Philippines bans new open-pit metal mines

first_imgThe Philippines has banned new open-pit gold, copper and silver mines, Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources Regina Lopez announced April 27.Lopez cited the need to protect biodiversity, evidence of injuries to communities and water supplies, and violations of environmental law by the mining industry.Since taking office in July, Lopez has lauched an aggressive campaign to force the mining industry to improve its practices.The ban could be one of Lopez’s last acts in office; on May 3, she faces review from a legislative committee that includes people linked to the mining industry. QUEZON CITY, Philippines — Prompted by powerful evidence of massive injury to communities and water supplies, and findings of rampant violations of environmental law, the Philippines has banned new open-pit gold, copper, nickel, and silver mines.The order to block any more open-pit metal mines in the Philippines comes a month after El Salvador became the world’s first country to ban all metal mining.“We have suffered long enough,” said Regina Lopez, the Philippine secretary of the environment, who announced the ban during a news conference here on April 27. “What are we doing? This goes against everything, everything that God wants. People are suffering so much. The Earth is suffering. It’s wrong. And it will stop.”The Chamber of Mines of the Philippines, the industry’s influential trade group, did not respond to a request for an interview for this article. But Ronald S. Recidoro, the chamber’s vice president for legal and policy, told the Business Mirror newspaper that the ban was “absurd” and “biased” against the mining industry. “It did not undergo any study,” he said.The order to prevent new open-pit mines does not affect quarries and the country’s sole open-pit coal mine. It was issued in the tenth month of an aggressive campaign by Lopez to force the Philippines mining industry to improve its practices and adhere to environmental law. On her first day in office last July, Lopez launched teams of compliance auditors to investigate how well the country’s 40 big mines were following regulations to protect water quality and ensure the safety of communities and the land.Regina Lopez, the Philippine secretary of the environment, addresses residents of Marinduque about steps she is taking to tame unlawful mining practices. The island east of Manila experienced one of the world’s worst mine tailing disasters in 1996. Photo by Keith Schneider.In February, with the audit findings in hand, Lopez cancelled or suspended the mining licenses of 26 mines. She sent two more companies “show cause” letters that asked them justify why their operations should be allowed to continue. All but a handful of the companies appealed for relief directly to President Rodrigo Duterte. While the appeals are being considered, the mines continue to operate.Lopez also cancelled agreements between the government and mining companies for 75 mines that were proposed to be built in some of the country’s most beautiful watersheds. Lopez’s orders appear to halt some $8 billion to $10 billlon in mine proposals, including the $ 5.9 billion Tampakan open-pit copper and gold mine in Mindanao.Lopez made it clear from her first days in office that she opposed the Tampakan project. It would force hundreds of people off their land, she said, damage water and ruin a magnificent tropical watershed. “Water is life,” Lopez said on Thursday. “Is it right to let this go on? Is any amount of money worth it? Is this right? We need love. Love is courage. The courage to stand up for what is true.”The order to outlaw new open-pit mines could very well be Lopez’s last as environment secretary. Next week a 25-member legislative committee that reviews cabinet appointments is scheduled to vote on approving or dismissing Lopez from her post. The committee includes a number of members that are heavily supported by mining companies. The family of the committee’s vice-chairman owns a big metal mine.Abandoned equipment and toxic mine sludge occupy the abandoned Marcopper mine on Marinduque, an island east of Manilla. A breach in the mine’s tailing pond poured millions of tons of toxic mine wastes into the Boac River. Photo by Keith Schneider.The struggle over metal mining in the Philippines has been especially fierce since 1995, when the country approved a mining statute that opened the country’s extensive gold, copper, and nickel reserves, among the world’s largest, to international development companies. The intent was to encourage foreign investment and new jobs.The next year, though, Filipinos discovered just how environmentally risky an anticipated boom in open-pit mineral mining could be. On March 24, 1996 a tailings pond breached at the Marcopper open-pit copper mine on Marinduque, an island southeast of Manila. Millions of tons of toxic mine sludge roared down the Boac River, flooding communities, wrecking the river and contaminating the sea 27 kilometers (16.7 miles) away. The Canadian company closed the mine. It is now one of the 14 abandoned open-pit mines in the Philippines that are surrounded by acres of bare and eroded hillsides and big pools of toxic acidic water contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals.In August 2012, an even bigger tailings disaster followed torrential rains at the Philex copper and gold mine in Benguet, about 315 kilometers north of Manila. Some 20 million tons of mine tailings poured from the breached tailings pond and into nearby streams.Lopez says her mining orders are meant to prevent any more damage from big new mines. “We have the most unique biodiversity on the planet,” she said in an interview. “We are the center of the center of marine biodiversity of the entire planet in the Verde Passage. It’s a passage through the islands. It’s beautiful and so clean. They want to put up a gold mine there. So I cancelled it. Hello? It’s cancelled.”Keith Schneider is an international correspondent specializing in global trends related to water, energy, and food. Based in northern Michigan, he has reported from six continents. Read his blog at ModeShift.org and reach him on Twitter @modeshift. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Gold Mining, Governance, Mining Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Adding the voice of forestry to the environmental movement (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Addressing climate change and global environmental degradation will require a total rethinking of our relationship with the natural world, including forests.However, academics and researchers appear far more open to supporting lobbying from big industries such as bioenergy.Academic forestry should consider the impact this imbalance has upon the global sustainability movement.