study, the team modeled how the global temperature will change based on current rates of deforestation in the tropics. They then compared these findings with temperature changes that would occur only as a result of other sources of carbon emissions, the bulk of which come from burning fossil fuels to generate energy.The results don’t bode well for our ability to meet climate targets. Continued deforestation at the rates we’re seeing today will likely lead to a 1.5-degree-Celsius increase over what temperatures were before the Industrial Revolution by 2100. In fact, they found that such a temperature bump would likely occur even if we had slashed all other sources of emissions back in 2015, the researchers found.Slash-and-burn land clearance in the Democratic Republic of Congo for agriculture. Photo by John C. CannonThis scenario could lead to a higher risk of extreme weather, declines in crop yields and more droughts. But those dangers would increase substantially if we let temperatures creep up to 2 degrees over pre-industrial levels, according to several scientists in the journal Nature Climate Change.Mahowald and her colleagues conclude that policies aimed at tackling climate change should address deforestation as a major source of carbon, especially as demand for larger areas of land for food production increases in the tropics. In particular, policies should be focused on the long term, taking into account what Mahowald calls the “multi-centennial legacy of current land-use decisions.”“When we think about climate change, we can’t stop at the end of the century,” she said in the statement. “The consequences keep going for a couple more centuries.”CITATIONS:Mahowald, N. M., Randerson, J. T., Lindsay, K., Munoz, E., Doney, S. C., Lawrence, P., … & Hoffman, F. M. (2017). Interactions between land use change and carbon cycle feedbacks. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 31(1), 96-113.Mahowald, N. M., Ward, D., Doney, S., Hess, P., & Randerson, J. T. (2017). Are the impacts of land use on warming underestimated in climate policy? Environmental Research Letters.Mitchell, D., James, R., Forster, P. M., Betts, R. A., Shiogama, H., & Allen, M. (2016). Realizing the impacts of a 1.5 [deg] C warmer world. Nature Climate Change, 6(8), 735-737.Banner image of deforestation in Malaysian Borneo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonlast_img read more

Belo Monte dam installation license suspended, housing inadequacy cited

first_imgAmazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, China And Energy, China’s Demand For Resources, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Flooding, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Sedimentation, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherer A federal court has suspended the installation license of the Belo Monte mega-dam in the state of Pará, Brazil. The dam, slated to have the world’s third-largest generating capacity, became operational in 2015, but won’t see construction finished until 2019.The court ordered further construction halted until Norte Energia met the commitments it made in 2011 to provide adequate housing for those displaced by the dam, including indigenous and traditional people that had been living along the Xingu River.Among commitment violations cited were houses built without space for larger families, houses built from different materials than promised, and homes constructed too far from work, schools and shopping in Altamira, a city lacking a robust public transportation system.The consortium continues to operate the dam, as its operating license has not been suspended. Among the displaced: Tamawaerw Paracanã and her family were resettled from their traditional Xingu Riveriver community to the city of Altamira when Belo Monte was built. She earns a small income from the crafts she makes and sells. Her husband has been unable to find work in the economically depressed city. Inadequate public transportation makes reaching the city center difficult and costly. Photo by Zoe SullivanA federal court in Brasilia has found fault with Norte Energia´s resettlement of people displaced by the Belo Monte dam in the Amazonian state of Pará. The court ruled in favor of the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), a body of independent prosecutors, which argued that the urban resettlement plans for the thousands displaced by the dam were inadequate.The new ruling suspends Norte Energia´s installation license, blocking the consortium from proceeding with further construction on the dam, slated for completion in 2019. The Belo Monte hydroelectric facility has been operational since early 2015.According to the suit, Norte Energia promised in 2011 to build three-different sized houses for displaced families (60, 69 and 78 square meters), allocating them according to the size of resettled families. But in 2013, the firm reneged, saying it would only build one size house of 63 square meters. This decision, according to the ruling, was made without consulting the people affected, many of them indigenous and traditional people who had lived along the Xingu River.A small portion of one of the resettlement communities in Altamira as seem from space. Norte Energia has been accused by the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) of ethnocide for its wholesale destruction of indigenous culture. Riverside indigenous and traditional community residents were resettled into urban tract housing units without easy access to traditional livelihoods such as fishing. Image courtesy of GoogleEarthAnother change involved opting to build the houses from cement blocks instead of brick as originally promised. While this may seem a minor alteration, it meant that sleeping hammocks, traditional in the Amazon, could not be supported by the block walls.An additional problem cited is that the resettlement communities were located more than 2 kilometers away from the residents´ original homes, a serious problem since there is little public transit available in the city of Altamira. During this journalist´s visit to Altamira resettlement communities in 2016, motorcycle taxis were the only reliable method of transportation to work, school and shopping. However, these taxis charge higher rates than most city buses in Brazil, causing a financial hardship for the many displaced people without jobs. The taxis also restrict who can travel — since there are no allowances for the differently abled — as well as the items a passenger can carry.Additionally, the MPF found that the houses proposed by Norte Energia violated the Altamira municipality Construction Code. Instead of demanding the consortium meet the existing code, however, the city council approved a code amendment in order to adapt it to the Norte Energia projects. The MPF contended that the sudden change by the city council was unconstitutional.The Belo Monte dam, built in the heart of the Amazon, displaced somewhere between 20,000 and 40,000 people, including Altamira residents, indigenous people, and traditional fisherfolk. All were supposed to be compensated for their losses by the Norte Energia Consortium. Photo by Zoe SullivanThe Belo Monte dam was built to have the third-largest hydroelectric generating capacity