At 2017 minimum, scientists ask: Is Arctic entering the Thin Ice Age?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Climate, Climate Change, Climate Science, Environment, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Green, Impact Of Climate Change, Monitoring, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Sea Ice, Temperatures Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img The decline of Arctic ice didn’t set a record this year, with sea ice extent coming in eighth after record-setting 2012. On September 13, at the summer minimum, sea ice covered 4.64 million square kilometers; that’s 1.25 million square kilometers more than 2012.However, that fact was overshadowed by another: experts say what matters most in the Arctic is the total volume of ice — a combination of thickness and extent. 2017 saw summer volumes among the lowest ever recorded.The Arctic set still another record that concerns scientists: no other 12-month period (September 2016 to August 2017) has had such persistently low sea ice extent.The Arctic ice is therefore showing no signs of recovery, scientists say, and its decline is likely continuing to impact the Earth’s weather in unpredictable and destabilizing ways. The sun reflects over thin sea ice and a few floating icebergs near the Denmark Strait off of eastern Greenland, as seen from NASA’s P-3B aircraft on April 14, 2012 — the record year for Arctic ice melt, so far. Photo by Jefferson Beck / NASAAfter 16 months of consecutive record and near-record lows in late 2016 and early 2017, sea ice extent in the Arctic held fast over the summer thanks to more moderate weather and cooler temperatures. As of September 13, sea ice covered some 4.64 million square kilometers (1.79 million square miles) at its minimum, roughly 1.25 million square kilometers (482,000 square miles) more than record-setting year 2012.Still, while 2017’s summer melt season didn’t break the record, it falls far below the 1981 to 2010 median extent by over 1.58 million square kilometers (610,000 square miles). Moreover, surface cover isn’t everything when it comes to the state of the Arctic — what experts say matters most is the total volume of ice — a combination of thickness and extent, and 2017 saw summer volumes among the lowest ever recorded.Some scientists are now saying colloquially that the Arctic Ocean has in recent decades entered the “Thin Ice Age.” Since 1980, the average ice thickness come July has decreased by an estimated 120 centimeters (47 inches).Notably this July, the average sea ice thickness in the Arctic was equivalent to the lowest on record. Global sea ice area (Arctic and Antarctic) 1978 to 2017. Graphic by Kevin PluckSo in spite of a slight rebound in summer extent, the average Arctic sea ice volume was still 47 percent below the 1979 to 2016 mean. That is not only likely bad news for the future of Arctic ice and polar ecosystems, but also for a stable global climate, which is highly influenced, and possibly unbalanced by events up North. Climatologists, for example, postulate that jet stream blocking, an effect hypothetically caused by a warming Arctic, could have stalled Hurricane Harvey over Houston.This year’s thinner, slushier ice is more vulnerable than the past’s thick, multi-year ice, and it melts out rapidly during a spike in temperature or intense cyclonic activity. That’s why, even at the end of August, scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center weren’t quite ready to call how 2017 would shake out compared to previous summers. Last year, they noted, took a sudden nose dive around the same time.“It was pretty unique going into the [2017] melt season, that we had had so many record low sea ice extents and thickness estimates all suggested we had quite thin ice and low ice volume,” says Julienne Stroeve, senior research scientist with the National Snow and Ice Data Center. “You would tend to think that maybe we’d have another record low, but what this summer has shown is that’s not enough to just have thin ice.”Indeed, summer weather conditions have a larger impact on summer sea ice cover than the extent of the winter maximum going into the season. At least, that is the case, so far, with the ice record.U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Beaufort Sea, northeast of Barrow, Alaska, collects sea ice data. Arctic ice extent, area and volume have both continued to decline drastically, though unevenly, since around 2005. Photo by Kathryn Hansen / NASA“Even if you have really thin ice at the start of the melt season, it’s still not quite thin enough where it wouldn’t matter what the summer weather patterns were,” continues Stroeve. “It’s not been a particularly warm summer in the Arctic; it’s been pretty stormy, lots of cold-core cyclones have come in, and that has helped to limit the ice melt.”But atmospheric temperatures are not the only temps that matter. Sea surface temperatures were higher than