Japanese, Singaporean banks finance controversial Indonesian coal plant

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Esterman The financial close for the Tanjung Jati B coal-fired power plant expansion was announced on Feb. 27 by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation. Funding will be provided by eight Japanese and Singaporean banks.The $3.36 billion loan will finance the construction of two new 1,000 megawatt units at the plant, which is located in Central Java.The project has been the target of years of protests from both international and local activists, and two French banks backed out of the co-financing deal. A consortium of Asian banks will provide US$3.36 billion in loans to support the expansion of the Tanjung Jati B coal-fired power plant project in the Jepara district of Indonesia’s Central Java province.Plans to expand Tanjung Jati B are part of a broader initiative that aims to add 35,000 megawatts to Indonesia’s electrical grid by 2019. The government is relying heavily on coal to meet this ambitious goal, with 117 new coal-fired power plants planned.The Tanjung Jati plant, and its expansion plans, have been the target of sustained protests from both local and international groups. The 2,640-megawatt plant began operating in 2006, and local fisherman say their catches —and, correspondingly, their earnings — have since declined.The planned expansion will add another 2,000 megawatts of capacity, drawing protests from activists who say the expansion further threatens the health and livelihoods of the surrounding communities.A coal power station in Jepara emits smoke and fumes into the surrounding landscape. Photo by Paul Hilton/Greenpeace.The financing agreement, announced last week, does not include two French banks which originally planned to provide loans to plant operator PT. Bhumi Jati Power (BJP).Société Générale reversed plans to fund Tanjung Jati B in accordance with the bank’s October 2016 pledge not to fund projects that are incompatible with the Paris climate agreements. Crédit Agricole, which was previously part of the co-financing arrangement, also does not appear in the announced list of participating banks.Both Société Générale and Crédit Agricole have been targeted by anti-coal protest campaigns in Europe.The final loan agreement for the Tanjung Jati B expansion was approved Feb. 24 by the government-owned Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), with backing from the “big three” Japanese commercial banks —Mizuho Bank, Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ and Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation — as well as other Japanese banks and Singapore’s OCBC.“This loan supports an overseas infrastructure project in which Japanese businesses will participate as investors and become involved in its operation and management for a long time by taking advantage of the country’s advanced technology. It will contribute to maintaining and strengthening the international competitiveness of Japanese industries,” JBIC said in a press statement.JBIC also noted that the newly constructed units will be “ultra-supercritical” – meaning they will employ technology that produces more energy per unit of coal than conventional power plants. As such, the bank said the loan “introduces efficient and environmentally friendly technology to Indonesia.”OCBC spokesperson Koh Ching Ching told Mongabay the bank does not comment on specific loans. “We adopt responsible financing practices that include social and environmental due diligence,” she said. “Accordingly, we require that our borrowers comply with local regulatory requirements and international standards.”Japan has faced criticism for its involvement in Indonesia’s coal industry. Here, a street theater performance is held in front of the Japanese embassy in Jakarta to protest Japanese financial institutions’ support of the Batang coal-fired powerplant in Java. Photo by Jurnasyanto Sukarno/Greenpeace.Activists have condemned the involvement of international banks in funding the project.“This is another big black mark for the Japanese government and for banks which are helping to build new coal power plants across Asia when doing so is totally incompatible with the Paris Agreement and a 2°C world,” Hozue Hatae, public finance and environment researcher for Friends of the Earth Japan, said in a press statement.“All the financial institutions involved will share the responsibility for the climate and health impacts of this project. Instead of further deepening Indonesia’s dependence on coal for decades to come, they must rather help the country develop its huge renewables potential,” added Yann Louvel, climate and energy campaign coordinator for the NGO BankTrack.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change Politics, Coal, Corporate Responsibility, Divestment, Energy, Environment, Fossil Fuels, Infrastructure last_img read more