in the world. It is located on Brazil´s Xingu River near the city of Altamira. The Norte Energia consortium that built the dam signed an agreement with the Brazilian government in 2011 promising to pay US$ 1 billion in compensation to those affected by its construction, including displaced indigenous and traditional people. An NGO, the Movement of Those Affected by Dams (MAB) estimates that some 40,000 people were displaced by the dam. However, Norte Energia´s Environmental Impact Study estimated that only about half that number would be affected.The dam’s construction resulted in a rush from across Brazil to the city by job seekers and those with businesses supporting them. As dam construction work continues to wind down, unemployment has rapidly escalated. Altamira today ranks as the most violent city in Brazil according to the 2017 Atlas of Violence.Over the past year, Norte Energia´s license has been suspended because of its failure to fulfill the terms of its operating agreement, especially the building of an adequate sewer and water system for the city of Altamira where most of the displaced have been relocated.The reduction in river flow resulting from the dam´s installation has also negatively affected indigenous people and traditional fishing communities, which depended on the abundance of the Xingu’s fish for sustenance and cash income. Major fish kills have occurred since the dam’s construction, for which Norte Energia was fined US $10.8 million. In 2015, the MPF charged the consortium and federal government with ethnocide, the destruction of indigenous culture, due to its failure to meet its commitments to indigenous people displaced by the project.A tree submerged by the Belo Monte reservoir still shows above the water’s surface. The dam not only forced resettlement of riverine communities, but has also done major harm to the Xingu River fishery. Photo by Zoe SullivanWhile the new ruling impedes Norte Energia from continuing work to expand the hydroelectric project, the dam has been operational since early 2015. In a press statement, Norte Energia said it had not yet been notified of the decision. O Globo´s national television news noted on September 15th that the dam continues to operate. Norte Energia’s statement maintains that it has an operating license that supersedes the installation license that the court suspended, and so there are no practical impacts for the firm resulting from the suspension. The release noted that Norte Energia will appeal.Attorney Biviany Rojas Garzon was indignant that the company would brush off the ruling in this way. Rojas Garzon works with the Socio-Environmental Institute’s Xingu River program. “The idea that this decision is innocuous is false,” she told Mongabay. “The rights of the people who have been affected by this dam are still valid, and they don’t expire. The [consortium’s] obligation to the people who were expelled from their homes remains.”Rojas Garzon also expressed concern that the dam may be purchased by Chinese investors, given the lackluster reputation China has on human rights issues. Reuters reported in April that the Belo Monte dam ownership was in talks with the Zhejiang Electric Power Construction company (ZEPC). News of a potential sale emerged after Brazilian President Michel Temer travelled to China. By July, however, Reuters reported that talks around a potential sale had cooled in part because of the dam’s legal issues.Belo Monte’s current owners include Eletrobras, Brazil’s state-owned power company; Vale, the Brazilian mining giant; Neoenergia SA, Cemig and Light SA; and pension funds Petros and Funcef. The operation is valued at 35 billion Reals, but a source told Reuters that the risks and uncertainties involved in the project could be a “deal-breaker.” The hydropower dam is also involved with an administrative case brought by ANEEL, Brazil’s electrical agency, because it began producing power behind schedule.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The Xingu River at Altamira. Rural indigenous and traditional people living on the river were uprooted by the construction of the Belo Monte dam. Photo by Analita Freitas Duarte licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licensecenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

$100 million dollar fund launched to secure indigenous land rights

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new $100 million initiative will help indigenous peoples and local communities in rural areas secure rights to their traditional lands.The International Land and Forest Tenure Facility, formally launched launched week, was conceived by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI)The Tenure Facility is a mechanism for scaling up recognition of rights to collective lands and forests.The tenure facility aims to secure at least 40 million hectares of forests and rural lands for local and indigenous communities. A new $100 million initiative will help indigenous peoples and local communities in rural areas secure rights to their traditional lands.The International Land and Forest Tenure Facility, formally launched launched week, was conceived by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) in 2010 as a mechanism for scaling up recognition of rights to collective lands and forests. After four years of design and consultation, the Tenure Facility operated six pilot projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America before formally launching October 3 with the support of the Ford Foundation, the Norwegian and Swedish governments, the Climate and Land Use Alliance and Acacia. The tenure facility will now invest at least $10 million a year for ten years, with an aim to secure at least 40 million hectares of forests and rural lands for local and indigenous communities.“Inequality is the greatest challenge of our time and we can measure its detrimental effects on the economic, social and environmental progress across the globe,” said Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, in a press release. “Strengthening and enforcing the rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to manage their own forests and lands rebalances the equation. By focusing on this issue the global community has the ability to address climate change and entrenched poverty, promote sustainable development, and even achieve a lasting peace in places suffering some of the world’s most unrelenting conflicts.”According to the Tenure Facility’s backers, if the initiative hits its 40 million hectare target, it will prevent the loss of one million hectares of forests and avoid the emissions of more than 500 million tons of carbon dioxide. But the potential to help mitigate climate change is far greater given that roughly a quarter of the 54.5 billion tons of above ground carbon stored in the world’s tropical forests lies within “collectively managed territories” of indigenous peoples and local communities. A growing body of research shows that territories managed by traditional and indigenous peoples have lower deforestation and degradation rates than adjacent areas, suggesting that securing rights to these lands for these peoples can be an effective climate change intervention.