normal in coastal regions, melting the ice from the sides and from below —reducing thickness through heat exchange and wave action.While total sea ice volume is ultimately a more important climate indicator, circumpolar volume has not been observed as continuously as extent, which has been monitored daily via satellites since 1979. While scientists can cobble together scattered volume observational data points from Navy submarines, buoy moorings, field measurements, and satellites, these are limited in number in both space and time.Rather, to determine reductions in volume over time, scientists have input what observations they have into varied numerical models which estimate sea ice volume over several decades. One of these modeling programs has estimated that sea ice volume declined by 4,291 cubic kilometers (1,029 cubic miles) between the end of the summers of 2003 and 2012.Scientists scout for a location to collect data on sea ice in the Chukchi Sea. Continued decline of Arctic ice, due to human-caused climate change, is hypothesized to be a factor in the destabilization of Earth’s weather patterns. Photo by Kathryn Hansen / NASAThough sea ice extent was holding steady in mid-September, whether or not that will have any impact on this winter’s extent remains hard to say, says Stroeve. Because winters have been getting warmer and warmer, she expects there will still be delays in sea ice formation this autumn — especially in the Chukchi Sea, which melted out early in 2017.The NOAA National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center states that due to extensive open water this summer, air temperatures over the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas and along the North Slope of Alaska will likely be far above average through autumn.And while summer sea ice extent didn’t hit any record lows this year, it didn’t exactly bounce back either. “We [didn’t] have a record low, but [2017 is] still among the lowest we’ve recorded,” says Stroeve. According to NSIDC, 2017 came in at the eighth lowest extent since recordkeeping began in 1979. Also, no other 12-month period (September 2016 to August 2017) has had such persistently low sea ice extent.“We’re not seeing any sort of recovery in the sea ice. Even if we have an average summer like this one — there was nothing remarkable in the air temperatures — but we still were among the lowest. I think that’s where thickness comes into play,” said Stroeve. “We’re not recovering to the conditions we saw in the 1980s or 1990s and that is because the thickness of the ice has gotten to the point where you’re not getting any recovery anymore.”What seems fairly certain is that, so long as humanity continues piping greenhouse gases at a staggering rate into the atmosphere, Arctic ice volume will continue deteriorating, and the global climate will continue destabilizing. The Arctic, say researchers metaphorically, is increasingly skating on thin ice.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.IceBridge Over the Weddell Sea. IceBridge, a six-year NASA program, is the largest airborne survey of Earth’s polar ice ever flown — yielding a three-dimensional yearly view of Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice and giving researchers a better understanding of fluctations in polar ice volume and thickness. IceBridge is meant to serve as a continuity mission until NASA’s ICESat-2 launches in late 2018. ICESat-2 will monitor sea ice thickness from orbit, utilizing a new generation of space-based laser remote sensing instruments. Photo by Michael Studinger / NASAlast_img read more

Bats key pollinators for durian production, camera traps confirm

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Bats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, cameras, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Evolution, Forests, Hunting, Mammals, Pollinators, Rainforests, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Traditional Medicine, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by John Cannoncenter_img A new study employing camera traps indicates that flying foxes in Malaysia are important pollinators of commercially valuable durian fruit trees.The researchers set 19 traps in semi-wild durian trees.Their investigation revealed that the bats had a positive impact on the transformation of the flower to fruit. Camera trap footage has shown, for the first time, that a threatened bat species in Malaysia is an important pollinator of durian trees (Durio zibethinus).Past research in other parts of the world has shown that certain bats do pollinate durian trees, and insects may also play a role. But until now, scientists weren’t sure whether large fruit bats — known in Malaysia as “flying foxes” — were a help or a hindrance to durian trees’ production of fruit.