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Last month, over 100 senior academics and researchers signed on to a knee-jerk letter from an industry lobby group criticising a Chatham House report that highlighted the serious damage industrial biomass energy is doing to the climate and environment.The Chatham House report’s findings aren’t just some treehugger mumbo-jumbo, they’re well-documented in peer-reviewed articles and IPCC reports. The critique letter, on the other hand, is biased, vague, and a clear attempt to derail the argument for a properly sustainable bioenergy regime that provides real climate benefit without degrading forest biological diversity.Because the biomass boom is great for business, the bioenergy industry is lobbying hard to keep loopholes open and to maintain false definitions of sustainability. These give big energy companies access to vast subsidies and tax breaks to convert aging coal plants to burn wood fuel, releasing dangerous amounts of CO2 and trashing global forests. But why are otherwise sensible, highly trained forest researchers and academics joining this murky movement?An immediate answer to this is that these lucrative sectors open up lots of funding from governments and forest-based industries. Also, academics spend entire careers developing economic models and scientific approaches to research, requiring detachment and objectivity. Many forest researchers are therefore not necessarily comfortable or encouraged to consider the holistic impacts of their work.This reflects a wider attitude within the forestry sector, which fails to take responsibility for its impacts on the global environment. Take Dutch Elm disease and the Ash Dieback epidemic, just two examples in a long list of tree-destroying diseases that have piggybacked into Europe on wood imports.Each of these disasters is wiping out entire species, not just of affected tree species but also immeasurable guilds of invertebrates, fungi, and animals associated with them. Foresters tend to talk about the spread of such diseases as random events, part of the inevitable risks associated with forest management. The counter “phyto-sanitary” measures presented are unfailingly reactive, treating symptoms while avoiding making any real, proactive changes to the global timber trade, the shipping industry, or to forest management as a whole. A long debate about whether monoculture-based forestry increases disease risks continues to rumble on. Arguments in favour of “business as usual” forestry are supported by citing specific examples where it works.Untangling forest management’s impacts on the global environment from the influences of other pressures is an impossible task — however, when viewed as a whole, it becomes clear that our actions are increasingly undermining the resilience of ecosystems worldwide.Forest in Söderåsen National Parl, Sweden. Photo by Zak Gratton.How about supporting domestic tree nurseries and locally sourced native tree species, rather than importing foreign-grown trees and soil? What about challenging global trade and consumerism, which promotes ever-growing amounts of useless junk being shipped around the world, boxed up in timber which has been linked with the spread of the Asian longhorn beetle in the USA and pinewood nematode in Portugal?These are difficult visions to realise in our globalised world, as existing WTO trade rules expressly forbid the laws and regulations which would be required to implement real change, while new developments such as TTIP and CETA provide even further cause for concern.Forestry as a sector could add weight to calls from environmentalists to reform our relationship with global forests and design new, truly sustainable approaches to tackle the challenges we face in the 21st Century.A good opportunity right now is the open letter urging the FAO to rework its definition of what constitutes a forest — the current definition includes tree plantations, meaning conversions from old growth, native forest to even-aged monocultures don’t need to be accounted for on climate or biodiversity reports. Over 100 NGOs have so far signed the letter, while just a handful of academics have signaled their support.Joining environmental organisations in calling for positive changes to global forestry might appear beyond the scope of forest research, but many academics clearly have no problem adding their voice to industry lobbying efforts aimed at protecting the status quo and preventing that change from happening.This is especially troubling at present, as the EU is currently debating a suite of post-Kyoto forestry and bioenergy policies for 2021 onwards, while industry and corrupted officials are fighting to weaken accounting rules to hide the true impact burning biomass has on the climate.Forestry is a broad sector, and I don’t mean to tar all foresters with the same brush. That said, my experience as an MSc student of forestry, as well as working alongside bioenergy activists from around the world, has led me to feel that forestry has become disconnected at large from the positive changes we need to force upon our policymakers right now.It is half-jokingly estimated that forestry has a 20-year “seed dormancy,” a lag-time for the sector to embrace new ideas. Forestry is a classical, slow moving beast. It wasn’t so long ago that removing ancient woodlands to plant non-native monocultures was textbook practice, and foresters are slowly realising that following natural forest processes in management decisions can benefit both biodiversity and economy.So, perhaps in 20 years those foresters who still lend their name to industrial lobbying will wake up and realise that they missed a huge opportunity to contribute to re-designing our relationship with global forests. But it could be too late by then.We can adapt management globally to massively boost forest CO2 removals from the atmosphere, getting us on track to meet our urgent climate change targets. We can close the loopholes in accounting rules, so instead they honestly show the impact burning trees for energy has on the climate. We can move towards forest management that protects biodiversity while supporting local communities worldwide.Adding a clear voice from forestry to environmental campaigns would add momentum to this exciting movement.Birch polypore Piptoporus betulinus in Gribskov forest, Denmark. Photo by Zak Gratton.Zak Gratton is an environmental campaigner and ecologist, currently undertaking an MSc in Forest and Nature Management in Copenhagen. Follow him on Twitter: @fungiforever.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Activism, Biodiversity, Bioenergy, Biomass Burning, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Researcher Perspective Series last_img read more

Video: Hatchlings boost hope for extremely rare duck