Amid life and death risks, Brazil’s land defenders stand firm

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Featured, Fishing, Forests, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Rainforests, Rivers, Rubber They comprise a diverse range of people, from indigenous groups to fishing communities descended from rubber tappers.In 2015, more land defenders were killed in Brazil than any other country put together, according to watchdog organization Global Witness.Among land defenders, indigenous activists are the most-targeted for their work and activism. MUNICIPALITY OF ALTAMIRA , Brazil – Brazil has made headlines recently for almost entirely negative reasons — whether it is the on-going corruption scandal known as Operation Car Wash, which has taken down numerous politicians since 2014, or the staggering homicide rates that are tearing through the northeast of the country, where an average 16 murders occur daily.There is also the news of yet more precious forests being cut down in the country’s ever-expanding frontier; according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) deforestation spiked 29 per cent in 2016 – representing a 75 percent increase after a historic low in 2012. In short, Brazil has had a bad year — and it’s not getting any better.One by-product of this crisis is that Brazil is officially the most dangerous place in the world to be an environmental activist. As of 2015, more land defenders were killed in Brazil than any other country put together, according to Global Witness, a leading human rights watchdog organization. Indigenous activists were the most-targeted within that category. The latest figures from 2016 show that the situation is only worsening, with a 22 percent increase in assassinations and a 206 per cent increase in assaults, according to Brazil’s Pastoral Land Commission.The latest manifestation of this violence is grim. Earlier this month it was reported that 13 members of a tribe in the Amazonian state of Maranhao were hacked at with machetes by ranchers disputing their land. Just last week, on the 29th of May, 10 land rights activists that were members of the Landless Workers Movement were massacred by police who had come in to their settlement to investigate a murder case.Experts warn that the situation could become more dire as the current administration, which is dominated by the agribusiness and mining lobbies, attempts to dismantle key environmental safeguards that protect national parks and reserves where indigenous and Afro-Brazilian communities live.Meanwhile, numerous studies have proven that these communities, alongside landless peasants and small-scale producers, are the best custodians of the land. A recent report by Brazil-based research institute Imazon showed that privately-held land in Brazil had the highest level of illegal deforestation (at 59 percent) while indigenous people’s reserves and conservation units had the least, at 27 percent and 1 percent, respectively. Cattle ranching and the expansion of monoculture crops such as soy and eucalyptus are the primary drivers of this deforestation, say experts. Meanwhile, the UN reports that global competition for land and water linked to the demands of the global market and climate change are driving environmental degradation and violence.Yet despite this gloomy trend, Brazil’s land defenders – who comprise a diverse range of people, from indigenous communities to fishing communities descended from rubber tappers – are holding back against illegal logging, simply by living as they do. Though the “economic output” of these people is not highly valorized – if at all –  their way of life keeps the forest standing. By tapping the forest of its products on a seasonal basis, these smallholders act as a crucial buffer against deforestation and ecological destruction.Following is a snapshot of the lives of some of Brazil’s threatened land defenders, living in the country’s second largest state of Pará. “Xoba:” Rubber Tapper“Xoba” is 27 years old and lives in the Xingu Extractive Reserve. He collects Brazil nuts and taps rubber for a living. The Xingu Extractive Reserve, created in 2008, is vast piece of land owned and protected by the Brazilian state, which allows ribeirinhos – “river people,” like Xoba – to tap the forest of its products year-round.Xoba scores a Seringa tree. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Like everyone in the reserve, he has two names: his nickname, Xoba, and his real name, Manuel Barbosa Da Silva. He is by far the youngest rubber tapper in his reserve.Xoba sets out at 6 a.m. each day to extract latex from wild Seringa trees along a 4-mile long trail behind his home. The task takes over two hours, and on his return, a colleague goes out to collect the latex which has by then dripped into plastic cups fastened at the bottom of the tree. (On an average day he collects 5 gallons of latex).Xoba says he loves tapping rubber, because he can work in the cool of the shade and go home before midday to tend to the crop or go out fishing when he’s done on the trail.Most importantly, it is a way of life that can potentially last forever.“You have to treat the tree with care,” says Xoba. Wild rubber trees are very sensitive, he explains; they can only be scored once a day during the dry season – if a tree is cut too deeply, it dies. The trees that he has been scoring have many scars on their trunks from over a hundred years of being tapped for latex.Tapping wild rubber is a dying profession, and there are only three rubber tappers left in the Xingu reserve.There is hope, however. While many ribeirinhos (river people) living in the Xingu reserve chose to follow a different path – collecting Brazil nuts or fishing, or simply never learning the skill – there is now an incentive to re-learn it after a national firm, Mercur, signed a contract to buy latex from the community in 2010. (Wild latex is still prized as it produces the highest quality rubber that exists).Asked if he will teach his children the skill one day,  Xoba enthusiastically replied: “Of course!” He is already teaching his nephew.“Caboco:” FishermanJailson Juruna, 36, is a sharp-witted and charismatic member of the Juruna tribe. He is a proud father of five, and a fisherman, like the rest of his tribe. He traps fish using a net or an improvised harpoon that is fashioned from an iron bar like that found in the foundations of houses.Caboco holds an Acari fish on a Sunday fishing trip. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.The Juruna is an indigenous community that lives on the “Big Bend” of the Xingu River, a major tributary to the Amazon River. He is the second-chief of his community, in Murati, situated less than 10 miles downriver from the the world’s third largest dam, the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam – a multibillion-dollar mega development completed in 2015.The effects of the dam have been devastating for the community, having drastically reduced fish stocks – the staple diet for the Juruna – and changed their customs and means of subsistence.“Everything had always revolved around fish,” he says. “Now the river is dirty, and people are no longer buying the fish.” The Juruna have traditionally lived off several varieties of the Acari fish – eating some and selling others as ornamental fish in the nearby city of Altamira. The ornamental Acari Zebra is unique in that it is only found on the “Big Bend” of the Xingu, which has its own unique eco-system.Caboco and his community are currently in mourning. His younger brother, Jarliel Juruna, drowned in late November 2016 while attempting to dive for a prized species of Acari, which requires diving to depths of up to 20 meters (65 feet) with compressors. On this attempt, Jarliel’s compressors malfunctioned, and it was too late by the time he surfaced.Yet overall the Juruna community is resilient. They have embarked on an independent project that monitors fish stocks along the Xingu River, with the help of the Brazil-based Socio-Environmental Institute (ISA), and are holding Norte Energia to account for what they view as a disastrous compensation scheme (in 2015 the state public prosecutor’s office filed a civil lawsuit against Norte Energia accusing it of causing “ethnocide” because of the way it implanted it’s compensation scheme in the years of the dam’s construction). To date, the company has been sued $20 million dollars by the state for failing to comply with agreed-to licensing terms, along with other irregularities.Norte Energia has categorically denied these claims, as previously reported by Mongabay.“We are still fighting,” Caboco says. But he explains their next worry is a Belo Sun project – a Canadian-owned mining giant that has been acquiring land upriver from the Juruna’s reserve, and was recently given an operating license by the state (though it was then suspended in court by the public prosecutor’s office of Altamira). It is projected to be the largest open pit goldmine in Brazil and will use energy produced from the Belo Monte dam to run the mine.With the current political and economic climate in Brazil, it remains a David-versus-Goliath battle for the Juruna.“Sinha:” fisherman and woodworker“Sinha,” 40, is half Curuaia. His mother is from the Curuaia community, a neighboring tribe that lives on the other side of the Xingu River from him. He’s lived in this region his whole life and his family live by hunting, fishing and growing a small crop – while collecting Brazil nuts earn his family some money.Sinha, left, strips the Bacába fruit from its vine. The Bacába is a relative of the popular açaí superfruit. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Sinha lives within the Xingu Extractive Reserve and is a cantineiro – a manager of a trading post at Morro Grande. The Xingu reserve produces wild latex, Brazil nuts, and products from the Babassu nut, which is sold to major distributors across Brazil. He is one of three cantineiros in Xingu elected by his community to ship goods to and from the city, as well as keeping account for the community and paying the producers on the spot. It is a job with a lot of responsibility, and he takes a small percentage of the sale for fulfilling this role, though it is largely a symbolic amount.“Life is better now,” he says, referring to the creation of the reserve. Before it was created, Sinha’s community had no land rights and lived under threat from miners and loggers, as well as grilheiros (“land thieves”).His daily routine consists of waking up at 5:30 a.m., taking his kids to school on a handmade wooden boat and coming home in time for breakfast. He then sets out for the day to garden or hunt; before sundown, he works with wood, carving turtle-shaped stools, ornate paddles and fish-shaped cutting boards from salvaged portions of naturally-felled trees. At the end of the day, if there’s time, he goes out to fish.Though he is not a man of many words, it is clear that his passion is woodwork. Right now it is a hobby, he admits, though he hopes to spend more time making handicrafts to sell in the city.Pedro Pereira: Copaiba-collector and rubber tapperPedro Pereira de Castro, 52, is one of the few ribeirinhos in the region who doesn’t have a nickname, and it reflects his matter-of-fact character.“I worked in the city,” Pedro says. “But I never liked the city. My life has always been in the forest. I was born there and that is where I feel good.” Before the Resex was created in 2004, Pedro had worked as a gold miner, and with barely any education he couldn’t get any decent jobs in the city.Pedro Pereira (l) at his trading post. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim.He eventually educated himself and went back to the forest; he now taps latex from the wild Seringa tree and extracts copaiba sap – a medicinal and aromatic oil – from the Copaibera tree for a living, alongside fishing and hunting.He lives in Riozinho do Anfrisio Extractive Reserve, the first such reserve in the region, named after a rubber baron who previously owned the land that the reserve lies in. Pedro lives deep in the jungle with his family in an area that takes at least two days by boat to get to from the nearest city of Altamira.While he is not working in the forest, he works as a cantineiro, a manager of his community’s trading post. It is a relatively new approach to trading forest products, which he pioneered.The cantina allows the community to work collectively, as opposed to individually.Life has become much more secure for the riberinho families living in this reserve, who were often at the receiving end land-related violence. (Pará state, where Pedro’s reserve is, continues to have among the highest indices of homicide across the country, and also has the highest level of deforestation).To this day, Pedro’s reserve is being invaded and illegally deforested, but his community is holding out.Banner image: Caboco on a Sunday fishing trip. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Maximo Anderson is a freelance journalist and photographer currently based in Colombia. You can find him on Twitter at @MaximoLamar.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Guatemala provides an example of community forest management for Indonesia