“When I saw all this incredible video footage from our camera traps, showing the flying foxes feeding on durian nectar without actually destroying the flowers, I was completely mind-blown,” said Sheema Abdul Aziz, a conservation ecologist and president of Rimba, a Malaysian conservation NGO, in an email. “I had to really reassess my assumptions about these bats.”A camera trap image of an island flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) amongst durian flowers. Photo ©Rimba, courtesy of Sheema Abdul Aziz / RimbaSheema led a team of researchers who set out to understand what impact these large-bodied bats might be having on such a critical staple of the local diet in Peninsular Malaysia. Durian fruit, known for its pungent — and some might say off-putting — aroma, is adored by some for its taste. In many villages in Malaysia, locals tend to descendants of the naturally occurring, wild variety of the tree.With the help of a group of expert climbers from the organization Tree Climbers Malaysia, Sheema and her colleagues installed 19 camera traps in four of these “semi-wild” durian trees. They reported their findings online in September in the journal Ecology and Evolution.Flying foxes have a bit of a bad reputation for being impeding the production of durian and other types of fruit trees, though there is little evidence that that’s the case. Farmers often worry that these bats might damage commercially valuable fruit like durian, casting the bats as pests and leading to efforts to eradicate them. In some cases, governments have even authorized bat culls, Sheema said, “which can have a disastrous impact not just on the bats but also on the ecosystems that they help to shape and maintain.”Durians for sale in Malaysia. Photo ©Pierre-Michel Forget, courtesy of Sheema Abdul Aziz / RimbaHunting pressure, along with hunting for traditional Chinese medicine and some specialty restaurants, has led to a disconcerting drop in their numbers in Malaysia. The IUCN lists the subject of this study, the island flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus), as a species of Least Concern. But that broad designation doesn’t tell the whole story, Sheema said.“This is based on global data, as this flying fox species is widely distributed,” she said. “This listing does not reflect the situation in Malaysia where flying foxes are in a much more precarious situation.”At the same time, scientists don’t know much about how these bats fit into the ecosystem in this part of the world.“I was surprised that so little research has been done on this in the Southeast Asian region, and that the role of flying foxes is so poorly understood,” Sheema said. “I really wanted to start investigating the interactions between flying foxes and plants, and the implications for human well-being.”Durian flowers in bloom. Photo courtesy of Sheema Abdul Aziz / RimbaResearch in other places has indicated that bats aren’t as harmful as many people suppose, she said. In one unpublished study centering on fruit bats in Mauritius — which sanctioned a bat cull several years ago — scientists found that a related flying fox (P. niger) only damaged a small amount of fruit.“More damage was actually caused by birds, wind, and failure to harvest fruits at the proper time,” she said.Sheema had a hunch that flying foxes might instead be quite beneficial to durian production.“These are such huge bats that can carry big fruits over long distances, so I was convinced that they must be playing an important ecological role in tropical ecosystems,” she said. What’s more, “The structure and size of durian flowers are perfectly suited to bat pollination.”Sheema and her colleagues found that the durian flowers pollinated by flying foxes developed into healthy fruit.The study demonstrates that island flying foxes, pictured here, are important durian pollinators. Photo ©Sheema Abdul Aziz / Rimba“Some farmers actually blame bats for removing or destroying durian flowers and fruits, which they believe causes poorer fruit production,” she said. “Nothing could be further from the truth!”Her team’s research, Sheema said, bolsters the case for protecting, rather than killing, flying foxes, as a drop in their numbers may impact how many durians a tree produces, or perhaps the size and taste of the fruit.“It’s possible that both quantity and quality may be affected by bat declines,” she said. “But we don’t know for sure yet. This is definitely something that I’m hoping to find out by doing more studies on durian pollination ecology.”An island flying fox hangs in a tree. Photo ©Marcus Chua, courtesy of Sheema Abdul Aziz / RimbaCITATIONSAziz, S. A., Clements, G. R., McConkey, K. R., Sritongchuay, T., Pathil, S., Yazid, A., … & Bumrungsri, S. (2017). Pollination by the locally endangered island flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) enhances fruit production of the economically important durian (Durio zibethinus). Ecology and Evolution.Banner image of island flying foxes ©Sheema Abdul Aziz / Rimba.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonlast_img read more