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta WCS has filmed three white-winged ducklings leaving a tree-hollow in Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWS), Cambodia.The mother duck had herself been rescued by villagers in mid-2015 when she was injured. She was treated, rehabilitated and later returned to the wild in December 2015.Fewer than 1,000 mature white-winged ducks remain in the wild, and the species is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List. In July this year, three villagers discovered a bird’s nest inside a hollow of the Koki tree in Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWS), Cambodia.The nest was special — it belonged to the extremely rare white-winged duck (Asarcornis scutulata), a species with only 250 to 1,000 individuals remaining in the wild. This was also the first time in five years that a white-winged duck nest had been spotted in the Northern Plains of Cambodia.Some of the eggs in the nest have now hatched, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced in a statement. In a rare moment yesterday, WCS filmed three white-winged ducklings leaving the tree-hollow, bringing hope for the endangered species.The video also shows the mother duck waiting for her babies on a tree branch. The mother had herself been rescued by people from Prey Veng village in mid-2015 when she had been injured. She was handed her over to a WCS team, who then transferred her to Angkor Center for Conservation of Biodiversity (ACCB) for rehabilitation. Later in December 2015, the duck was tagged and released back to the wild.The white-winged duck, with its black body and thickly spotted white head, is one of the largest species of ducks in the world. The waterbird was once widespread, occurring throughout Northeast India, Bangladesh and Southeast Asia.Now, only a few hundred birds remain in the wild, their numbers plummeting due to the rapid loss of its riverine habitat, their small and scattered populations, and hunting for their eggs and meat. The white-winged duck is now listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List .“The ducklings are the latest piece of great news resulting from an innovative program developed by WCS in conjunction with Ministry of Environment (MoE), in which local people are compensated to protect and monitor endangered birds instead of harvesting them,” WCS said in the statement.White-winged duck mother (left) and her nest that was discovered by local farmers (right). Photos courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Videos, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

A rhino called hope

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife Only 50-100 Sumatran rhinos are believed to remain. Seven live at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia.One of the sanctuary’s residents, Harapan, was transferred from the Cincinnati Zoo two years ago.Harapan’s caretakers say he is in good health, is settling into the facility and will soon be introduced to one the center’s female rhinos in hopes of siring offspring. Harapan, a Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) born in captivity in the United States, has now been living for almost two years at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Park.As a representative of one of the world’s rarest and most endangered mammal species, Harapan’s wellbeing in Indonesia has been a source of interest and concern for conservationists and animal lovers around the world.According to his current caretakers, Harapan — whose name means “hope” in Indonesian, although his fans in America often called him Harry — appears to have settled in well since arriving from the Cincinnati Zoo in November 2015.“Harapan is already independent,” said Zulfi Arsan, the facility’s lead veterinarian. “He has adapted to the surrounding environment like other rhinos at the SRS. His activities, such as wallowing and foraging, are all normal.”Harapan’s initial three-month quarantine period went off without a hitch, Arsan said. After spending his formative years in a zoo, the rhino is getting used to the wide variety of natural fodder available at the fenced-in facility, and now weighs in at a healthy 780 kilograms (1,720 pounds).Now, his caretakers hope Harapan will be able to contribute to the survival of his species by fathering offspring with one of the female rhinos at the SRS.Harapan, born at the Cincinnati Zoo in Ohio, now lives at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park in Lampung, Indonesia. Photo by Rahmadi Rahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.The total global population of Sumatran rhinos is estimated at somewhere between 50 and 100 individuals. Seven of those now live at the SRS, including Harapan’s brother Andalas, who was transferred to the facility in 2007.Since his arrival, Andalas and a female rhino named Ratu have produced two calves: Andatu (male) in June 2012 and Delilah (female) in May 2016. The birth of these two healthy calves has been a source of much-needed optimism for the future of the species.The wild Sumatran rhino population declined massively in the 20th century, due to both hunting and habitat loss. In response, zoos in Southeast Asia, Europe and the United States launched a captive breeding program. Starting in 1984, a total of 40 rhinos were captured from Indonesia and Malaysia and distributed among participating zoos.By 2000, no calves had been born and almost all of the rhinos held in zoos had died — some due to old age, but many due to gastrointestinal disorders and other health problems. Three of the survivors – Torgamba, Bina and Dusun – were sent to the SRS, while a pair remained in Cincinnati.In addition to being the smallest of the rhino species, Sumatran rhinos like Harapan have a distinctive shaggy coat. Photo by Rahmadi Rahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.Finally, in 2001, Andalas was born to the Cincinnati Zoo’s rhinos — the first known captive Sumatran rhino birth in over a century. A female calf named Suci followed in 2004, then Harapan in 2007.By 2014 three of the rhinos at the Cincinnati Zoo had died. Ipuh, the father, succumbed to thyroid cancer, while Suci and her mother Emi died of  of iron-storage disease or hemochromatosis, prompting zookeepers in Ohio to agree to Harapan’s transfer to SRS. “This condition (hemochromatosis), occurs in rhinos ‘cared for’ in zoos. This is because of limited feed, especially in terms of quantity and variety,” Arsan said.The staff at SRS argue that living in conditions as close as possible to their natural habitat is critical to avoiding such problems. Harapan showed signs of suffering from the same metabolic disorder, but living at SRS and consuming his species’ natural diet should improve his condition, Arsan said.Other potential health concerns for Harapan and the other rhinos at SRS include gastrointestinal infections like E. Coli or Salmonella, and parasites including the deadly blood-borne Trypanosoma evansi.