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In Guatemala’s Maya Biosphere Reserve, 9 community forestry concessions have been managing over 350,000 hectares of forest for more than 15 years. The communities aim to manage the concessions sustainably, earning income from timber and non-timber forest products and tourism.Indigenous communities in Indonesia are currently in the process of mapping, titling and restoring their customary forests after Indonesian president Joko Widodo pledged to grant 12.7 million hectares for community concessions by 2019.Representatives travelled to Guatemala to learn how this has been done by communities in the Maya Biosphere Reserve.The Indonesian representatives hope to use the model of Guatemalan forest communities as a starting point for their own concession management. “We have the forest, which is the greatest. We give oxygen to all the country; not only to Guatemala but to the whole world,” she says with pride.At the end of dinner, members of the Indonesian delegation, which includes representatives of various organizations working in the forests of Sumatra, Java and Celebes in Indonesia departed, leaving only Arkilaus Kladit. A member of the indigenous community of Sorong del Sur, in the province of Papua, Kladit is small and tan, the quietest of his delegation. He only begins to speak when the rest of the group is gone.Wahid, a member of the Karang indigenous community on the island of Java, was one of the indigenous representatives invited to visit the RBM forest concessions. Indigenous communities in Indonesia are currently in the process of mapping, titling and restoring their customary forests. Photo by Carolina Gamazo“I’m from the Knosoimos clan. I am the first of nine generations to leave Papua. And in the forest I feel at home,” Kladit said. He is secretary of his indigenous council, one of the 1,118 recognized indigenous groups in Indonesia.The continuous forest of Papua is an exception in the archipelago nation. In 1900 it was estimated that 88 percent of Indonesian coverage was forest. During the 20th century — primarily since the 1970s — the islands began losing trees due to migration programs and uncontrolled deforestation practices for paper, cellulose and wood, as well as the aggressive entrance of the palm oil industry.Turning toward community forest managementBut in recent years, two factors have given Indonesian forests a chance at recovery.The first was a 2013 ruling by the Indonesian Constitutional Court in favor of the National Alliance of Indigenous Peoples (AMAN), recognizing the rights of these communities over their lands and forests, including collective rights on the customary forest. That refers to forests in ancestral domains that, according to this resolution, were not owned by the state but by the indigenous communities themselves.Then, in 2014, Joko Widodo was elected president, a move that many took as a governmental turn toward forest management.“He [Widodo] is a forestry professional, and he worked for many years in the sector,” Benjamin Hodgdon, forestry director at the Rainforest Alliance, said. “Now he has launched an entire program to grant 12.7 million hectares in concessions to communities before the year 2019.”The conservation NGO Rainforest Alliance has been providing technical support on forest concession management to forest communities in Guatemala for 20 years. Now it has organized a roundtable with Rights and Resources Initiative, a global network that defends the land and forest rights of indigenous people and communities. It has also partnered with three Indonesian organizations: Samdhana Institute, Kaoem Telapak and AMAN.The six Indonesian representatives who visited Guatemala were Mohammad Zainuri Hasyim, facilitator of Kaoem Telapak, an organization that works for the rights of the indigenous communities of Indonesia, from the island of Java. Muhammad Sidik represents UKIR, a forestry company in Lampung, Sumatra; Heri Susanto is with KWLM Kulon Progo and from Yogyakarta, Java. There were also three representatives from indigenous communities in addition to Kladit, who is secretary of Anggota Dewan Adat Knasaimos and from Sorong Selatan-Papua Occidental. He was joined by Wahid, from the Karang indigenous community who hails from Lebak-Constant, Java and Paundanan Embong Bulan from the Enrekang indigenous community of Enrekang —Sulawesi Selatan (Celebes).Muhammad Sidik, representative of the Ukir community forestry company in Lampung, Sumatra, walks through the urban core of the forest community of Uaxactún, which was born more than 100 years ago as the El Chiclero camp in the middle of the Maya Biosphere Reserve. Photo by Carolina GamazoSo far, however, concessions have sparked fears among Indonesian environmental activists.“The danger is that people in the forest communities will do what they want in concessions, and there might be a moment of chaos,” said Mohammad Zainuri Hasyim, forest facilitator at the organization Kaoem Talapak. “We could lose forest resources very quickly. Entrepreneurs could enter the area. It is important to be prepared.”Others, like Muhammad Sidik of the organization Unit Kreatif Industry Rakyat, Langung, on the island of Sumatra, believe that experience will play a key role.“Although the government now recognizes indigenous groups, and the fact that they can have legal status, they do not have forest management capacity at the moment,” Sidik said. “Furthermore, there is not yet a marketing or processing system for non-timber products such as coffee, honey, resins or rubber. There are also some problems in the market, with the marketing chain and the bureaucracy. That’s why we came here — because we want to see how the Petén Forest Communities Association (ACOFOP) partners manage the forest and how the communities were able to organize themselves and work together with the government to manage an area of forest,” he added.Managing a forest in a sustainable manner is a challenge for indigenous communities and international environmental organizations.“The important thing is that there is finally a platform that is being built by the community, and we are launching this project so that they can learn about different organization models when living in the forest —from forest management to building companies,” said Rainforest Alliance’s Hodgdon.Organizational framework: a key point for successSanta Elena in Petén is the region that houses the Maya Biosphere Reserve (RBM). Mario Rivas, the coordinator of productive development of the ACOFOP, explained to the Indonesian delegation how different concessions were obtained by different Petén forest associations, and how they have organized themselves over the years to manage them.Heri Susanto is a representative of the Indonesian organization KWLM Kulon Progo. “I came here to learn about forest management and see what I could implement in my community,” he said during the visit. Photo by Carolina Gamazo“The peace accords (1996) said that the state should give 100,000 hectares to community organizations for their management. That clause served as a basis to start the fight with the state to grant concessions to the communities,” Rivas said.In Guatemala, community forestry concessions began in 1994, four years after the creation of the RBM, with 2.1 million hectares of land. Currently, there are 11 community forestry concessions granted by the government, which manage a total of 500,000 hectares, a quarter of the area of RBM. Their responsibilities include managing both timber — principally mahogany and cedar — and non-timber resources, like the seeds of the maya nut or the xate palm. According to ACOFOP data, they obtain an approximate an annual income of $2 million.A sawmill at Uaxactún served as a stage for representatives of the forest organization of this community to explain to the Indonesian delegation how they have managed the different resources of the forest. Photo by Carolina GamazoWith assistance from forest management plans devised by the National Council of Protected Areas and the technical assistance of international environmental organizations, the concession area has the lowest fire activity in the entire biosphere. Studies conducted in the area indicate an uptick in the preservation of habitat, including more permanence of the mahogany tree.The key, explains Rivas, is organizational framework. Each forest community has an association with legal status through which it manages the resources of its concessions. All of them are in turn united in the ACOFOP, which puts pressure on the government.“We have filed protective actions in the Constitutional Court to stop law initiatives because the interests in this area are great,” Rivas explained. He added that communities implement joint development plans through ACOFOP.“We have the control and surveillance plan, the fire prevention plan, the investment plan and the monitoring or evaluation tools of the concessions, which are presented every year for the National Council for Protected Areas (CONAP) to approve the annual plan,” he said. Also, in 2003 they created Forescom, a company that carries out wood processing and wholesale sales.At Forescom headquarters, company general manager Spencer Ortiz spoke with Mongabay while guests from Indonesia examined the wood and the machines used for drying and cutting.“The communities are the owners of this company, but it maintains commercial independence,” Ortiz said. “More than half of their harvest is sold directly, and we form a joint venture if the businesses are profitable. We also have a financial mechanism through which we provide access to partners for capital or materials.”Sidik, Bulan, Arkilaus and Heri Susanto take notes on the ways the forest communities of Guatemala formed the forestry company Forescom in 2003. Photo by Carolina GamazoMembers of the Indonesia delegation said they felt like their time in Guatemala gave them a good starting point for their own projects.“I am very impressed by the way they have managed to form a community corporation,” said Zainuri Hasyim, the representative from Kaoem Talapak. “I am thinking about whether it would be possible to do something like this in Indonesia and how it would be different; how we are going to do it is quite a challenge.”Indigenous people and non-timber forest resourcesThe community of Uaxactún was the last to acquire a forest concession in the Maya Biosphere Reserve, and was also the least interested in the management of timber resources. This community, born as a forest labor camp where people lived and worked producing a kind of natural Guatemalan gum called chicle, had been living for more than 100 years off the non-timber resources of the forest. First, it was the resin of the chicozapote tree for chewing gum, and later the xate leaf, which is derived from three species of small palm (Chamaedorea elegans, Chamaedorea oblongata, Chamaedorea erumpens) and used ornamentally, mainly in churches.Since the age of 13, Jorge Soza has worked collecting resin for chewing gum in Uaxatún and is currently an advocate of non-timber forest products of the Petén Forest Communities Association (ACOFOP). In the photo, he shows visitors the xate leaf, one of the non-timber products that this concession sells. Photo by Danilo Valladares/Rainforest AllianceWhen the concession was granted, the community obtained 83,000 hectares – the largest concession in the reserve. The members managing of this concession are cautious with the wood they harvest, currently felling 600 trees a year while focusing most of their energy on alternative projects. Among these are the sale of xate leaves, the seed of the maya nut and community tourism. These projects have made a significant impact on employment and have also brought women — often excluded from production chains in rural communities— into the process.The sale of xate has allowed women to enter the production chain of the Uaxactún forest concession. A group of women selects and arrange the leaves of this palm to sell to churches. Photo by Carolina GamazoNon-timber products have attracted the most interest from representatives of Indonesian indigenous communities, who are currently mapping their territories as part of the One Map Initiative.As Hodgdon of the Rainforest Alliance explains, the mapping initiative, through which Indonesian communities will be able to title their ancestral forests, develops alongside forest concessions.“On the one hand, there is the president’s goal of granting 12.7 million forests under different local management modalities, with the understanding that the forest is of the state,” Hodgdon said. “On the other hand, there is the issue of mapping and titling. There are between 20 and 30 million hectares belonging to indigenous peoples. Already 14 titles have been delivered to date in more or less small areas, and we want to map, recognize, and title indigenous territories throughout the rest of the country.”In the case of indigenous people, there is a factor that complicates forest management: ancestral vision and forest-related spirituality.“In all of the indigenous rights there are laws that operate with the premise that the management of the forest remains intact,” said Paundanan Embong Bulan, community leader of Komunitas Adat Enrekang, one of the 37 indigenous communities of Sulwasi Solatan on Indonesia’s Celebes Islands. So far they have mapped three of their ten communities, or around 10,000 hectares.Bulan adds that in addition to the sacred forest, they have a “normal forest.”“You could manage it, as long as it is under customary law,” he said. “A cooperative for the coffee market, maybe that could be the future. ACOFOP is a good model and example, and we will show it to the head of the district.”Arkilaus Kladit is the first of nine generations of the Knosoimos clan to leave Papua, visiting Uaxactun, a community that manager a 83,000-hectare forest concession in the Maya Biosphere Reserve that seeks to serve as an example of sustainable forest management. Photo by Carolina GamazoFor Arkilaus, the meaning of the forest is similar.“The forest is our mother, everything we need to survive comes from the forest,” he said, and explained that in 2006 they carried out large-scale mapping of 96,000 hectares, mostly forest. Non-timber resources have the greatest draw, he said.“What has interested me most has been the right of the people to manage their forest. And, also, community organization, supervision regarding management, forest control, fire patrols, connection with markets and sale of non-timber products,” Arkilaus continued. In his case, land is communal. “The big difference is that everything is collective, or is inherited collectively through the clans; it comes from our ancestors. We have many holy sites.”Arkilaus holds seeds of the maya nut, which the community of Uaxactún sells in the form of flour, tea or cookies. Photo by Carolina GamazoThe organizational model of the Guatemalan forest communities provides a starting point to Indonesian forest representatives, who, despite the differences in forest vision and the different forms of ownership, seek the same as those in the Maya Biosphere Reserve: sustainable management of natural resources, where the human hand is not synonymous with the destruction of resources.“The experience in Guatemala, of course, will not be the same,” Hodgdon said “But the Central American country is the leader regarding forest concessions. It broke the scheme that said that to preserve land there could be no human intervention. Now we see that there can.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on April 26, 2017. Article published by Romina Castagninocenter_img Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights last_img read more