Indonesians race to save their disappearing lakes, before it’s too late

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Seventeen lakes in the Southeast Asian nation are in “critical” condition. One of them, Lake Limboto in northern Sulawesi, is shrinking rapidly and could disappear by 2025.Recently, government officials and researchers from across Indonesia gathered on Lake Limboto’s shores, declaring that a national agency should be established to handle the issue. In December they will meet again, hoping to attract the attention of President Joko Widodo.One of the most pressing problems at Limboto is the lake’s shrinking increases the risk of flooding in nearby Gorontalo city. LAKE LIMBOTO, Indonesia — Anton Kui has fished here since he was in fifth grade. He remembers he could quickly catch a day’s worth of fish close to his home.That was the 1970s, when this lake in Gorontalo province, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, was twice the breadth and almost three times the depth it is today.“Now, a full day does not guarantee even 10 fish,” said Kui, who heads a small local fishermen’s association, Citra Neyalan. “Only the lucky ones get more.”In addition to the fishing community, the lake supports a budding tourism industry and almost 50 species of transcontinental migratory birds that travel annually from Siberia to Australia.But deforestation in the mountains around Lake Limboto is filling it with millions of tons of sediment every year, raising the lakebed and increasing the risk of flooding in surrounding areas. That’s the biggest reason researchers now predict the lake will cease to exist by 2025.Gorontalo province (green) in Indonesia (yellow). Image via Wikimedia Commons.The problems plaguing Lake Limboto are not unique to Gorontalo. Seventeen of Indonesia’s lakes are classified as being in “critical” condition, meaning they suffer a host of environmental problems, chief among them sedimentation that causes shrinking.After decades of inaction at Limboto, efforts to save not only this lake but others like it are racing ahead.Two months ago, government officials and academics from across the archipelago country gathered on Limboto’s shores to find a solution for Indonesia’s critically endangered lakes. They declared to Jakarta that a national body should be created to direct attention and funds to the nation’s more than 800 lakes.The declaration was heard. A delegation of district chiefs and academics from seven provinces met with the Regional Representatives Council, one of two houses in the nation’s bicameral parliament, in the capital last month, and they will meet again in December to discuss the possibility and details of a national institution to oversee the issue.The delegation hopes its discussion will result in a final meeting with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo to create the tentatively named Forum Daerah Peduli Danau Nusantara, or the Archipelago Lakes Regional Forum. Nelson Pomalingo, the head of Gorontalo district, said in an interview that the institution’s purpose would extend beyond his jurisdiction.“We aren’t just talking about Lake Limboto — we are talking about all lakes in Indonesia,” said Pomalingo, who is also a professor of agriculture. “Until now, we were just discussing among the district chiefs, but now we are bringing it to the national level.”Shrinking lakesLake Limboto is an example of what is happening to other critical lakes in Indonesia, Pomalingo said, as deforestation and aquatic weeds accelerate the draining of the lake, threatening the local economy and wildlife.In 1932, the lake spanned 70 square kilometers (27 square miles) and had a depth of 30 meters (98 feet). By 1970, it had shrunk to 50 square kilometers and 8 meters deep. Today, the lake measures just 25 square kilometers and is only 3 or 4 meters deep.Government-subsidized corn farmers in the mountains surrounding the lake frequently clear forest, but don’t return to a plot of land after it has been used, said Hasim, a professor who will join the delegation in December and uses only one name. Twenty-three rivers carry soil into the lake from nine subdistricts and 70 villages.Invasive water hyacinths also cover much of the lake’s surface. Kui, the fishermen’s association chief, noted that water hyacinths the size of a small table could grow to fill a room in a matter of weeks.Fishing huts on Lake Limboto. Photo by KrisNM/Flickr.In addition to dumping more material on the lake floor, the free-floating plants accelerate the evaporation of water and decrease the amount of oxygen in the water. During the 2012 dry season, researchers found that water hyacinths had spread across 51 percent of the lake’s surface. Government estimates put that figure even higher.But some fishermen propagate the water hyacinths to attract the fish that are becoming harder and harder to find, and the government is having trouble stemming the practice.