“Research shows time and time again that Indigenous Peoples are the best stewards of their lands, and have been tirelessly maintaining the resources we all depend on for centuries,” said Nonette Royo, the Tenure Facility’s new executive director, in a statement.Local people on a river in Acre, Brazil. Photo credit: Guto de Lima via Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA“Indigenous Peoples and local communities offer a sustainable solution to saving the world’s forests.” added Carin Jämtin, director general of the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). “The Tenure Facility gives these often-unsung forest stewards an opportunity to partner with governments to secure and protect their forests. The new organization provides a powerful solution to save the world’s forests from the ground up—keeping a lid on the carbon they contain and sheltering the communities they support.”Underscoring the importance of the initiative, on the same day the Tenure Facility officially launched, RRI published a report showing that the most common cause of land conflicts in Southeast Asia “is when companies and governments force communities from their customary lands to make way for private investments in land-based sectors like agriculture, mining, forestry and hydroelectric power”“These conflicts occur in all types of economic developments—from palm oil plantations in Indonesia, to sugar plantations in Cambodia, to energy projects in Myanmar,” said RRI.Photo credit: CIFOR via Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-NDChief Raoni of the Caiapo tribe from the Amazon basin smokes a pipe while demonstrating against the construction of the planned Belo Monte hydroelectric dam, in Brasilia February 8, 2011. Proposed to be built along the Xingu River in the state of Para, the dam would be the world’s third largest at planned capacity, though environmentalists and native Brazilians have raised concerns that the project may displace indigenous tribes and damage the environment. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino. Photo credit: International Rivers via Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-SACitation:Rights and Resources Initiative. Tenure and Investment in Southeast Asia Published October 3, 2017.center_img Conservation, Conservation Finance, Environment, Green, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Rights, Resource Conflict last_img read more

Going the extra mile (Insider)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored UK-based environmental journalist James Fair knows from personal experience just how unpredictable working in the field can be.After years of reporting on wildlife conservation projects for BBC Wildlife Magazine, Fair is deeply familiar with the many dangers faced by biologists, ecologists and zoologists in their work.Two decades ago after a fall and ankle injury while working in Bolivia, Fair half-crawled nearly three miles to get help. One fine day in late November in 1998, while standing on a knife-edged, precipitous ridge some 3,500 meters (11,500 feet) above sea level in Bolivia’s Cordillera Apolobamba, I came across a veritable latrine of sweet-smelling bear scat. I took out a couple of clear plastic bags from my small blue rucksack, and carefully placed the… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists. Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Environment, Environmental Journalism, Insider, Journalism, Science last_img read more

Climate change threatens some island conifers with extinction

first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar Climate Change, Conservation, Ecosystems, Environment, Impact Of Climate Change, Interns, Islands, Plants, Research Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A quarter of 55 conifer species native to islands are likely to go extinct by 2070 due to climate change, researchers from Brown University write in a new study.The researchers looked at where these species are living and thriving outside their native climatic ranges, to study their climatic tolerance in a more comprehensive way.Island conifers are keystone species, playing a vital part in maintaining the ecosystem and ensuring the survival of other species that depend on them.If the conifers in an ecosystem go extinct, the entire nature and composition of species found in that place could change dramatically. Pines, firs, junipers, cedars — the world’s magnificent conifers have adapted to survive in unique landscapes and adverse environments, from snowy mountains and drought-ridden lowlands, to small, lonely islands.But some of these same island conifers, known to require little maintenance once established, may now be on the road to extinction due to climate change.Researchers from Brown University in the U.S. found that several conifers native to small islands across the globe are likely to become extinct by 2070, even in better-case scenarios. Their study, published in Nature Climate Change, shows that the risk of extinction increases rapidly on islands smaller than 20,000 square kilometers (7,700 square miles) — the size of Massachusetts’ land area.“Our work shows that species native to relatively small islands are in a lot of danger from climate change, and relatively soon,” study co-author Dov Sax, deputy director of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, said in a statement.Studying 55 island species of fir, cedar and pine, Sax and colleagues discovered that a quarter of them likely face extinction due to global warming, based on forecasts from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC).Understanding climatic effectsConifers are an ancient group of trees in the class Pinophyta, and many species have survived significant climate changes previously. Indeed, conifers are known to survive, sometimes even thrive, in various climatic conditions, but the current pace of climate change may be too much for several species.The critically endangered Bermuda cedar (Juniperus bermudiana) is a vital part of its native ecosystem. It is being pushed out of its tolerance niche in Bermuda and likely won’t survive for long on the island. Image by Malcolm Manners via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).Sax and his team chose to go against the traditional way of assessing risk, which is to look at a species’ native climatic range, assume that’s only what the species can withstand, and look for ways to conserve the species in its habitat. Instead, they collected information on where these conifer species are living and thriving outside their native climatic ranges, because conifers are popular among gardeners and landscapers worldwide, often outside their native habitats.