Halfway through the year, 2017 is on pace to be the second warmest on record

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Climate Change, Climate Science, El Nino, Environment, Research Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img June 2017 was the third-hottest June ever recorded, the 41st June in a row — and the 390th consecutive month — that saw the average global temperature rise above the 20th-century average.Not only that, but January-to-June 2017 was the second-hottest January-to-June ever recorded.All of which means that 2017 is on pace to be the second-hottest year since global temperature data first started being recorded in 1880 — and there’s not even an El Niño event this year to boost temperatures. June 2017 was the third-hottest June ever recorded, the 41st June in a row — and the 390th consecutive month — that saw the average global temperature rise above the 20th-century average.Not only that, but January-to-June 2017 was the second-hottest January-to-June ever recorded.All of which means that 2017 is on pace to be the second-hottest year since global temperature data first started being recorded in 1880 — and there’s not even an El Niño event this year to boost temperatures.According to scientists with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the average global temperature in June 2017 was 1.48 degrees Fahrenheit (about 0.64 degrees Celsius) above the 20th-century average of 59.9 degrees Fahrenheit (15.5 degrees Celsius). June 2016 was the hottest yet, and June 2015 was the second hottest.The average global temperature from January to June 2017 was 1.64 degrees Fahrenheit (0.91 degrees Celsius) above the 20th-century average of 56.3 degrees (13.5 degrees Celsius), NOAA reports, just 0.29 degrees Fahrenheit (0.16 degrees Celsius) lower than the record set in 2016.Joe Romm of ThinkProgress reported that these numbers have climate scientists particularly alarmed, as they come in a year when there was no El Niño event. Both 2015 and 2016 set new records, for instance, and a strong El Niño was partially to blame in each year.“Normally, the hottest years on record occur when the underlying human-caused global warming trend gets a temporary boost from an El Niño’s enhanced warming in the tropical Pacific,” Romm writes. “This matters because when a month  — or six-month period  — sees record high global temperatures in the absence of an El Niño, that is a sign the underlying global warming trend is stronger than ever.”As Romm noted earlier this year, 2017 already set “a remarkable new record for global warming” in March, the first month to exceed the 1981–2010 average by a full 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (one degree Celsius) despite there being no El Niño event.Climatologist Michael Mann told ThinkProgress, “As if it wasn’t shocking enough to see three consecutive record-breaking years, in 2014, 2015, and 2016, for the first time on record, we’re now seeing near-record temperatures even in the absence of the El Niño ‘assist’ that the previous record year benefited from.”Mann added that the NOAA data so far in 2017 serve as “a reminder that climate change has not, despite the insistence of climate contrarians, ‘paused’ or even slowed down.”Graphic courtesy of NOAA.last_img read more

Ranges for majority of world’s large carnivores have shrunk by more than 20 percent