“Our goal is to decrease the area occupied by the water hyacinth, but we have to work with the fishermen,” said Bambang Supriyanto, secretary of the district’s planning agency. “To change their habits, we need strong efforts, including education about how to use the water hyacinth.”The government’s biggest fear, however, is the flooding that increasingly threatens nearby Gorontalo city. The lake came into being as a flood-inundation basin, meaning if it disappears, rainwater must find somewhere else to go.“Because of this higher sedimentation in the lake, we can’t afford to have rain anymore. There are floods every rain during the rainy season,” said Dony Lahati, head of the public works department in the district. There is only one outlet from the lake into the sea, managed by a dam.Humans are not the only species affected. Rosyid Azhar, a photographer, spent one day a week monitoring birds at the lake during this year’s migration season. He’s seen birds from the Arctic and Australia stop at this equatorial lake. Normally 85 species live here, 49 of them migratory.“This year, not as many birds came to the lake as in past years, neither the number of individual birds nor the total number of species,” Rosyid said. More research was needed to understand why, he added, but it was already clear the government’s project to dredge the lake was disturbing the traditional habitat, possibly deterring birds from stopping at Limboto.“The government is trying to clean up the water hyacinths but they throw away all the vegetation,” said Pantiati, biodiversity officer with Burung Indonesia, the local affiliate of Birdlife International, an NGO. “And now if you see the lake … just water and water.”The government says the solution must make use of “local wisdom” such as simpler fishing methods, raised homes that “respect” the lake, and ways to make use of plants in the lake.The other lakes in “critical” condition include Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Lake Rawa Pening in Central Java, and Lake Jempang in East Kalimantan.Lake Toba, the world’s largest volcanic lake, on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Photo by Axel Drainville/Flickr.Redirecting controlGorontalo district’s planning agency said the project had already begun to restore Limboto to its previous state, although flooding is still becoming more prevalent.The project includes a budget of 600 billion rupiah ($44.4 million). Excavators dredge the lakebed and make some of the mud available to be made into bricks. President Jokowi promised late last year to speed up the dredging process at an estimated cost of 11 trillion rupiah ($770 million).But the district says the biggest problem is regulating housing on Limboto’s shores. As the lake has shrunk, new dwellings have cropped up in the newly cleared space. Dony, the district official in charge of public works, said the government incurs high costs buying the land from these owners, assuming they are willing to give it up.The Ministry of Land and Spatial Planning controls the issuance of land certificates, but Dony said it had issued too many deeds, impeding the restoration process. Additionally, when Gorontalo was designated a “conservation province,” planning was redirected to the central government. As a result, a masterplan written in 2005 has not yet been put into effect because stakeholders are unclear who would take the lead.“From the [district’s] perspective, the policy is ambiguous,” said Bambang, the district planning-agency official, “because when we intervene in the lake, we have to go through regulations from Jakarta.”“Now these regions are coming together to build from the bottom up, because so far the central government has been the one saying where the money goes,” said Pomalingo, the district chief. “But the regions are the ones sustaining the lakes.”A hopeful future?Rahman Dako, an environmental activist who often works with the government, lamented that it took five years under the current district head’s leadership to get things moving.“Solving the problems of the lakes in critical condition cannot be accomplished just through meetings,” said Rahman, who grew up on Limboto’s shores. “What’s needed for the lake now is knowing which concrete actions to take, for example those regarding logging” in the mountains.Representatives from Samosir, Maninjau, Semarang, Wajo, Bangli and Agam districts, at least, are also planning to join the December meeting in Jakarta. Thirty-four were invited.Fish farms line the edge of Lake Maninjau, West Sumatra. It too is in critical condition. Photo by Ben Pitler for Mongabay.Hasim, who has advocated for protection for Limboto for 25 years, initially hesitated to join the delegation to Jakarta. The solution, he says, is really to identify the community and educate the major stakeholders on the lake itself. The problem, he says, is people like fishermen don’t know they are damaging their own source of income.Some farmers have found new uses for the land that was previously underwater, but fishermen, Hasim said, are already struggling to adjust. Kui said he understands that fishermen are losing their livelihood, but he remains defiant that the lake will not be lost.