“These diseases are not specific to rhinos, but can be transmitted between them. For Trypanosoma, it requires vector animals, which are blood-sucking flies that can transmit the disease from a sick animal to a healthy one,” Arsan said.To counter these threats, the rhinos at SRS get weekly heath check-ups and regular doses of de-worming medications.Like the other rhinos at the center, Harapan receives regular health and hygiene checks. Photo by Rahmadi Rahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.With Harapan in good health, attention has now turned to finding him a mate among the three females at the SRS: Ratu, Rosa and Bina. The sanctuary’s staff have been working to determine who holds the most attraction for Harapan by observing his response to urine sprayed on leaves by each of the females. “As it turns out, Harapan is most interested in urine from Ratu,” said Arsan.The sanctuary is now making plans to introduce Ratu to Harapan, in hopes that his apparent interest in the female will lead to a natural mating. “We hope this will happen as soon as possible,” Arsan said.Harapan is one of three males living at the SRS. His brother Andalas was transferred to the facility in 2007, where he sired the male calf Andatu, as well as a female calf named Delilah. The SRS is also home to three adult females: Rosa, Bina and Ratu. Photo by Rahmadi Rahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 22, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image: Harapan appears to be thriving on varied diet of natural foliage. Photo by Rahmadi Rahmad/Mongabay-Indonesia.Correction: this article has been updated to reflect the fact that Ipuh, Harapan’s sire, died of thyroid cancer rather than iron-storage disease.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesian minister draws fire for denial of transboundary haze problem

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Carbon Emissions, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Politics, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Governance, Government, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Haze, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests, wildfires Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jongcenter_img Banner image: A military personnel extinguishes fires at Panderman Mountain in East Java, Indonesia, in 2019. Image by Falahi Mubarok/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia’s environment minister continues to deny that fires in the country are sending toxic haze to neighboring Malaysia and Singapore.An environmental activist warns that this stance, which goes against the data presented by Malaysia, risks undermining Indonesia’s credibility.The haze is an annual irritant in diplomatic ties between Indonesia and its neighbors, with much of the burning taking place to clear land for oil palm and pulpwood plantations.Malaysia has offered to help Indonesia fight the fires, which have sickened tens of thousands of people in Sumatra and Borneo, threatened an elephant reserve, and churned more than 100 millions of tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s environment minister risks undermining the country’s credibility if she continues denying, in the face of overwhelming data, that haze from Indonesian forest fires is affecting neighboring Malaysia and Singapore, an activist says.Siti Nurbaya Bakar, the minister of environment and forestry, said on Sept. 11 that she would write to her Malaysian counterpart, Yeo Bee Yin, via the Malaysian ambassador, to address the problem “objectively.”“Because the fact is that the smoke entering Malaysia, into Kuala Lumpur, comes from Sarawak [in Malaysian Borneo] and also from the Malay Peninsula, and maybe also partly from West Kalimantan [in Indonesian Borneo],” she said as reported by Tempo.Yeo, however, said the facts showed otherwise.“Let the data speak for itself,” she wrote in a Facebook post.She then went on to cite figures from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) Specialist Meteorological Centre, the ASMC, showing a massive disparity between the number of fire hotspots in Indonesia and Malaysia.Graphic from the Asean Specialised Meteorological Centre (ASMC) showing the number of hotspots in Indonesia and Malaysia. Image courtesy of ASMC.On Sept. 10, there were 474 fires in Indonesian Borneo, also known as Kalimantan, and 387 in Sumatra. That same day, there were only seven hotspots detected in Malaysia: four in Malaysian Borneo and three in Peninsular Malaysia.On Sept. 11, the number of hotspots had spiked to 1,188 in Kalimantan and 431 in Sumatra, and gone down to just five in Malaysia.“As for [Siti’s] claim that the haze is from Sarawak, just look at the wind direction,” Yeo wrote. “How is it logically possible?“Minister Siti Nurbaya should not be in denial,” she added.A map from the Asean Specialised Meteorological Centre (ASMC) showing haze coverage and wind direction in southern ASEAN region. Image by ASMC.In a separate statement, Yeo said “The data clearly shows that the haze is from Indonesia,” and added that she had discussed the matter with the Malaysian prime minister, who agreed to write to Indonesia’s president about the transboundary haze.Singapore has also attributed the haze in the city-state to the fires in Sumatra, with the National Environment Agency (NEA) warning that air quality would enter the “unhealthy” range if the fires persisted.Siti again denied that the Indonesian fires were to blame. “That’s not true that there’s [haze] from Riau [province] crossing to Singapore,” she said. “Why? Because in Riau [the number of hotspots] has declined.”A patrolling team hired by oil palm company PT ATGA to douse fires in the concession. Image by Elviza Diana/Mongabay Indonesia.‘She will be embarrassed’Siti’s insistence that the haze affecting neighboring countries isn’t coming from Indonesia could end in embarrassment for the Indonesian minister, said Kiki Taufik, Greenpeace Southeast Asia’s Indonesian forest campaign head.“If the minister keeps debating by saying there’s no [transboundary haze], she will be embarrassed when she is shown the map that there’s [transboundary haze],” he told Mongabay. “Therefore, it’s better to focus on extinguishing the fires. The problem is the people in Sumatra and Kalimantan who are suffering. So why bother [debating]? Just extinguish the fires.”Kiki also questioned Siti’s apparent refutation of the ASMC data, which are drawn from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He said Malaysia was right to refer to the ASMC, given that the institution was established in 1993 as a collaborative effort by ASEAN member states, which include Indonesia and Malaysia, to monitor and assess land and forest fires as well as transboundary haze in the region. Refuting the ASMC data will only tarnish Indonesia’s reputation, Kiki said.“The ASMC was established together [by ASEAN members]. So if we don’t believe [the ASMC], our country’s credibility will be laughed at,” he said.Kiki also noted that Indonesia had ratified the ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution (AATHP), which came in response to a haze crisis in the region caused by widespread forest fires in Indonesia in 1997 and 1998. The agreement calls on member states to “undertake measures to prevent and control activities related to land and/or forest fires that may lead to transboundary haze pollution.”Fires raze Jambi’s protected peat forest Londerang. Image by Elviza Diana/Mongabay Indonesia.