first_imgThe red wolf’s (Canis rufus) global range, in particular, has shrunk almost entirely, with researchers quantifying the loss as 99.7 percent.The range for five other species has also decreased by more than 90 percent: Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis, 99 percent), tiger (Panthera tigris, 95 percent), lion (Panthera leo, 94 percent), African wild dog (Lycaon pictus, 93 percent) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, 92 percent).Researchers found that proximity to higher densities of rural humans, livestock, and cropland area made the decline of large carnivore ranges far more likely — a finding that would seem to contradict previous research showing that larger-bodied carnivore species are at greater extinction risk due to their need for larger prey and extensive habitat. Mankind poses a number of threats to the survival of large carnivores, from hunting, trapping, and habitat loss to outright persecution by humans, especially in conflicts around livestock.Many of these threats have been the subject of considerable scrutiny, but according to the authors of new research published in the Royal Society Open Science last week, no study has focused exclusively on range contractions for all large, terrestrial carnivores alive today around the world.The authors — Christopher Wolf and William Ripple, both researchers at Oregon State University in the United States — set out to fill that knowledge gap by comparing current range maps for 25 large carnivores, which they defined as species of 15 kilograms (33 pounds) or more in body mass, with historic range maps for those same species. Their analysis, the researchers write in the study, “provides several key insights into how best to conserve threatened large carnivore populations.”Wolf and Ripple found significant range contractions are common for the world’s large carnivore species, with 22 of the 25, or 80 percent of the studied species, having seen their range contract 20 percent or more. The red wolf’s (Canis rufus) global range, in particular, has shrunk almost entirely, with Wolf and Ripple quantifying the loss as 99.7 percent. The Ethiopian wolf’s (Canis simensis) range has declined by 99.3 percent. The range for four other species has also decreased by more than 90 percent: tiger (Panthera tigris, 95 percent), lion (Panthera leo, 94 percent), African wild dog (Lycaon pictus, 93 percent) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, 92 percent).African wild dog, whose range has contracted by 93.2 percent. Photo by Josh More, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.“With the exception of the red wolf, all 13 of the large carnivore species that experienced the greatest percentage range contraction are currently both threatened with extinction (IUCN Red List status ‘Vulnerable’, ‘Endangered’ or ‘Critically endangered’) and have decreasing population trends according to the IUCN Red List,” Wolf and Ripple note in the study.The six carnivores identified as having experienced the smallest contractions of their range were the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx, 12 percent), dingo (Canis lupus dingo, 12 percent), striped hyena (Hyaena hyaena, 15 percent), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta, 24 percent), grey wolf (Canis lupus, 26 percent), and brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea, 27 percent).The researchers did not include otters (Lutrinae) or polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in their analysis, as both are primarily aquatic species, not terrestrial. They also excluded the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) because they could not find a sufficiently accurate historical range map for the species.Wolf said that, based on their study of historical range maps, he and Ripple had determined that 96 percent of Earth’s landmass (not including Antarctica) once contained one or more large carnivores. Today, just 34 percent of the world’s land area contains all members of its historical large carnivore guilds.Lion range has contracted by 93.7 percent. Photo by Valentin Delaye, licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.Considering the fate of carnivores at the guild level — in other words, as a group of species reliant on similar resources — might be the key to crafting successful conservation strategies, Wolf told Mongabay. “Recent carnivore recoveries in Europe and the United States suggest a possible reversal of the long-term patterns of range contraction that we observed,” he said. “As major range contractions are common to most carnivores, conservation of entire guilds is critical to maintaining ecosystem function and preventing further extinctions.”Historical large carnivore richness was highest in South and Southeast Asia, where as many as nine large carnivore species once coexisted in some ecosystems, and in Africa, which once had up to six co-occurring species. So it’s no surprise that the greatest declines in large carnivore richness were in Southeast Asia and Africa, which both lost 2.9 species, on average, and the rest of Asia, which lost an average of 2.8 species. Oceania, Europe, and the Americas have all lost an average of one or less large carnivore species (though it’s worth noting that 100 percent of historic large carnivores have been lost in some parts of Europe and the Eastern United States, in addition to Southeast Asia).“We were surprised to see the extreme contractions for some of the large carnivore ranges,” Ripple told Mongabay. He and Wolf found that proximity to higher densities of rural humans, livestock, and cropland area made the decline of large carnivore ranges far more likely — a finding that would seem to contradict previous research showing that larger-bodied carnivore species are at greater extinction risk due to their need for larger prey and extensive habitat.Tiger range has contracted by 95.3 percent. Photo by Shawn Kinkade, licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.“Increasing human tolerance of large carnivores may be the best way to save these species from extinction,” Ripple added. “Also, more large protected areas are urgently needed for large carnivore conservation. We are not only losing the large carnivore species, but we are also losing their important ecological effects.”A 2014 study for which Ripple was the lead author found that maintaining “ecologically effective” numbers of large predators is crucial to the health of a diverse array of ecosystems. “Large carnivores deliver economic and ecosystem services via direct and indirect pathways that help maintain mammal, avian, invertebrate, and herpetofauna abundance or richness,” Ripple and his co-authors wrote in that paper. “Further, they affect other ecosystem processes and conditions, such as scavenger subsidies, disease dynamics, carbon storage, stream morphology, and crop production.”Wolf and Ripple stress in the Royal Society Open Science study that conserving what’s left of the world’s large carnivore guilds “can be accomplished… by expanding and strengthening protected area networks or by increasing human tolerance of predators.” Though growing rural human populations are driving range contractions, and further rural population increases are projected in the future, “many large carnivores are resilient, particularly when human attitudes and policy favour their conservation. This helps to explain the large carnivore recoveries observed in Europe and elsewhere (e.g. grey wolves in the continental United States).”Likewise, there might be ways to mitigate the impacts of expanding pastureland and agricultural land, they write: “[A]lthough our results associate increasing cropland and cattle density with range contractions, this relationship may be limited when predator-friendly agriculture methods are employed — an area where more research and practice is needed.”Andean black bear range has contracted by 75.2 percent. Photo by Chester Zoo, licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.CITATIONRipple, W. J., Estes, J. A., Beschta, R. L., Wilmers, C. C., Ritchie, E. G., Hebblewhite, M., … & Schmitz, O. J. (2014). Status and ecological effects of the world’s largest carnivores. Science, 343(6167), 1241484. doi:10.1126/science.1241484Wolf, C., & Ripple, W. J. (2017). Range contractions of the world9s large carnivores. Royal Society Open Science, 4(7), 170052. doi:10.1098/rsos.170052Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carnivores, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Mammals, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Brazilian firm wants to build new dams in Amazon’s Aripuanã basin