“This is important because it means that it’s easier to study the climatic tolerance of these species in a more comprehensive way,” Sax says.Using the data they collected from parks and gardens, researchers made up three climate niches for all species: the realized, the fundamental, and the tolerance niche.The realized niche represents the native climatic range of the species where the trees can maintain a healthy population. The fundamental niche includes the climatic conditions where the species can reproduce enough to only just sustain a population. Finally, the tolerance niche is where the trees can survive, but not reproduce enough to sustain a population. The realized niche would have the healthiest populations, while the tolerance niche would eventually lead to the species’ extinction.Categorizing each species into these niches helped the scientists decide the next steps for conservation. They juxtaposed the niches with IPCC predictions to determine how close each species is to extinction.The Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla) will be facing climatic conditions between its fundamental niche and tolerance niche, and should survive with some human intervention. Image by Zigzig20s via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).The study highlighted three conifers: the Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis), the Bermuda cedar (Juniperus bermudiana), and the Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla). The scientists say they expect the Canary Island pine to remain secure in its fundamental niche. The Bermuda cedar, on the other hand, is already being pushed out of its tolerance niche, which means it will likely not survive for long on its native island of Bermuda. The Norfolk Island pine, from the South Pacific, will potentially face climatic conditions that are somewhere in between its fundamental niche and tolerance niche. In this case, with some human intervention, the reproduction of these pines can be maintained to keep them from being pushed to extinction.Most conifers, especially island ones, are keystone species in their ecosystems: they play a vital part in maintaining the ecosystem, and the survival of other species depends on them. If the conifers in an ecosystem go extinct, the entire nature and composition of species found in that place could change dramatically.The Canary Island pine (Pinus canariensis), seen here in Tenerife, is in a better position compared to the Bermuda cedar and Norfolk Island pine. Image by Dov Sax.Remote conservation chancesPreserving habitats, removing introduced pests, or anything that can be done to combat climate change could help conserve these species in the wild. Sax says that more elaborate irrigation strategies might be considered in some extreme cases, although this is unlikely to be a long-term plan.A potential solution is ex situ or captive conservation, according to researchers. These trees don’t have to remain insular species. Sax says breeding the trees in botanical gardens and parks away from their native habitats is far from the perfect conservation strategy. However, he says it may be an important step to take to keep some species from total extinction.There are ways the trees may find new habitat other than by intentional translocation of selected species. Study co-author Kyle Rosenblad, a research student in Sax’s lab, says there will be many cases of what he calls “unmanaged relocation” in the next few decades. This occurs when a species that is cultivated in a new area escapes into the wild and produces a new “insurance population” that could survive climate change. Rosenblad points to the Bermuda cedar as an example.“The species is currently capable of surviving on Bermuda but probably cannot thrive in the wild at a cooler, higher latitude location like Maine. However, as both Maine and Bermuda get warmer over the next few decades, Bermuda may eventually become too hot, but, by then, the conditions in Maine could be just right,” he says.With the help of human intervention to help with reproduction or translocation, some conifer species can be kept from becoming extinct. This photo shows new growth on a rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum) sapling, Stewart Island, New Zealand. Image by Kyle Rosenblad.Many conservation biologists are already talking about translocating species intentionally. Meanwhile humans couldn’t stop some cultivated plants from escaping into the wild even if we wanted to.“It may make sense to regard these unmanaged relocation events as no-cost conservation tools,” Rosenblad says.This means that we will have to keep an eye on non-native species that may turn out to be harmfully invasive, either through ecological health or economic harm.“However, given that escape events are going to happen anyway, it will make sense to monitor their progression, and to devote limited control resources only to those populations that are actually becoming invasive,” Rosenblad says.Losing conifers and changing ecosystemsConifers are not just keystone species, but umbrella species as well. If protected, they can help to extend protection to other, less charismatic species. As the climate changes everywhere, certain species may shift to take up space in new, suitable environments, as in the case of the Bermuda cedar. This may consequently lead some of the smaller dependent species to shift, too.“Climate change is likely to have a pervasive impact on the world’s species. The fact that conifers will be impacted by changes in climate should help people to realize how pervasive this threat is to biodiversity,” Sax says.Kyle Rosenblad standing with a mature rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum), Stewart Island, New Zealand. Image by Patrick Behrer.Citation:Rosenblad, K. C., Perret, D. L., & Sax, D. F. (2019). Niche syndromes reveal climate-driven extinction threat to island endemic conifers. Nature Climate Change, 9(8), 627-631. doi:10.1038/s41558-019-0530-9This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  last_img read more

Avoiding climate apartheid in East Africa (commentary)

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Global Warming, Researcher Perspective Series This summer, the United Nations Human Rights Council published a warning about a not-so-distant dystopia: the rich will pay to dodge the worst impacts of climate change, and the poor will be left to deal with overheating, resource scarcity, and rising rights violations.In the east of Africa, the continent most susceptible to a changing climate, an oil boom offers an uncomfortable glimpse into this future shaped by a class-based climate apartheid. Hundreds of families — mainly subsistence farmers — have been forced, sometimes violently, from their land to make room for the access roads and feeder pipelines that now zig-zag around the Albertine basin.Companies, governments, and investors should reconsider their approach, especially if new oil projects come online.