‘Situation could worsen’In its alerts, the ASMC said some haze from West Kalimantan had been blown by winds to western Sarawak, while haze from Riau and Jambi provinces in Sumatra had been blown across the Strait of Malacca to western parts of Peninsular Malaysia.“The prevailing dry weather in the region is expected to persist in the coming weeks and a further escalation of hotspot activities in Sumatra is possible,” the center said. “With the prevailing winds expected to continue blowing from the southeast or southwest, the transboundary haze situation could worsen.”Malaysia, in particular, has been heavily affected by the haze, with some parts of the peninsula blanketed in heavily polluted air.On Sept. 10, the Air Pollutant Index (API) in Kuala Lumpur hit 138, in the “unhealthy” range, the New Straits Times reported. It was the highest API reading in the city since the last haze crisis in 2015, also a result of forest fires raging across the strait in Sumatra.Malaysian Borneo has also suffered from the ongoing haze episode, with the government having to distribute half a million face masks and shut down 409 schools in the state of Sarawak after the air quality in the state reached “very unhealthy” levels on Sept. 10. Schools were reopened the following day.Boo Siang Voon, a 47-year-old engineer in Kuching, the capital of Sarawak, described the skies as “hazy, hot with smoky smell.”“This year the smog is getting worse,” he told AFP. “Residents are using face masks. We should not pay the price of our health for the open burning. We want a solution.”The air quality in Singapore has also been worsening, but remains within a moderate range for now. The haze from Indonesia has reportedly also reached as far as southern Thailand, with authorities there detecting an increase in dust particles of less than 2.5 microns, known as PM2.5, that can lead to many health problems, including coughing, breathing difficulties and eye irritation.Smoke from fires burning on drained peatlands cleared for oil palm in East Kalimantan, Indonesia in 2018. Photo courtesy of Linus.Offers of assistanceThe ASEAN haze agreement encourages member states to help one another fight fires. Greenpeace’s Kiki urged the Indonesian government to accept the repeated offers of assistance made by Malaysia to that end.The Malaysian ambassador to Indonesia, Zainal Abidin Bakar, said his government had sent a diplomatic note, mistakenly perceived as a protest letter, to the Indonesian government.“It is not a protest letter, but is of Malaysia’s intention to help in dealing with haze (to fight fire at forest and agricultural areas in Indonesia),” he said as quoted by The Star Online, adding that Malaysia was not pointing a finger at Indonesia over the current haze problem.“If Malaysia said they could help us, then let’s work together to extinguish the fires,” Kiki said. “Because many owners of palm oil plantations [in Indonesia] are from Singapore and Malaysia. So there’s no need to worry that Indonesia will be perceived as a smog exporter. What’s important is tackling the problem.”During this year’s fire season, the Indonesian environment ministry’s law enforcement department has sealed off fire-hit concessions held by 30 companies, some of them Singaporean and Malaysian companies. Four of the 30 companies have been charged in connection with the fires.Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) environmental expert Mohd Yusoff Ishak told the New Straits Times that Malaysia and Singapore should form a joint investigation team with Indonesia to crack down on those responsible for the forest fires, especially those in the concessions of big companies.He added that Malaysia had to be prepared to prosecute its own companies because “we have a large number of Malaysian-run corporations in the affected areas.”“This time around, it can’t just be small planters that are doing this,” he told the Malaysian newspaper. “I believe that part of this is due to big corporations allowing such incidents. That’s why we need to have a multi-pronged strategy, where we target big companies that allow their plantations to be burnt.”Children in villages near Palangka Raya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, wearing masks during a haze episode. Image by Lina A. Karolina.Carbon emissionsExperts have warned of an exacerbated fire risk this year as a result of an intense dry season and El Niño weather pattern. This year’s fire season is expected to be the worst since 2015, when similar conditions led to the razing of  more than 20,000 square kilometers (7,700 square miles) of land, much of it peat forest. The fires each year are set deliberately to clear land for oil palm and pulpwood plantations.This year, the fires are taking a heavy toll on public health. In South Sumatra province alone, more than 32,000 people have reportedly suffered from respiratory tract infections in the past five weeks. Nearly half are infants under the age of 5.The fires are also affecting wildlife in Sumatra. Fires have reportedly spread into Padang-Sugihan Wildlife Reserve, in South Sumatra, one of the last strongholds of the Sumatran elephant.“Last week there were 12 [fire] hotspots, but on Monday we detected more,” Adio Syafri, of the Hutan Kita Institute, an NGO, told Mongabay Indonesia.Yusuf Bahtimi, a peatland researcher at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), confirmed the presence of the hotspots, saying they were visible from a village on the periphery of the reserve.The fires also spell disaster for Indonesia’s commitment to curb its carbon emissions. Nearly 3,400 square kilometers (1,300 square miles) of forest have been burned in the first eight months of the year, according to official figures. That has resulted in the release of almost 110 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) into the atmosphere — nearly half of Indonesia’s annual emissions between 2006 and 2016.Ruandha Agung Suhardiman, the environment ministry’s head of climate change, played down the figures, saying that the 2018 fire season saw 5,100 square kilometers (1,970 square miles) of forest razed and 121 million tons of CO2e emitted.But with this year’s dry season still expected to escalate, peaking in October, the haze and fire episode is expected to only get worse in the coming weeks, with carbon emissions also set to balloon.last_img read more

This land is ours: New law could end age-old injustice faced by Liberian women (commentary)