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Biodiversity Hotspots, Controversial, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img With the bancada ruralista mining / agribusiness lobby in control of the Temer government and Congress, a Brazilian company, Intertechne Consultores, sees it as an opportune time to revive a shelved plan to build dams in the Amazon’s Aripuanã basin.The company has asked federal officials to allow viability studies for 3 new dams in this very remote, biodiverse region — the Sumaúma and Quebra Remo dams on the Aripuanã River, and the Inferninho dam on its tributary, the Roosevelt River.The Inferninho dam, if built, would highly impact the Cinta Larga Indians, the victims of Brazilian-inflicted genocide in the 1960s. The Roosevelt Indigenous Reserve contains one of the world’s five largest diamond reserves, a cause of past violent conflicts.Moves may be afoot in Congress to end a ban of mining on indigenous lands. If passed, a new law could allow mining on Cinta Larga land, with new mines potentially powered by the new hydroelectric dams. These projects, if built, would likely be a source of intense new controversy and conflict in the Amazon. There are four dams already on the Aripuanã River. Intertechne Consultores wants to build two more there, plus one on the Roosevelt River, which could ultimately provide power to new diamond mines, should they be allowed in indigenous territory. Photo credit: Haka´s photos via VisualHunt / CC BY-NDA Brazilian company, Intertechne Consultores, has asked Aneel, the federal Agency for Electric Energy, to authorize viability studies to build three new dams in the Aripuanã river basin — the Sumaúma and Quebra Remo dams along the Aripuanã River itself and the Inferninho dam along its tributary, the Roosevelt River. The company provides consulting, engineering and construction management services for hydroelectric dams and has worked on several dams in the Amazon, including the controversial Belo Monte dam.The Aripuanã basin is considered one of the best-preserved regions in Amazonia with a high level of endemic plants and animals. While there are, as yet, no dams on the Roosevelt River, there are already four on the Aripuana, which is a tributary of the Madeira river, which flows north from Bolivia to join the Amazon at Itacoatiara.One of these existing dams — Dardanelos — has been controversial. In 2010, its builders dynamited a cemetery belonging to the Arara indigenous group, providing a foretaste of the controversy that erupted a few years later when a river rapids sacred to the Munduruku was blasted away to construct the Teles Pires dam in the Tapajós watershed.Major cataract near the Dardanelos dam on the Aripuanã River. Photo credit: Christopher Borges via Visualhunt / CC BYArara leader, Aldeci Arara, said at the time: “This was a big cemetery, which contained all our ancestors, many generations of our tribe, in the middle of the construction site. It is a sacred place for us.” Today, it is gone — something equivalent to blowing up the Vatican to build a road, indigenous experts say.The Brazilian government has been talking about expanding the hydropower network in the Aripuanã basin for some time. In April 2012, it said it was planning seven more dams there — four along the Aripuanã River, including Quebra Remo and Sumaúma, and three along the Roosevelt River, including Inferninho.However, the projects didn’t go ahead due to widespread criticism from environmentalists and indigenous supporters. Marcelo Cortez, WWF-Brazil’s conservation analyst at the time, said that the dams would impact the Mosaic of Southern Amazonia, created in 2011, which includes 40 conservation units covering seven million hectares (2,703 square miles).Indigenous reserves would also have been significantly affected.The controversial Dardanelos dam. In 2010, its builders dynamited a cemetery belonging to the Arara indigenous group, resulting in the Indians’ occupation of the dam in protest. Photo credit: Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC) via Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-SAEnergy experts, including Anderson Bittencourt, who worked then for the Department of Environment and Sustainable Development in the Amazonas state government, were critical of the large amount of forest that would be flooded in return for fairly modest quantities of energy. He said that Brazilian hydroelectric dams on average need to flood 0.5 square kilometers to generate 1 megawatt (MW) of electricity, but that the new dams would flood much more forest than this.Anxious to reassure critics, the president of Intertechne, Antonio Fernando Krempel, told the Estado de S. Paulo newspaper that it would be different this time. “We intend to carry out new studies. We will have a different approach … We know there are viable alternatives,” he said.Even so, Bittencourt’s concerns still seem relevant. The three new dams in question would flood 1,085 square kilometers (419 square miles) of forest, while generating just 1,035 MWs. In other words, about 1 square kilometer would need to be flooded to generate 1 MW — twice the average for Brazilian dams.Moreover, large areas of vegetation would be left to rot in the water, raising concerns about emissions of greenhouse gases. It is now understood by scientists that tropical dams contribute significantly to methane release, a greenhouse gas more than 20 times as powerful as carbon dioxide.Waterfalls on the Aripuanã River in Mato Grosso state. A Brazilian company, Intertechne Consultores, has asked the government to authorize viability studies to build three new dams in the Aripuanã river basin — the Sumaúma and Quebra Remo dams on the Aripuanã River, and the Inferninho dam on its tributary, the Roosevelt River. Photo credit: Cleber Rech via VisualHunt.com / CC BYMap of the Aripuanã and Roosevelt rivers. The Roosevelt flows north into the Aripuanã, which flows north into the Madeira River, which then flows to the Amazon. Map by Shannon under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2Perhaps the worst impact would be felt by the Cinta Larga Indians, who have suffered greatly from the arrival of outsiders on their land. Their territory would be directly impacted by the Inferninho dam on the Roosevelt River.These Indians first came to public notice when they shadowed the famed Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition, without ever making contact. The journey was undertaken in 1913-14 by Cândido Rondon, a military officer and explorer, renowned for his lifelong support of indigenous communities, and by former U.S. president Teddy Roosevelt and his son Kermit. Together, they worked out the route taken by the river to reach the Amazon. The near disastrous expedition attracted attention in the press, and even resulted in the river’s renaming, from Rio da Dúvida (River of Doubt) to the Roosevelt River.Although no violent incidents occurred during the expedition, the indians’ subsequent contacts with outsiders were far less peaceful. In subsequent years, the Cinta Larga were involved in a series of violent contacts with outsiders who entered their land to tap rubber, extract timber or mine for gold and diamonds.Teddy Roosevelt writes of the 1913-14 expedition: “We have had a hard and somewhat dangerous but very successful trip. No less than six weeks were spent… forcing our way down through what seemed a literally endless succession of rapids and cataracts. For forty-eight days we saw no human being. In passing these rapids we lost five of the seven canoes… One of our best men lost his life in the rapids. Under the strain one of the men… murdered [another] and fled into the wilderness.” Photo courtesy of Cornell University LibraryWhile the Rondon-Roosevelt expedition encountered no indigenous people along the river, wildlife didn’t fare as well. Colonel Roosevelt and the first jaguar killed. Photo courtesy of http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/trbrazil.htmlCândido Rondon, a military officer and explorer, renowned for his lifelong support of indigenous communities. Here, Colonel Rondon poses with the second jaguar killed. Photo courtesy of http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/trbrazil.htmlThe most notorious incident occurred in the 1960s when an unknown number of Cinta Larga, probably over three thousand, were killed. According to Ulisses Capozzoli, who worked with the Indians then, they were given food mixed with arsenic by local landowners, in cooperation with employees from Brazil’s Indigenous Protection Service (SPI), precursor of today’s indigenous agency, Funai. “They also flew over villages, throwing down toys contaminated with flu, measles and chickenpox viruses,” he recalled. It is widely considered one of the worst incidents of genocide in the history of indigenous contact in the Amazon.Toward the end of the century, the Cinta Larga began mining for diamonds themselves. In 2004, they murdered 29 non-indigenous miners who illegally entered their land to extract diamonds. The deaths caused a furore. A year of negotiations followed until federal authorities got the Indians to agree to close the mine in exchange for a government grant.However, with diamonds still in the ground, it seems unlikely these mineral conflicts have come to a permanent end. According to the Brazilian government’s Company for Research and Mineral Resources (CPRM), the Roosevelt Indigenous Reserve contains one of the world’s five largest diamond reserves.Senator Romero Jucá, a leading member of the rural caucus. In 1996 he presented a bill (PL 160/1996) to allow private companies to mine indigenous land. That bill is reportedly gaining support today in congress. Photo courtesy of WikipediaAt present, it is illegal to mine on indigenous land, but this could change. In 1996 Senator Romero Jucá, a leading member of the rural caucus that today controls over half the votes in Congress, presented a bill (PL 160/1996) to allow private companies to mine indigenous land. The bill, approved by the Senate then, has been languishing in the Lower Chamber ever since. Recent reports say that the measure has moved up the political agenda.If the bill is approved, there will undoubtedly be a new flurry of interest by mining companies in the diamonds lying beneath the Roosevelt Indigenous Reserve. It also seems logical that electricity generated by the new Inferninho dam on the Roosevelt River would be utilized to power any new mines in the area. All of this would open up this remote region for settlement, as new roads and transmission lines are built.With the Temer government and bancada ruralista, rural caucus in power, events could align quickly in the Aripuanã basin for a new rush by industry and government to profit from the Amazon’s mineral wealth and its hydroelectric potential. Observers also fear that the pieces are falling into place for renewed indigenous conflict: with the federal agencies dealing with indigenous and environmental affairs reeling from severe budget cuts, and with indigenous communities and their supporters, along with environmentalists, ready to resist big new infrastructure projects in this isolated, culturally and biodiversity rich Amazon region.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Through the Brazilian wilderness (1914) by Teddy Roosevelt: “We have put on the map a river about 1,500 kilometers in length… Until now its upper course has been utterly unknown to every one, and its lower course… unknown to all cartographers.” Of course, the so-called Rio da Dúvida (River of Doubt), was well known to the Cinta Larga Indians who lived all along its length, and who shadowed the Rondon-Roosevelt expedition unseen. The Cinta Larga have since suffered greatly due to invasions of their land by adventurers and companies seeking rubber, diamonds and gold. Photo courtesy of Cornell University Librarylast_img read more