“I often attend meetings for fish cultivation groups,” he said when asked if he was worried about the lake drying up, “and I say, hey, Lake Limboto wasn’t made by man, it was God’s creation.”The critically endangered lakes:1. Lake Toba2. Lake Maninjau3. Lake Singkarak4. Lake Kerinci5. Lake Tondano6. Lake Limboto7. Lake Poso8. Lake Tempe9. Lake Matano10. Lake Semayang11. Lake Jempang,12. Lake Melintang13. Lake Sentarum14. Lake Sentani15. Rawa Danau16. Lake Batur17. Lake Rawa PeningBanner image: A fishing boat floats near a cluster of water hyacinth in Lake Limboto. Photo by Marwan Mohamad/Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Birds, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Fish, Fishing, Flooding, Forestry, Forests, Invasive Species, Lakes, Rainforests, Restoration, Sedimentation, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

Zambia halts plans to dam the Luangwa River

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Dams, Environment, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Megafauna, Rivers, Wildlife center_img WWF reports that the Zambian government has cancelled a pre-feasibility study for a dam on the Luangwa River, the Ndevu Gorge Power Project, which would have cost $1.26 billion and generated between 235 and 240 megawatts of power if completed.More than 200,000 people had signed a petition calling for the legal protection of the river. Critics of the dam project argued that fragmentation of the Luangwa would threaten wildlife and freshwater fish stocks, as well as the agriculture and tourism that local communities rely on.A study recently published in Nature found that two-thirds of the world’s 242 longest rivers are no longer free-flowing, mainly because so many of them have been fragmented by dams. The government of Zambia has halted plans to build a hydropower megadam on the Luangwa River, one of the longest remaining free-flowing rivers in southern Africa.WWF reports that the Zambian government has cancelled a pre-feasibility study for the Ndevu Gorge Power Project, proposed by MDH South Africa (Pty) Limited, which would have cost $1.26 billion and generated between 235 and 240 megawatts of power if completed. The government’s decision effectively puts an end to the project, WWF said, calling the outcome “a major boost for communities and wildlife.”The 1,100-kilometer (about 684-mile) Luangwa lies at the bottom of a wide rift valley in Zambia’s Eastern Province, where it is surrounded by both natural landscapes and encroaching human development.Two large, iconic national parks are located along the river: South Luangwa National Park and North Luangwa National Park. The river supports an abundance of megafauna, including Zambia’s reintroduced black rhinos, elephants, hippos, leopards, lions, and the endemic Thornicroft’s giraffe, as well as more than 400 of Zambia’s 732 species of birds.A local fisherman casting his net on the Luangwa River, Zambia. © James Suter / Black Bean Productions / WWF-US.Some 25 chiefdoms also rely on the Luangwa River for water, food, and livelihoods. The entire economy of the Luangwa Valley, based primarily on tourism and agriculture, is reliant on the river.“I wish to thank [the] government for listening to our plea as Luembe has the potential to become another area of wildlife tourism in a few years,” Senior Chief Luembe of the Nsenga people said in a statement. “The dam would have disturbed the free movement of wildlife in the Luangwa Valley. There are other means that can supply an equivalent amount of electricity like solar power and windmills that can be installed along the Muchinga escarpment, with less damage to the environment.”More than 200,000 people had signed a petition calling for the legal protection of the river. Critics of the dam project argued that fragmentation of the Luangwa would threaten wildlife and freshwater fish stocks, as well as the agriculture and tourism that local communities rely on.According to a preliminary study of the environmental impacts of the proposed dam prepared in 2017 by scientists at California State University, Monterey Bay, if the Ndevu Gorge Power Project were to be completed, it would “irreversibly alter the free-flowing Luangwa River in Eastern Zambia.”Luangwa river in Zamiba is rich in birds and other wildlife. © James Suter / Black Bean Productions / WWF-US.The study states that “The reservoir would inundate 29.5% of the length of the Luangwa River within South Luangwa National Park, at least six safari camps, and as much as 80% of adjacent hunting areas. It would inundate portions of at least six chiefdoms adjacent to the river. The reservoir would inundate much of the length