first_imgLofa County has vast swaths of fertile land, including rich, dense forest, and it was considered Liberia’s breadbasket before the country’s 14-year civil war, which affected this area more severely than any other in terms of population displacement and the destruction of infrastructure. Lofa was also the first county to be hit by the Ebola virus outbreak in March 2014.Yet, long pre-dating these profound traumas is an injustice that has shaped the lives of women here, and across Liberia, for generations: the denial of their land rights.The Land Rights Act, which President George Weah signed in September 2018, is the first Liberian law to recognize women’s rights to land and one of Africa’s most advanced land rights laws. It’s not hyperbole to say that it has the potential to fundamentally alter Liberian women’s life prospects and create a more just power balance in the country.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Lofa County, Liberia – Ten women are gathered in the open-air concrete slab building that serves as a community center for Gbonyea, a village a few kilometers from Liberia’s border with Guinea and a five-hour drive from the capital, Monrovia.Loretta Althea Pope Kai, the charismatic program director for local NGO the Foundation for Community Initiatives (FCI), asks the women a series of questions, each one focused on whether they own land. Virtually none of them do.For around two hours, the women outline the challenges they face, and Pope Kai carefully steers them through their rights. As the meeting draws to a close, the group breaks into an impassioned rallying call: “We want land. We want land…”Lofa County has vast swaths of fertile land, including rich, dense forest, and it was considered Liberia’s breadbasket before the country’s 14-year civil war, which affected this area more severely than any other in terms of population displacement and the destruction of infrastructure. Lofa was also the first county to be hit by the Ebola virus outbreak in March 2014.Yet, long pre-dating these profound traumas is an injustice that has shaped the lives of women here, and across Liberia, for generations: the denial of their land rights. The reality of this becomes vividly clear straight after the meeting.Along with three sisters who were among those in attendance, Pope Kai and I take a short drive, followed by a ten-minute hike through trails that cut through the thickets of lush forest around Gbonyea. We stop at a clearing and one of the sisters, Rita Massquio, explains: “This is our father’s land that was taken away from us.”After their father died, the land should have passed to their brother under customary law, but he was too unwell to look after it. Now, according to Massquio, the community is denying the sisters their land, and a local landlord’s son has planted rubber on it. “We don’t have nobody that can help us so that we can get our land back,” she says.The sisters’ story was echoed a number of times in interviews conducted with the women of Gbonyea. I heard of a mother driven off her land by her brother; of a woman who is precariously sustaining her family on land she doesn’t own; of a daughter forced, along with her mother, off their land by her late father’s wife.Land is powerPope Kai is all too familiar with such tales. “Land is power, and men love power,” she says. “Although women are the primary users of forests, it is men who have always made the decisions about them.”The 2003 Inheritance Law defined some land rights for married women (granting them just a third of their husband’s property after death), but women in Liberia still have no land rights outside of inheritance. Unmarried women are not able to own land privately or collectively.In practice, this means that unmarried women — who represent 62 percent of Liberian women — can’t own land or have their own house. This often leaves them having to squat with their families. These women are often unpaid laborers within their families, having to tend to the land and take care of relatives at the same time — yet they can’t own or make decisions about the very land they stand on.“In rural communities, women are seen as properties because when they marry, the husband pays a dowry, which means they buy the woman from their family and the woman becomes the husband’s possession. As properties themselves, the wives cannot own a property,” explains Pope Kai.Liberia may have elected Africa’s first female head of state in Ellen Sirleaf Johnson, but evidence is everywhere of the barriers that women face. Agriculture and forestry are cornerstones of Liberia’s economy, generating around 40 percent of its Gross Domestic Product. Despite 80 percent of agricultural workers and a fifth of forestry laborers being women, they have little control over the land.This mirrors women’s position in society more generally: In 2018, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) ranked Liberia 155th out of 160 countries on gender equality, based on reproductive health, empowerment, and economic activity. It would be a mistake, however, to see women’s predicament in Liberia as an aberration: according to studies, nearly half of the world’s smallholder farmers are women, yet they own less than 20 percent of the world’s land.Empowering womenGrowing up in Monrovia with two brothers, Pope Kai was acutely aware of gender disparities. In a nation where only 27 percent of women are literate compared to 60 percent of men, she says she was lucky that her parents were able to support and encourage her education: “Most of my [female] peers were not able to complete their schooling, because their parents either didn’t have the finances or didn’t support them. Because of this I grew up with a passion to mentor other young women and advocate for their rights.”Today, as Program Director at FCI, which is based in Monrovia, Pope Kai is doing just this.Her work focuses on increasing women’s confidence and their ability to participate in decision-making processes. A key aspect of this is educating women (as well as men and younger people) on the law — and in particular the Land Rights Act, which President George Weah signed in September 2018.A revolutionary ActThe Act, which is the first Liberian law to recognize women’s rights to land, is one of Africa’s most advanced land rights laws.Under it, women are defined as part of their community, and are able to participate in how land is managed and run. Land can now be owned privately, jointly, and collectively by management bodies, and all women, married or not.It’s not hyperbole to say that it has the potential to fundamentally alter Liberian women’s life prospects and create a more just power balance between the country’s men and women.“This is a big step towards equality, but having the law is nothing if it isn’t implemented properly,” says Kai Pope.If its potential is realized, then all Liberians will benefit.A 2011 report by the United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization outlined the wider gains that closing the gender gap in agriculture can bring, stating: “If women in rural areas had the same access to land, technology, financial services, education and markets as men, agricultural production could be increased and the number of hungry people reduced by 100-150 million.”The women of Gbonyea are only too willing to play their part in transforming their own society.Alexandra Benjamin is a Forest Governance Campaigner at the forests and rights NGO Fern. This article is from Fern’s forthcoming report, Our Forests, Our Lives, featuring articles on forest governance from tropical forested countries.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Land Rights, Researcher Perspective Series center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Amazon deforestation paces ahead of recent historical norm