Amazon’s giant South American river turtle holding its own, but risks abound

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Climate Change and Dams, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Global Warming, Green, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Mining, Monitoring, Overconsumption, Rainforests, Reptiles, Research, Threats To The Amazon, Turtles, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img The arrau, or giant South American River turtle (Podocnemis expansa), inhabits the Amazon and Orinoco rivers and their tributaries. A recent six nation survey assessed the health of populations across the region in Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru.The species numbered in the tens of millions in the 19th century. Much reduced today, P. expansa is doing fairly well in river systems with conservation programs (the Tapajós, Guaporés, Foz do Amazonas, and Purus) and not so well in others (the Javaés and Baixo Rio Branco, and the Trombetas, even though it has monitoring).The study registered more than 147,000 females protected or monitored by 89 conservation initiatives and programs between 2012 and 2014. Out of that total, two thirds were in Brazil (109,400), followed by Bolivia (30,000), Peru (4,100), Colombia (2,400), Venezuela (1,000) and Ecuador (6).The greatest historical threat to the arrau stems from eggs and meat being popular delicacies, which has led to trafficking. Hydroelectric dams and large-scale mining operations also put the animals at risk — this includes mining noise impairing turtle communication. Climate change could be the biggest threat in the 21st century. Adult Amazon South American river turtles in the La Virgen community, Arauca department, Colombia. Image courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society Colombia.In Venezuela it is called arrau; in Peru and Ecuador, charapa; in Brazil, tartaruga-da-Amazônia. Regardless of name, the Podocnemis expansa, or giant South American river turtle, as dubbed in English, has inhabited the vastness of the Amazon and Orinoco basins for centuries. To this day, the arrau as it is most commonly called, is the largest freshwater turtle in the region and one of the most consumed species — its meat is said to be delicious.Not surprisingly as a result, its population has been drastically reduced since the 19th century, when the species numbered in the tens of millions, according to historical estimates. Foreign naturalists from that time reported that it was virtually impossible to navigate the Tefé River, in Amazonas state, without a boat often hitting turtles swimming along the way. In recent decades, faced with imminent extinction in parts of South America, conservation initiatives were launched, especially in Brazil.However, neither those national, regional nor local efforts have had the capacity to survey populations across the species’ entire range — a vital process, biologists say, that gathers species baseline data and assesses threats in order to devise the best protection strategies.So in 2014 a group of researchers and conservationists from six Amazonian countries (Peru, Ecuador, Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia) came together in Balbina, in the Brazilian state of Amazonas, with the purpose of carrying out a range-wide survey.The meeting served as launch point for a sweeping study presented in the Oryx journal. The recently published results, The Future of the Giant South American River Turtle, Podocnemis expansa, highlighted conservation successes, registering more than 147,000 females protected or monitored by 89 conservation initiatives and programs between 2012 and 2014. Out of that total, two thirds are in Brazil (109,400), followed by Bolivia (30,000), Peru (4,100), Colombia (2,400), Venezuela (1,000) and Ecuador (6).Sites with ongoing conservation or monitoring activities for the giant river turtle (Podocnemis expansa) in the Amazon and Orinoco river basins, indicating the number of reproductive females estimated for each site. The size of the dots corresponds to the number of nesting females at each location. Credit Oryx, © 2019 Fauna & Flora International.Those current arrau statistics are cause for celebration, even though recent numbers fall far below the 1848-1859 accounting period, when 48 million eggs produced by 400,000 females were gathered annually from the upper Amazon, Solimões and Madeira rivers, primarily for export to Europe, said Germán Forero, the science director at Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Colombia and lead author of the recent arrau study.“It is good news that there are still large numbers of turtles in the Amazon and Orinoco basins, and that there is a large group of people and communities concerned with and investing in their conservation,” said Forero. “This represents a great opportunity for the species. Many communities want to preserve it for its use over time, as the [arrau] represents part of their diets and culture.”Still, he felt the need to temper that good news: “The figures cannot be interpreted without context. Those are the numbers of protected or managed females, [and] there are many more females in the basin [who are not well protected or managed]. Also, [as] the numbers used to be much higher, it does not mean the species is recovering. Some populations seem to be [doing] so, while others seem to be going down. That is why the effort to gather information for long-term monitoring is so important.”With the study complete, the research team’s next goal is to develop an observatory that could monitor specimens and understand trends across the region, while also serving as a repository for all data gathered, and technical information and lessons learned, across the six Amazon countries. All of that information would be available for public access.Amazon river turtle hatchling leaving the egg on Jacaré beach in the Trombetas River Biological Reserve in Pará state, Brazil. Image by Camila Ferrara.Arrau lifeThere are some nights when 300 females come out together from the water to spawn,” recalls Camila Ferrara, study co-author and a WCS Brazil researcher. She’s referring to the time of year when the animals leave igapós, lakes and rivers and migrate to nesting beaches, sometimes traveling up to hundreds of kilometers to lay eggs. The Guaporé River, which begins in Mato Grosso state, hosts one of the longest journeys the arrau makes, travelling to the Bolivian department of Beni, where the stream name changes to the Iténez River, in a region that shelters the largest protected P. expansa population outside Brazil.After nesting on river beaches, the females don’t leave, as with other turtle species; instead, they await the hatchlings for months so that mother and off springs can return together to their home aquatic habitat. It is the only species known to have such a behavior.Unfortunately, this natural sociability makes the species and its eggs more vulnerable to human predation. And visible these animals certainly are: an adult female reaches up to 1.09 meter (3.5 feet) in length and 90 kilograms (198 pounds) in weight. Adult males measure between 0.4 meters (1.3 feet) and 0.5 meters (1.6 feet).The Tucuruí hydroelectric power plant in Pará state, Brazil. Image by PPGEDAM (NUMA/UFPA) Visualhunt.com CC BY-NC.Arrau threats: traffickers, dams, mining companiesThe IUCN Red List currently places the arrau in its “Unspecified” category, noting that the species’ population is extremely fragmented with “continuing decline of mature individuals,” and requiring more research and conservation action. Though not classified as endangered on the Red List, it is listed on CITES Appendix II: “Not necessarily now threatened with extinction, but that may become so unless trade is closely controlled.”Among the 89 P. expansa program study sites, the new research found wide variations in population trends, even within the same nation. In Brazil, for example, the Amazon Chelonian Program run by IBAMA (the country’s environmental agency), learned that monitored areas (including the Tapajós, Guaporés, Foz do Amazonas and Purus river systems) experienced an increase in nesting females between 1980 and 2014, while in generally less monitored river systems (including the Javaés and Baixo Rio Branco, but not the Trombetas which was fairly well monitored, numbers fell).“The Baixo Rio Branco [in Roraima state] is considered one of the most dangerous areas to work [with conservation]. It is called the ‘pirate river’ because it attracts many turtle traffickers and an IBAMA official was murdered in the region a few years ago,” Ferrara told Mongabay.According to the biologist, threats to the species include the predatory hunting of females and eggs, the flooding of beaches caused by hydroelectric dams, and mining operations near turtle habitat. A case in point is the Trombetas River Biological Reserve which is adjacent to the Mineração Rio do Norte — the nation’s largest bauxite producer located on the banks of the Trombetas River, in Pará state. Bauxite is utilized to make aluminum.“For maritime transportation, the mining company had the river dredged, and those interferences likely disrupt turtle communication,” explained Ferrara. In the 1960s and ‘70s, the Trombetas River Reserve was one of the most important arrau spawning areas in Brazil, boasting 6,500 adult females. Today they are less than 600.“The number of born hatchlings also depends on [having sufficient] resources for oversight and monitoring, but under the current [Jair Bolsonaro] government resources have decreased significantly,” added Ferrara.Managing arrau threats is also complicated by the species’ behavior. For example, during her doctoral work, the researcher learned that P. expansa females and their offspring communicate in and out of the water. “Sounds were emitted by hatchlings in the egg, in open nests, in the river, and in captive conditions. Adult females were recorded producing sounds in the river, while basking, while nesting, and in captivity. Females were recorded in the river approaching and responding to hatchling sounds,” notes the study. Researchers believe that noisy mining operations could disrupt those communication patterns.In a recent study Ferrara concludes: “Noise pollution from human activities, once thought to be irrelevant in turtle conservation, may now generate some concern. Noise produced by ships, boats, jet skis, and other motorized watercrafts may affect the reception of sound by turtles and potentially interfere with their communication, to such a degree that it has a negative effect on hatchling survivorship and adult communication.”Currently Ferrara is utilizing satellite imagery and vocalized sound recording to investigate how and when turtles communicate with each other, with an eye toward how that knowledge might be utilized to enhance conservation efforts.Podocnemis expansa hatchlings heading to the Rio Crixás-Açu in Goiás state, Brazil. IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, released over 83 million hatchlings of different turtle species from 1979 to 2018 through its Amazon Chelonian Program. Image by Luiz Alfredo Batista/IBAMA.Turtle lives in fluxAnother human influence impacting the arrau: climate change is altering temperatures, rainfall patterns and hydrology in Brazil’s 11 large nesting areas and, as a consequence, impacting the reproductive capacity and success of P. expansa, as well as other species.“There has always been a certain annual variation in the number of turtle births due to climate and human pressure. Climate change may be impacting those populations more broadly, though,” Roberto Lacava told Mongabay. He is IBAMA’s environmental analyst and the national coordinator for the Amazon Chelonian Program.Climate change alters the rainfall regime, Lacava explains, which in turn alters river water levels, with extreme precipitation events causing the flooding of nests before hatching. Freshwater turtle females depend on decreasing river levels so that nesting beaches are exposed and nests can be built. When river levels rise rapidly, flooding the nests before the hatchlings are born, the eggs rot and the number of births decline.“That happened on the Monte Cristo tabuleiro [turtle nesting beach, in Pará] in the 2018/2019 season, when 78 percent of the nests were lost due to atypical flooding,” said the analyst. Extreme weather isn’t the only cause of such events: large water releases from hydroelectric dams can similarly flood downstream nest sites, unless dam operators control releases during nesting times.Arraus arriving to nest at the Monte Cristo tabuleiro (nesting beach) in Pará state, 2017. Image by Roberto Lacava/IBAMA.Arrau reproductive productivity can also be affected by the climate crisis through a complex sequence of events. The giant South American turtle is predominantly herbivorous and depends on the rising of river levels to create forest floods (called Igapós) during which fruits and leaves fall into the rivers, offering up easily accessible food for the chelonians. But during climate change-intensified drought, when river levels don’t rise sufficiently to flood, the turtles’ feeding is compromised and the animals have less energy to reproduce. Again, dams that withhold water releases at the wrong times can have a similar effect.“The future of the Amazonian turtles in the face of climate change is worrisome,” said Lacava. “For an animal that has evolved so synchronously with the water regime of the Amazon basin — so that both its reproduction and food are directly affected — it is difficult to trace any prognosis that is not catastrophic.”“Some measures can mitigate those impacts, such as raising artificially the level of the beaches, but they have controversial results and high costs to be implemented,” concludes Lacava. So it is that the long-term survival of the arrau not only hinges on Amazon region conservation, but also on international action to curb climate change.Citations:Forero-Medina, G., Ferrara, C., Vogt, R., Fagundes, C., Balestra, R., Andrade, P., . . . Horne, B. (n.d.). On the future of the giant South American river turtle Podocnemis expansa. Oryx, 1-8. doi:10.1017/S0030605318001370.Bates, H.W. (1892) The Naturalist on the River Amazon. John Murray, London, UK.Zwink, W. & Young, P.S. (1990) Desova e eclosão de Podocnemis expansa (Schweigger, 1812) (Chelonia: Pelomedusidae) no Rio Trombetas, Pará, Brasil. Forest, 90, 34–35.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Northern Lights Raceway to host first diesel-powered drag races