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. This summer, the United Nations Human Rights Council published a warning about a not-so-distant dystopia: the rich will pay to dodge the worst impacts of climate change, and the poor will be left to deal with overheating, resource scarcity, and rising rights violations.Sound like science fiction? Not really, because it is already a reality for many living in poverty from hurricane-prone Florida to record-hot France.In the east of Africa, the continent most susceptible to a changing climate, an oil boom offers an uncomfortable glimpse into this future shaped by a class-based climate apartheid. Commercially-viable crude was discovered under Uganda’s Lake Albert over a decade ago, turning the area into one of the world’s top exploration hotspots. But while oil fever may have brought welcome investment, it also brought disruption. Hundreds of families — mainly subsistence farmers — have been forced from their land, sometimes violently, to make room for the access roads and feeder pipelines that now zig-zag around the Albertine basin.Malachite Kingfisher in Uganda. Photo by Andrew Bogrand (Oxfam).Companies, governments, and investors should reconsider their approach, especially if new oil projects come online.A handful of these families now live in the Kyakaboga resettlement camp outside of Hoima, the capital of Uganda’s oil frontier. Legal headaches and building delays have left many without housing for years. To make matters worse, residents claim their new plots of land are too cramped and removed from markets to be viable for crops or livestock.For families that rely on their ability to produce their own food, this comes with serious ramifications. Like other farmers across Uganda, residents of Kyakaboga are also wrestling with rising temperatures and prolonged droughts, but with less resources than before and on land that the farmers claim is less productive. The majority may simply not be able to cope.Activists who ask too many questions about Kyakaboga face threats and harassment, amid broader patterns of civic repression across East Africa. Civil society groups in Uganda claim they are not freely able to visit villages affected by oil projects and consultations about oil development are often perfunctory rather than participatory. Those living in poverty on the environmental precipice are simultaneously stuck in democratic fractures.Community activist at the Kyakaboga resettlement community. Photo by Andrew Bogrand (Oxfam).The scramble for crude in East Africa threatens human rights and risks leaving communities segregated, silenced, and less able to mitigate climate emergencies, including a serious, ongoing drought.Although families across the region are already navigating more severe weather patterns, this cannot be blamed on the Albertine crude itself — at least not yet. The fossil fuel industry accounts for roughly 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, but Uganda’s oil remains landlocked, pending construction of the proposed East Africa Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP). Inland exploration has been disruptive but not yet profitable.It is unclear when the oil will start to flow to international markets. Work on the pipeline, which would extend from Lake Albert, around Lake Victoria, to Tanga port in Tanzania, was recently suspended. If completed, the project would become the world’s longest heated pipeline in one of the most ecologically diverse regions in Africa. The pipeline would threaten a variety of species, including elephants, and would likely undermine the region’s tourism sector. Moreover, construction would require even more families to vacate their houses and farms.Despite the risks, officials are looking to salvage the project, especially given its political importance to government leaders. Following the suspension this September, President Museveni promised oil production within two years. This work hiatus can provide time and space to take a different path.African elephant in Uganda. Photo by Andrew Bogrand (Oxfam).At a minimum, a different path means pushing for democratic participation and recognizing the value of decisions informed by local knowledge and demands. It also means recognizing the real threats to economic justice, rights, and health. Compensation and resettlement processes can be hijacked by those with access and money looking to profit from speculative land buying. At the very worst, an oil spill near Lake Victoria would prove disastrous for the millions that rely on its watershed.If governments, companies, and investors proceed with business as usual, families along the EACOP route will likely face rights violations, food scarcity, and a fate similar to those now living in Kyakaboga. Instead, corporate and political power brokers in East Africa — and further afield — must try to open all political avenues for people to shape their environmental trajectory, or, at the very least, escape climate catastrophe. Expedited, top-down decision-making on pipelines and development projects without concern for local realities will prove costly for all of us.What is bad for democracy is also bad, if not worse, for the climate. Human rights advocates everywhere need to start linking their work to climate activism and companies need to get serious about the human cost of their environmental legacies. If Kyakaboga offers any lesson, sidestepping participation and silencing civic voices, particularly in poor communities, will only push us further down the path to climate apartheid.Fishing community on Lake Albert near Albertine oil discovery. Photo by Andrew Bogrand (Oxfam).Andrew Bogrand is a Senior Communications Advisor at Oxfam America.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Breaking down barriers: Cattle and wildlife compete in Southern Africa

first_imgThousands of kilometers of fencing designed to keep cattle away from disease-carrying wildlife such as buffalo now cover many parts of sub-Saharan Africa.These disease-control fences have a devastating impact on wildlife by blocking migration routes and isolating populations.Global food safety rules that require that beef be produced in areas free of disease such as foot-and-mouth disease have historically made it difficult for regions with wildlife populations to trade in beef.Southern African nations are exploring a new approach to trade that may reduce the reliance on fences, in the process also allowing key migration routes to be restored. The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) is an audacious project that envisions a vast space where migrating species can cross international borders following their ancient seasonal paths. But there’s a problem.“One of the key barriers to connected landscapes in many parts of Southern Africa are disease control fences,” says Steve Osofsky, a professor of wildlife health and health policy at Cornell University.An area north of the Okavango Delta panhandle in northwest Botswana illustrates the problem. Here, around 18,000 elephants are hemmed into a roughly triangular pocket of some 8,700 square kilometers (3,360 square miles), isolated from the rest of KAZA to the north and east by disease-control fences, and the waters of the Okavango River and villages to the south and west. The area is also home to 13 villages with a population of more than 16,000 people enclosed alongside the elephants, creating a pressure cooker for human-wildlife conflict.“When you’ve got that many elephants bottled up, that’s one of the most conflict intense areas of the country,” Osofsky says.Mod Masedi, the son of the chief of Habu village in the southern part of the delta, says the conflict has been exacerbated by climate change, with elephants destroying boreholes and water pumps in search of water.“I think it’s getting worse, we haven’t had rain the whole of last year, the whole of the delta is dried up,” he says. “We can’t blame [the elephants], they are also looking for water.”The disease-control fences also prevent elephants and other migratory species from accessing the different habitats they historically used at different times of the year. Eyewitnesses have described thousands of animals helplessly trapped mid-migration, cut off from the food and water they had traveled so far to reach.