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is continuing to pace ahead of recent historical norms, reveals data released by Brazil’s national space research agency INPE.INPE’s satellite-based short-term deforestation detection system has recorded 8,683 square kilometers of forest clearing since January 1, 79% higher than a year ago.According to INPE, forest clearing since August 1 has amounted to 4,217 sq km, 111% of last year’s tally.The new figures come less than a month after the Brazilian government published a preliminary estimate for deforestation for the year ended July 31, 2019. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is continuing to pace ahead of recent historical norms despite global outcry over ongoing destruction of Earth’s largest rainforest, reveals data released by Brazil’s national space research agency INPE.INPE’s satellite-based short-term deforestation detection system has recorded 8,683 square kilometers of forest clearing since January 1, the highest on record since the agency started releasing monthly data in 2007. 2019’s figure is 79% higher than a year ago. According to INPE, forest clearing since August 1 — the start of August 1-July 31 year Brazil uses for tracking annual deforestation trends — has amounted to 4,217 sq km, 111% of last year’s tally.The new figures come less than a month after the Brazilian government released a preliminary estimate for deforestation for the year ended July 31, 2019. Government data put deforestation at 9,762 sq km, an increase of 30 percent over the prior year. But that estimate doesn’t include the sharp uptick in deforestation in August 2019, when smoke from fires burning in Amazonia made international headlines and put a spotlight on Jair Bolsonaro’s policies in the Amazon, which include weakening environmental law enforcement, encouraging ranchers and farmers to clear forest, and stripping protections from conservation areas and indigenous lands.INPE’s data is virtually mirrored by data independently aggregated by Imazon, a Brazilian NGO.SAD is Imazon’s deforestation alert system. DETER is INPE’s deforestation alert system.Header image: Google Earth image showing deforestation south of Santarém, in the state of Pará. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Past The Finishing Post

first_imgPast The Finishing PostTrack: Good Weather: FineRace 1 1600 M (Purse $768,000) NB3-Y-O MAIDEN SPECIAL WEIGHT1. SNEAK PEAK JAnderson 54.02. TASHIE BABY SMuir 52.0 2 1/2L3. MR. GRAND NATIONAL DBadaloo 54.0 2 1/2L4. BRIDLED PRINCESS MGrant 53.5 18/1 2DNF #4 DIAMOND SEllisFinal Time : 1:45.1 Splits : 24.3, 47.4, 1:14.2WIN: $246.00PLACE: $213.00, $186.00, $192.00Winner : 3yo b colt – HE’STHEREALTHING – MS. MARTHA BRAETrainer : KEVIN BRIVETTE Owner: CALVERTON I BROWNBred by PERCIVAL A. HENRY (DR.)Qu: $1,036.00 Ex: $1,718.00Trifecta: $2,468.00Race 2 1200 M (Purse $530,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($250,0-$210,0)/NB5YO-NW2 & 6YO&UP-NW41. JODY’S LODGE SEllis 53.52. PRINCESS NIYAH SMuir 51.5 6L3. EL CLIENTE RWilson 54.0 1/2L4. SINK THE BISMARCK JAnderson 52.5 3 1/2LFinal Time : 1:15.3 Splits : 23.3, 46.4, ,WIN: $168.00PLACE: $128.00, $119.00, $142.00Winner : 3yo b filly – BLUE PEPSI LODGE – SIMPLY DEVINETrainer : SPENCER CHUNG Owner : BROTHERLY CONNECTIONBred by MARCUS BRADLEYQu: $391.00 Ex: $858.00D/E: $972.00Trifecta: $743.00KEELING MEMORIAL CUPRace 3 1100 M (Purse $850,000) NB2-Y-O RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE I(NW3)1. VISION LSteadman4 53.0 16/1*2. DREAMLINER RHalledeen 55.0 1 1/4L3. NUCLEAR AFFAIR OWalker 52.5 2 3/4L4. BABY P OEdwards4 48.5 5LFinal Time : 1:08.1 Splits : 22.4, 46.2WIN: $885.00Qu: $185.00 Ex: $1,527.00D/E : $3,799.00Trifecta: $1,119.00Rolling Triple: $22,691.00Winner : 2yo ch colt – HE’STHEREALTHING – MONEY SPINNERTrainer : WAYNE DACOSTA Owner : ELIZABETH A DACOSTABred by ORANGE VALLEY ESTATES LTD.Race 4 1600 M (Purse $530,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE V(NW2)1. MARIA’S GLORY HPottinger4 50.52. WHO’S BOSSY KPowell 51.0 3 1/2L3. TRACKING DANIEL RHalledeen 48.0 1/2L*4. MISS ADDI SEllis 54.0 3 1/2LFinal Time : 1:45.0 Splits : 24.1, 48.0, 1:13.4,WIN: $151.00PLACE: $66.00, $74.00, $82.00Qu: $952.00 Ex: $1,554.00D/E: $2,713.00Superfecta: $3,593.00Rolling Triple: $15,595.00Winner : 4yo b filly – KERRYGOLD – LA CERENTOLATrainer : GARY GRIFFITHS Owner : PHILIP A AZARBred by PHILIP A. AZARRace 5 1000 M (S) (Purse $560,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE IV(NW3)1. FIFTYONESTORM OEdwards4 48.52. CHEERS RLunan 53.0 5 1/4L3. MAGIC CITY RLahoe 52.0 1 1/4L4. KABRINA OFoster 53.0 3/4 LFinal Time : 0:59.4 Splits : 22.3, 45.3WIN: $138.00PLACE: $74.00, $117.00, $81.00Qu: $919.00 Ex: $1,159.00D/E: $318.00Superfecta: $3,893.00Rolling Triple: $14,024.00Winner : 4yo b filly – STORM CRAFT – SHE’S A GEMTrainer : EDWARD WALKER Owner : EDWARD S WALKERBred by ALLAN L. FLOWERSRace 6 1300 M (Purse $500,000) NB4-Y-O & UP MAIDEN CONDITION RACE1. LUCKYBEGOOD OEdwards4 50.02. GIRSHOM PParchment 56.0 5 1/2L3. ALL FOR THE GLORY RWilson 57.0 1/2L4. MY FAVORITE DANCER RSaunders 54.0 3L5. IDON’TKNOW NBerger4 48.0 Sh.Head5. ON THE DOUBLE RLahoe 54.0 3 1/2LLate scratch : #2 AWESOME ROCKETFinal Time : 1:24.3 Splits : 24.0, 48.1, 1:16.1,WIN: $238.00PLACE: $159.00, $293.00, $120.00Winner : 4yo ch filly – BURNING MARQUE – LITTLERICHGIRLTrainer : BERNARD VINCENT Owner : GORDON A. BUCKNOR & MEGAN L. VERGO-BUCKNORBred by GREGORY BUCKNORQu: $5,276.00 Ex: $19,068.00D/E: $453.00Trifecta: $28,084.00Hit-6 carry-over : $62,214.75Rolling Triple: $2,003.00Pick-4 : $172,668.00Super-6: $7,726,094.50Race 7 1400 M (Purse $768,000) IMP3YO&UP(NW3&MDN)/NB4YO(NW3O/T)&NB3YO-REST.STAKES1. HOUDINI’S MAGIC SEllis 53.0*2. DRIPPING IN GOLD RHalledeen 54.0 Nose3. LONG RUNNING TRAIN RMairs 53.0 1/2L4. BRAWN OWalker 56.0 4 1/2LFinal Time : 1:26.1 Splits : 23.1, 45.4, 1:11.2,WIN: $1342.00PLACE: $181.00, $81.00, $164.00Qu: $916.00 Ex: $2,502.00D/E: $15,075.00Superfecta: $50,508.00Rolling Triple: $22,045.00Winner : 3yo b colt – PERFORMING MAGIC – MILESTONETrainer : ANTHONY NUNES Owner : DERRICK H BRANDTBred by EVERGLADES FARMS LTD.Race 8 1600 M (Purse $560,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($350,0-$300,0)/NB5YO-NW3*1. COLD GROUND JErwin 54.02. JESSIE JAMES KRobinson 54.0 3L3. DOC HOLIDAY OFoster 56.0 1 1/2 L4. OUR CREATION RLunan 55.0 2 