of the Luangwa that these protected areas, hunting areas and chiefdoms currently have access to. It would also reduce the area of valuable wildlife corridor between South Luangwa National Park and Lower Zambezi National Park — which is already bounded by human encroachment on either side of the river — by 50% of its length and 24% of its width.”The dam would likely have caused a number of hydrological impacts upstream and downstream of the reservoir, as well, according to the study: “Potential impacts include: backwater effects, delta formation above the reservoir, channel incision, floodplain isolation and disruption of sediment transport mechanisms.”A study recently published in Nature found that two-thirds of the world’s 242 longest rivers are no longer free-flowing, mainly because so many of them have been fragmented by dams. WWF’s Living Planet Report 2018 determined that freshwater species have experienced an 83 percent decline globally since 1970, the most severe population reductions found for any group of vertebrates, and that diminished river connectivity is one of the chief drivers of those losses.“Keeping the Luangwa river free flowing is the best decision for both people and nature, and WWF commends the government for halting the dam and instead seeking lower impact, renewable alternatives to power Zambia’s development, ” Nachilala Nkombo, WWF Zambia Country Director, said in a statement.Elephants in the Luangwa river, Zambia. © James Suter / Black Bean Productions / WWF-US.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Small-scale farming is a big threat to biodiversity in the western Amazon: Study

first_imgSmallholder farming poses a significant threat to biodiversity in the western Amazonian forests of northeastern Peru, one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, a study led by researchers at Princeton University has found.Small-scale agricultural operations are generally considered to be much less harmful to wildlife than the wholesale clearance and conversion of forests to pasture or cropland, but the study, published in the journal Conservation Biology in May, shows that small-scale farmers’ activities are having a substantially negative impact on wildlife and plant life all the same.Plans to build more roads in the northern Peru could exacerbate the situation, but the researchers say their findings have important implications for conservation policy in the western Amazon region and could help point a way towards mitigating the impact of future development. Smallholder farming poses a significant threat to biodiversity in the western Amazonian forests of northeastern Peru, one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, a study led by researchers at Princeton University has found.In the southeast Amazon, large-scale, mechanized farming and ranching are driving forest loss, but smallholder slash-and-burn agriculture is the primary driver of forest destruction in the western Amazon, considered to be the largest intact tropical forest wilderness remaining on Earth. Small-scale agricultural operations are generally considered to be much less harmful to wildlife than the wholesale clearance and conversion of forests to pasture or cropland, but the study, published in the journal Conservation Biology in May, shows that small-scale farmers’ activities are having a substantially negative impact on wildlife and plant life all the same.The study looks at the species composition and distribution of birds and trees in the Amazonian lowlands of Peru’s Loreto Department. Lead author Jacob Socolar is a bird expert who led the research as a Ph.D. student while working in the lab of David Wilcove, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Princeton and a co-author of the study. Together with Elvis Valderrama Sandoval, a botanist at the Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, Socolar and Wilcove examined four habitat types where small-scale slash-and-burn agriculture is taking place — upland forests, floodplain forests, white-sand forests, and river islands — and compared their findings in those areas with relatively untouched, primary forests.“We wanted to know how tropical biodiversity responds to smallholder agriculture across the wide range of different forest habitats that typify tropical forest landscapes, and the Western Amazon is a good place to ask these questions,” Socolar, who completed his Ph.D. in 2016 and is now a postdoctoral researcher with the Norwegian University of Life Sciences and the University of Sheffield, said in a statement.He added: “We called the paper, ‘overlooked biodiversity loss’ because the situation at the landscape scale is worse than we would’ve guessed by studying one habitat at a time.”Lead author Jacob Socolar in an intact floodplain forest, one of the sites studied. Photo courtesy of Jacob Socolar.Using bioacoustic recordings and visual observations, the researchers recorded 455 