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Northern Lights Raceway is going to be hosting a weekend of drag races in July, though the vehicles involved won’t be powered by Otto cycle engines.Raceway president Mark Brush says that in just over two weeks’ time, the 1/4 mile drag strip will be hosting the first ever weekend of diesel drag races. The event is being put on in conjunction with Pro Street Automotive, and the competition will require racers’ engines to run on the spontaneously combusting fuel. The race rules will be the same as those set up by the NHDRA.Brush says that in addition to races, there will also be a dynamometer set up for racers to test the power of their machines. He says that so far, there are approximately 30 drivers that have signed up to race, but the event is open to the public. Anyone with a diesel truck will be able to take it down the track provided the vehicle is clean and can pass a tech inspection.- Advertisement -For more information, contact Northern Lights Raceway or Pro Street Automotive via their respective Facebook pages.last_img read more

‘Celtic are the greatest football team in the land’

first_imgEach week, a leading band or musician takes our special talkSPORT Q&A. Up today, it’s Celtic fans GUN…1) What’s your favourite talkSPORT Show and why?My favourite talkSPORT show is Colin Murray’s. He has great knowledge about sports in general and football, and has a real passion for music too. He’s funny and witty, I really love listening to his show.2) talkSPORT gives you your own show, what’s it’s called and what’s it about?It would be called “Soccer To Rocker” and be about footballers who love their rock music and their musical influences… would they have tried to become musicians if they hadn’t succeeded in becoming footballers? That kinda thing!3) Who are the greatest football team in the land?For me the greatest football team in the land are my beloved Celtic, who have a great history and following. We’ve had many great footballers and legends like Kenny Dalglish, Jimmy Johnstone, Henrik Larrson, but at present I think Real Madrid take some beating.4) Who is the most rock ‘n’ roll player playing the beautiful game right now?Thing is, with footballers a lot of them aren’t very rock ‘n’ roll. Some of their taste in music is really dreadful! The best player in the world is Ronaldo, but if only his music taste waste as good as his football… He likes R Kelly, Ricky Martin, what’s that all about? So for me the most rock ‘n’ roll player in the beautiful game right now is Iniesta, who’s a massive fan of Kasabian, so much that he had them round his house for some beers.5) If you were put in charge of the pre-match entertainment for the FA Cup final at Wembley, what band do you want playing live?The Foo Fighters, a band that are so good live and know how to entertain, have great songs and are the pinnacle of rock music this present day.6) Who’s gonna sing the National Anthem?If he was alive today it be Freddie Mercury, so I’m going for Mick Jagger.7) What track are the players walking down the tunnel and onto the pitch to?David Bowie’s ‘Heroes’.8) What’s on the stereo in the dressing room to psyche the players up?‘Another One Bites The Dust’, ‘Heroes’, ‘Rock The Casbah’, ‘London Calling’, ‘Du Hast’, ‘Back In Black’, ‘Times Like These’.9) You build your own rock ‘n’ roll five-a-side team, who’s in it?Kasbian’s Serge up front as he reminds of Samaras, who used to play for Celtic. Alongside him I’d have Steve Harris of Iron Maiden because he is a great footballer, Robbie Williams has great skill, Johnny Marr could’ve turned pro, and of course Rod Stewart, who’s a mad Celtic fan.10) You get to pick one footballer to work as roadie with your band. Who is it and what do you have them doing?My favourite footballer ever Diego Maradona, the most incredible footballer I’ve ever seen. What would I have him doing? I’d have him telling me all his stories in his footballing career and off the field, too, then after sound check or backstage I’d have him showing me some of his amazing football skills. My hero!11) What’s going on with you as an artist at the moment?GUN are bringing a new album out March 23 which is called ‘Frantic’, we are rehearsing for a tour to coincide with the album and single release so we’re very exited. Anyone who wants to catch up and find more about the dates we’re playing then look us up on www.gunofficial.co.uk or Gun Official Facebook! GUN’s new album Frantic is released March 23 2015. Check out http://umusicdirect.com/gun/ 1 Gun’s new album Frantic is released March 23 2015 last_img read more

Prolific MK Dons teen sent on loan to Conference North side Corby Town

first_img MK Dons teen hotshot Kabongo Tshimanga 1 MK Dons teen hotshot Kabongo Tshimanga has been sent on loan to Corby.The 18-year-old, who joined the club almost a decade ago, hit the headlines last season when he bagged 36 goals for the Under-18s before Christmas.That form earned him an 18-month professional contract with the option of a further year and he has since spent time on loan at Aldershot.Now MK Dons have decided to let Tshimanga leave on loan once again and he will join National League North side Corby for the next month.last_img