“It’s pretty well documented that hundreds of thousands if not millions of wild animals have died since those fences started to go up in the late 1950s,” Osofsky says.Disease-control fences are part of an ingrained orthodoxy of the livestock trade that has dominated since the colonial era. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), an infectious virus that affects cloven-hooved animals, is one of the main reasons for disease control fences. The disease is not dangerous to humans but can be fatal in cattle, producing a high fever and sores on the hooves and mouth. An outbreak in the UK in 2001 led to more than 6 million cattle and sheep being culled at an estimated cost of 8 billion pounds ($11.6 billion).The thousands of kilometers of disease-control fences that now segment much of Southern Africa are designed to separate livestock from wildlife, particularly the Cape or African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).Cape buffalo, Kasane, Botswana. Image by Federico Moroni via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)“The African buffalo is the only wildlife species in the world we know that naturally carries FMD virus,” Osofsky says. “The only way to eradicate the virus in a country with buffalo is to kill all the buffalo which would be a tragedy.”When properly maintained and coupled with a vaccination program, disease-control fences can create largely wildlife-free zones that are FMD–free, such as in southern Botswana, where the country’s commercial cattle operations are concentrated. These FMD-free zones are able to export their beef around the world and access high-value markets — so long as they remain FMD-free.The livestock sector in wildlife regions like the northern Botswanan section of KAZA differs from the large, profitable commercial herds found in southern Botswana. Frequent FMD outbreaks in these regions have historically disrupted trade for long periods of time.“The worst scenario was in 2007 when we had the first outbreak in the quarantine,” Masedi says. “After that people never sold their cattle for seven years. That means people lost income, their livelihoods, and also because of overpopulation of cattle because of not selling we ended up with a lot of environmental degradation.”Under these conditions, the cattle industry in the Ngamiland region of northern Botswana has stagnated for many years.“FMD has actually completely eroded the social and economic status of Ngamiland people,” Masedi says. “At some point Ngamiland used to be one of the richest areas [but] because of the FMD we have not been able to access the markets and as such we ended up with now becoming the second poorest in Botswana.”In countries like Botswana, cattle are culturally important as status symbols, so disease control fences are still a politically sensitive issue in the north of the country.But the fences designed to protect the ailing livestock sector are paradoxically suffocating the region’s main economic potential: nature-based tourism. In Botswana, travel and tourism now account for 13.4 percent of GDP, second only to the diamond trade, with wildlife being Botswana’s greatest tourism asset. By contrast, the agricultural sector, which includes arable crops, fishing and forestry as well as livestock, has fallen from 44 percent of GDP in 1968 to just 2 percent of GDP in 2018.Communities living alongside wildlife in Southern Africa are also often the poorest, with limited job opportunities. Climate change is likely to exacerbate the already challenging agricultural environment. Osofsky says he believes that ecotourism is an essential part of the diversified income streams that communities living in KAZA will need to be sustainable, so finding a way for livestock and wildlife to co-exist is imperative to KAZA’s success.The Setata Fence was built in 1995 to prevent disease migrating from wild animals to domestic cattle. Because of its impact on migrating wildlife, it was taken down in 2004, only to be rebuilt in 2008. Image by Terry Feuerborn via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)Commodity-based tradeThe governments of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) nations, with the support of the KAZA Secretariat, have been exploring a different approach to protecting the beef trade.Osofsky began his search for a new approach after he witnessed the land-use conflicts firsthand whilst serving as the inaugural wildlife veterinary officer for Botswana’s Department for Wildlife and National Parks in the early 1990s. His approach has been to create spaces where the wildlife and livestock sectors can work together.“The science is in many ways the easy part,” Osofsky says, “the hard part is getting different sectors to acknowledge that they are talking about the same land base so they’re going to have to work together.”Osofsky and his colleagues at the Animal & Human Health for the Environment And Development (AHEAD) program proposed adopting an alternative approach to FMD risk management that would focus on the safety of beef products rather than the disease status of their geographic origin. If beef is processed correctly, the risk of FMD virus transmission can be reduced to acceptable levels. Even fresh chilled meat can be considered safe if it has been processed correctly.The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), which sets the international guidelines for the management and movement of animals and animal products for disease control, has long accepted the safety of processed beef, but with a number of caveats, such as a minimum of two vaccinations, use of an approved abattoir, and inspections for the presence of FMD 24 hours before and after slaughter.This was feasible for northern Botswana, but there was one OIE guideline that was problematic for KAZA’s farmers: the animal must not have been within a 10–kilometer (6-mile) radius of an FMD-infected animal for 30 days before slaughter. With wild buffalo and other wildlife roaming, this was simply impossible for government veterinarians in KAZA to say with any certainty.The AHEAD program’s proposed approach, known as commodity-based trade (CBT), has been gaining traction with the governments of SADC nations. In 2015, SADC successfully lobbied the OIE to change the guidelines to allow animals to be kept in a quarantine station for 30 days before slaughter as an alternative to requiring the 10-kilometer radius free from an FMD-infected animal.This seemingly small change along with an increased acceptance of trade between regions with an infected FMD status has given beef farmers in regions such as KAZA potential access to the rapidly expanding middle-class market in neighboring African nations, the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Letlhogile Modisa, director of Botswana’s veterinary services, says a CBT approach will also reduce the impact of FMD in the region; quarantine periods after an outbreak have been reduced from six months to 30 days, for example.