3/4L5. BATIDOR DE MUNDO SMuir 56.0 3 1/2LLate scratch : #5 SIRMANDIFinal Time : 1:42.4 Splits : 24.0, 46.4, 1:12.1,WIN: $136.00PLACE: $76.00, $240.00, $95.00Qu:: $807.00 Ex: $1,045.00D/E : $7,666.00Trifecta: $3,316.00Hi-5: $43,977.00Rolling Triple: $33,490.00Winner : 7yo b horse – STORM CRAFT – PFEIFFERTrainer : DONOVAN PLUMMER Owner: DONOVAN PLUMMERBred by MARK & SUSAN WATESGOVERNOR GENERAL’S STAKESRace 9 2000 M (Purse $1,200,000) 3-Y-O & UP GRADED STAKES*1. PERFECT NEIGHBOUR RHalledeen 53.02. TYPEWRITER SEllis 57.0 5L3. UNCLE TAF OWhite 50.0 3 1/4L4. HOVER CRAFT PFrancis 50.0 1 1/2LFinal Time : 2:07.3 Splits : 24.3, 51.2, 1:15.0, 1:40.3WIN: $78.00Qu: $100.00 Ex: $181.00D/E: $179.00Trifecta: $181.00Rolling Triple: $14,174.00Winner : 5yo b horse – NATURAL SELECTION – DESPERATEHOUSEWIFETrainer : WAYNE DACOSTA Owner : ALFRED A. LEE & JEFFREY S. MORDECAIBred by Y.S. (1955) LTD.Race 10 1000 M (S) (Purse $500,000) 4YO&UP CLM($180,0)-NOT EARNED $120,0 SINCE MAY 261. SIR D LSteadman4 52.02. INFANTRY OFFICER RHalledeen 55.0 3/4L3. PAPER N LACE OWhite 52.0 1 3/4L4. FASTANDFLASHY AnthThomas4 50.5 3/4L5. FABULOUSCONNECTION PParchment 55.0 1 1/2LFinal Time : 1:01.2 Splits : 23.0, 47.1, ,WIN: $179.00PLACE: $73.00, $97.00, $203.00Winner : 7yo ch horse – CONCERTO (USA) – ANOTHER MOOCHIETrainer : RYAN DARBY Owner : RAPHAEL E GORDONBred by STUD EL AGUILAQu: $356.00 Ex: $656.00D/E: $353.00Trifecta: $2,351.00Hi-5: $14,010.00Rolling Triple: $1,138.00Pick-4: $30,720.00Super-6: $188,629.40 (6 OF 6)Pick-9: $12,505.00 (7 OF 9) $225.50 (6 OF 9)Carry-over : $437,671.50last_img read more

Ateneo’s road to UAAP title started in Baler training camp

first_imgJo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ “It was built around the fact that it was very difficult for young men who are at the height of their physical prowess, all of whom have egos that are fed by loving parents, adoring girlfriends, adoring fans, victories along the way, and these egos need to be broken down and submitted to the whole purpose,” said Baldwin. “The best way to break ego is to break the man, reduce the man to a state where he can’t do things on his own, that he requires the assistance of others in order to accomplish something.”This hardship allowed the 13-1 Blue Eagles to recover from two straight defeats, in the final game of the eliminations against De La Salle and in the Final Four against Far Eastern University, en route to the championship round.The Blue Eagles took the three-game series against the Green Archers 2-1 with the third game ending in a close 88-86 contest.“I want you guys to know that the team showed its character after the loss to La Salle in the second round and that loss was actually a blessing in disguise,” said Nieto. “When FEU forced a do-or-die game, that was when we showed how united this team is.”ADVERTISEMENT Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set LATEST STORIES PH wins 2023 Fiba World Cup hosting Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Co-captain Mike Nieto said it was the camp’s hardship that strengthened them not only physically but also emotionally.“The 10 months we spent with coach Tab, the sacrifices, it was never easy,” said Nieto in Filipino Saturday during the team’s media session at Ateneo. “You can say that we were the ones who worked the hardest in the offseason.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBrian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense“Baler was the worst week, and ever since that camp we knew that we shouldn’t lose and giving up is never an option.”Baldwin said he took the brutal approach from the legendary NCAA football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant when he led Texas A&M to the Southwest Conference title in 1954. Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View comments It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAteneo’s journey to its ninth UAAP seniors basketball title didn’t start in the Blue Eagles’ 85-65 bludgeoning of Adamson University in the season opener, the odyssey started way back in the summer of 2017.The Blue Eagles traveled from Katipunan to Baler to hold a hellish training camp that the players and coaches vowed to never speak of its details.ADVERTISEMENT Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hourslast_img read more

Major transactions after the NCM are fraudulent, null and void

first_imgDear Editor,All major transactions conducted by this PNC-led coalition Government after the successful passage of the No-Confidence Motion are fraudulent and considered null and void.Even if those transactions were Cabinet decisions, they nonetheless constitute a fraud on this nation and I hasten to say all of those land deals will be at the investigation and recovery of the State Assets Recovery Agency. It is the mistaken belief in some quarters that because these are Cabinet decisions those land deals are binding on succeeding governments.Well, they are ever so wrong because no deal, business or otherwise, conducted after the No-Confidence Motion will stand, this a fraud perpetrated at the highest level which will see recovery at the detriment of the beneficiaries.The State Assets Recovery Agency will be in full mode to recover those stolen assets, this Government cannot wantonly break the law and expect us to be cheerleaders for them. It also means that the benefactors of these corrupt deals must kiss those sweet assets goodbye. It is as simple as that, end of discussion.For some strange unexplained reason, Mr Granger believes that this country is his private domain for him to do as he pleases. He has turned up his nose on the law some six months now and is presently in the process of a brazen sellout of our prime resources to his friends. This is corruption at its highest if you have ever seen one.So, I hasten to tell Mr Granger that Guyana is not his private property and we are not for sale. Your actions have not gone unnoticed and there will be consequences for those gross violations of our laws. There will be consequences for your transgressions.Some time ago, Kaieteur News used to carry a section captioned “Heist of Guyana” I wonder what they are saying now that thousands of acres of prime lands were given away to PNC friends and associates? I wonder what are their thoughts now seeing everything is in the spotlight with verifiable and damnable evidence. I see Adam Harris in his usual apologetic role, trying desperately to make out a case for Granger’s actions by making the Opposition Leader’s claims to be a racial one. Well, I must tell this learned gentleman that it is not any of what he is insinuating, but what we have witnessed this past week was a clear case of a Government’s crass disrespect for the laws of this country and nothing else.This type of behaviour is symptomatic of the old dictatorial PNC party which should not be allowed to flourish here. We say down with dictatorial and illegal governments.Respectfully,Neil Adamslast_img read more