“CBT is very beneficial because one is looking at the safety of the product rather than the geographical distribution of the affected area,” Modisa says. “Trade is going to be more or less continuous and we are trading in safer commodities.”But CBT is far from a guarantee of success for the beef trade in KAZA. Two papers modeling the economic potential of CBT in Namibia and Ethiopia suggest that the approach may be more challenging in reality, with the additional costs associated with compliance eroding the benefits of access to higher-value markets.After stagnating for so long, the beef industry in regions such as northern Botswana is a long way from being at full strength. AHEAD has identified a number of issues in the way herds are managed, grazed, and slaughtered and processed.A farmer with his bull at Kalakamati, Botswana. Image by Mompati Dikunwane via Wikicommons (CC BY-SA 4.0)Even then, KAZA’s farmers are unlikely to reach the standards required for the highest-value export markets. They will face tough competition from other low-cost beef producers like Brazil, and the EU is unlikely to ever accept beef from an FMD-infected zone.For Osofsky, that’s not a problem. CBT was never meant to turn KAZA into a major beef producer; instead, AHEAD’s intention has always been to make the sector a sustainable part of a holistic approach to land management in wildlife-rich regions such as KAZA to help alleviate poverty.“The attitude of pitting livestock against wildlife is really entrenched, so it’s really been a pleasure in the last few years to see those divisions melting away and, in some cases, see earnest collaboration,” he says.For the first time in many years, there is serious consideration in the KAZA region about the role and impact of fences. Fences will always play a role here, and some of the initially reviled disease-control fences are now even supported by conservationists as they have become a barrier to livestock encroachment. There is no question of removing all the fences, but Osofsky and his colleagues argue that the realignment or removal of certain key stretches would have a big impact.One such stretch runs along the border between Namibia and Botswana, forming the northern boundary of the enclosed pocket above the Okavango Delta panhandle. Removing this fence would allow elephants to move across their traditional migration pathways between the dry and wet seasons. It would also allow them to leave areas of high human-wildlife conflict and repopulate areas inside Angola, where poaching has decimated local populations.A lot of work will be required from the KAZA countries before this vision can become a reality, in particular tackling the poaching crisis in southern Angola. If this can be done, Osofsky says he’s hopeful that a healthy beef industry can co-exist alongside a thriving ecotourism sector, and the economic vision of KAZA as a poverty-alleviation tool as well as conservation area can be realized.“KAZA countries are looking for tourism success,” he says, “but they can’t do that unless [they] increase security for wildlife and restore key migratory paths that had existed long before fences started to go up.”Citations:Cumming, D. H., Osofsky, S. A., Atkinson, S. J., & Atkinson, M. W. (2015). Beyond fences: wildlife, livestock and land use in Southern Africa. One Health: The theory and practice of integrated health approaches, 243-257. doi:10.1079/9781780643410.0243Rich, K. M., Perry, B. D., & Kaitibie, S. (2009). Commodity-based trade and market access for developing country livestock products: The case of beef exports from Ethiopia. International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, 12(3), 1-22. doi:10.22004/ag.econ.53794Rich, K. M., & Perry, B. D. (2011). Whither commodity-based trade? Development Policy Review, 29(3), 331-357. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7679.2011.00536.xNaziri, D., Rich, K. M., & Bennett, B. (2015). Would a commodity-based trade approach improve market access for Africa? A case study of the potential of beef exports from communal areas of Namibia. Development Policy Review, 33(2), 195-219. doi:10.1111/dpr.12098 Article published by terna gyuse Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Correction 12/12/19: The name of the chief of Habu village’s son was incorrectly given as Mod Modisa. His name is Mod Masedi.Banner image: Cattle in the Okavango Delta. Image by Diego Delso via Wikicommons (CC BY-SA 4.0) Animals, Beef, Cattle, Diseases, Elephants, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fences, Human-wildlife Conflict, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Mammals, Migration, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors last_img read more

Amazon’s Munduruku stage daring Christmas raid to recover sacred urns

first_imgIn 2013, during the building of the Teles Pires dam in the Brazilian Amazon, the Teles Pires Hydroelectric Company (CHTP) dynamited Karobixexe (Seven Rapids), a sacred site of the Munduruku, Apiaká and Kayabi peoples. Located just outside an indigenous reserve, it received no government protection.Also during construction, the firm removed funeral urns from a sacred site without indigenous permission and refused to return them. In December, 70 Munduruku occupied the Natural History Museum in Alta Floresta in Mato Grosso state, and took back the 12 funeral urns, plus other artifacts of theirs.The construction of the Teles Pires dam and destruction of Karobixexe both occurred without prior consultation of the Mundurku as required under law according to the International Labor Organization’s Convention 169, of which Brazil is a signatory.Other human remains were found by CHTP and 270,000 artifacts were removed to which the Munduruku now have no access. They have also been barred from another sacred site, Dekoka’a (Monkey Hill) impacted by the construction of the São Manoel Hydroelectric Power Station, also located on the Teles Pires River. Indigenous protest on the Teles Pires River, December, 2019. The sign held by two Munduruku reads: “We are made of sacred things, Karobixexe [Seven Rapids] and Dekoka’a [Monkey Hill] [are destroyed]. We are mourning.” Image by Karoribe Munduruku.ALTA FLORESTA, Mato Grosso state, Brazil — On Christmas Eve 2019, 70 Munduruku indigenous people occupied the Natural History Museum in Alta Floresta and seized 12 funeral urns (Itiğ’a in Munduruku) and other artifacts removed from a sacred site during the building of an Amazon hydroelectric dam on the Teles Pires River, a tributary of the Tapajós River.Considered by many as one of the most egregious assaults on indigenous culture in Brazil in recent years, the building of the Teles Pires dam in 2013 destroyed Karobixexe (Seven Rapids), a sacred site for the Munduruku, Apiaká and Kayabi peoples; it was located just outside a demarcated indigenous reserve, so received no government protection. Korobixexe is extraordinarily important for the Munduruku, as they regard it as a spiritual realm inhabited by both human souls after death and also by supernatural beings, such as the “Mother of Fishes,” responsible for all fish reproduction in the Teles Pires River.According to Krixi Biwün, a woman warrior and sage, who lives in Teles Pires village, the dynamiting of the site meant the end of the Munduruku. “We will come to an end, if our spirits disappear,” she said: a ‘double annihilation,’ in life and in death.Though the building of the Tele Pires dam had serious impacts on their way of life, their territory and their spiritual practices, the Munduruku were not consulted prior to the project’s construction, as they should have been under law, according to the International Labor Organization’s Convention 169, of which Brazil is a signatory.The Teles Pires hydroelectric dam under construction. Image courtesy of Brent Millikan / International Rivers. Photo by Brent Millikan / International Rivers.Map showing reservoirs created by the Teles Pires River dams and their encroachment on indigenous lands and sacred sites. Karobixexe or Seven Rapids is marked in Portuguese as Sete Quedas. Image by Mauricio Torres.In December 2016, a Brazilian judge recognized the validity of what the Indians had said all along: that they should have been allowed a “prior, free and informed” consultation before the dam was given the go-ahead. As a result, the court ruled “invalid” the dam license issued by IBAMA, Brazil’s environment agency, in 2010. But by the time of this decision, the dam was already in commercial operation so the court’s decision had no practical impact.However, the impacts for the Munduruku have been devastating. A 2016 oil spill near the under construction São Manoel hydropower dam seriously affected indigenous communities on the Tele Pires River.Indigenous leader Taravi Kayabi described the spill’s effect: “All this is a terrible sadness for our people. This region is sacred to us. Now, along with the land being flooded [due to the dam], they´ve dirtied our water. The fish have disappeared, too. People are getting sick with diarrhea. Everyone is worried about their health.”Also since the destruction of Karobixexe and the removal of the urns, the Munduruku have reported a number of tragic incidents, including the death in 2019 of two indigenous women hit by lightning, as well the disappearance of various animals they used to hunt and of some species of fish.Determined to protect their people from further violent deaths, disasters and mishaps, the shamans decided they must retrieve the urns and bring them to an undisclosed protected place as indicated by the ancestors. “We can’t leave the spirits any longer there [in the museum]. They are complaining of the cold and the town, and they’re carrying out acts of vengeance, as we are not protecting them,” explained a shaman.“The pariwat (non-Indians) are asking us to respect their Christmas and wait,” he went on. “But their religious celebrations should have taught them to respect our sacred sites… Until today we haven’t even received an apology,” for the dynamiting of Karobixexe and seizure of the urns.Upon arrival of the Munduruku in Alta Floresta just before Christmas, Arthur Loiola, a representative of the Teles Pires Hydroelectric Company (CHTP), said that “unfortunately, CHTP cannot authorize the removal of the urns.” Loiola claimed that he needed permission from both IPHAN (the National Historic and Artistic Heritage Institute) and FUNAI (the National Indigenous Agency), even though both bodies had stated the indigenous people should be allowed to decide the final destiny of the urns.Munduruku on the Teles Pires River on their way to Ata Floresta, 21 December 2019. Image by Victor Alcantara.In 2017 the company had agreed, in principle, to transfer the urns to Munduruku territory. Despite that, the dispute dragged on, partly because, according to the shamans, they haven’t been allowed enough time in the museum to communicate with and understand the wishes of their ancestors.On 25 December, the Munduruku decided that the moment had come for direct action. “During our visit [to the museum], the spirits demanded that the shamans free them [straightaway] and we all agreed to follow their command,” the Munduruku said in a statement on 30 December. “You [the company] never asked us if you could remove our spirits. Why should we wait for you to decide what you want to do?”After the urns were reclaimed, IPHAN published a note reaffirming that it respected the right of the Munduruku to decide where the urns should be buried. After repeatedly trying to contact CHPT, Mongabay received an email from the company confirming that it had nothing to say on the matter.Dozens of researchers and civil society bodies issued a statement saying that, after so many delays, the only option remaining to the Munduruku was to reclaim their relics. Bruna Rocha, a lecturer in archaeology at the Federal University of the West of Pará (UFOPA), told Mongabay that “The action of the Munduruku was not only legitimate but heroic, given they received no financial or logistic support from any source to carry it out.”In an interview with Amazônia Real, the archaeologist Érika Gonzáles (owner of Documento, the company that originally removed the urns for CHTP), revealed that other human remains were found at the location. Once the archaeological team realized it was intruding on an indigenous site, she said, they decided to protect the artifacts. Some 270,000 pieces were ultimately removed. They are now locked up in areas controlled by the company or in museums in Cuiabá to which the Munduruku have no access.The Munduruku have been barred from another sacred site — Dekoka’a or Monkey Hill. That location was severely impacted by the construction of the São Manoel Hydroelectric Power Station, also located on the Teles Pires River. When the Indians went to the site in September 2017, the National Public Security Force, a special police unit controlled directly by the Presidency, kept them away with tear gas bombs.The Munduruku during the September 2017 São Manoel dam occupation, a peaceful protest which was met by the National Public Security Force and tear gas bombs. Image by Rosamaria Loures.A short while later, the São Manoel Energy Company obtained a judicial ruling banning all demonstrations and any attempt by indigenous people to block energy company staff from entering the São Manoel property. “It is absurd to consider us invaders when the land is ours,” responded one indigenous leader, who chose not to give his name.Questioned by Mongabay about this conflict, the energy company said that high-tension electrical equipment at the dam site posed a security risk, and the ban was aimed at protecting the safety of all concerned.Indigenous people are sceptical of the company’s explanation, seeing the ban instead as an attempt at intimidation. They also report that during their five-day river trip to Alta Floresta just before Christmas, they were monitored constantly by planes sent overhead by the two hydroelectric companies.It is believed that the Munduruku’s Christmas Day museum action may be the first ever initiative anywhere ever conducted by an indigenous group to recover their own sacred artifacts through direct action.*This story was produced with additional reporting by Thaïs Borges.Banner image caption: Munduruku assembled in front of the Museum in Alta Floresta, 23 December 2019. Image by Rosamaria Loures.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Conservation, Conservation and Religion, Controversial, Culture, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Religions, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more