total bird species in their study sites (making it one of “the richest single-observer point-count datasets ever assembled” for birds, the researchers note in the study). The team also identified 751 total tree species during the course of their field work. But it was the different patterns of responses to small-scale farming exhibited by birds and trees that became a defining feature of the study, Socolar said.The researchers found numerous bird species in areas that had been slashed-and-burned — in some cases, these farmed areas had even more species present than comparable sites of intact forest. But once all observations had been counted and analyzed, intact sites were found to harbor significantly more bird species than farmed sites. Disturbed areas were only used by a limited number of species, Socolar and team discovered, whereas species composition in intact sites varied across the different forest habitat types they studied, leading to a much higher number of species overall being present in those areas.Socolar and co-authors note in the study that these biodiversity losses would not have been detected had they not focused on multiple habitat types: “These overall losses are invisible to studies that focus solely on upland (terra firme) forest.”The team found a far less nuanced response by trees to small-scale farming. Their observations showed, perhaps unsurprisingly, that far fewer tree species persist on cleared land than in intact forests. The researchers suspect that fewer tree species in disturbed sites also means fewer insects and other small animals, which would have serious implications for the region’s entire ecosystem.Jacob Socolar walks through a smallholder collective’s plantation of an Amazonian fruit called Camu-camu. The floodwaters were beginning to rise. Photo courtesy of Jacob Socolar.“Smallholder agriculture turns out to be a very serious threat to biodiversity, closer in impact to clearing the forests for cattle pastures than we had imagined,” Wilcove said in a statement. “What’s worse is that smallholder agriculture is the dominant form of land-use change in Western Amazonia, and it is likely to get more widespread in the coming decades.”The researchers say their findings have important implications for conservation policy in the western Amazon region. One potentially exacerbating factor of biodiversity loss from smallholder agriculture operations could be the construction of new roads. The authors cite the example of the Interoceanic and trans-Amazonian highways of Peru and Brazil, which “promoted rapid smallholder expansion along their routes,” and note that “plans exist that would dramatically alter the roadless character of much of the Peruvian Amazon. Furthermore,” they add, “most of western Amazonia is covered in hydrocarbons concessions, the development of which would provide additional road access for settlers.”The study’s findings could help point a way towards mitigating the impact of future development in the region, the researchers write in the study: “Overall, our results show that the continued expansion of smallholder farming will substantially erode western Amazonian biodiversity. However, in the context of one of the most intact and least populated tropical forest landscapes on Earth, we are optimistic that proactive planning can meaningfully conserve regional biodiversity.”The key, the researchers say, will be to ensure that policies that promote smallholder agriculture in the western Amazon are implemented in such a way that they limit expansion of forest conversion rather than encourage it.“Even though smallholder agriculture supports high biodiversity at small spatial scales, we cannot lose vigilance regarding the overall threat posed by smallholder expansion,” Socolar said. “If we do, we pay a price in extinctions. We want this study to serve as a larger warning. It’s probably not just a fluke of the Amazon — these findings could extend to other habitats. We’re lucky to work in a place where there is still plenty of land to go around for both farming and conservation. Being proactive is possible, moral and reasonable.”Jacob Socolar, lead author of the study, conducts a point-count in a smallholder farmer’s banana cultivation. Photo courtesy of Jacob Socolar.CITATION• Socolar, J. B., Sandoval, E. H. V., & Wilcove, D. S. (2019). Overlooked biodiversity loss in tropical smallholder agriculture. Conservation Biology. doi:10.1111/cobi.13344FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Birds, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Farming, Forests, Research, Slash-and-burn, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Bid to allow sale of ivory stockpiles rejected at wildlife trade summit

first_imgA proposal by Botswana, Zimbabwe and Namibia that would have allowed them to sell their ivory stockpiles has been rejected by 101 votes to 23 at the CITES wildlife trade summit taking place in Geneva.Populations of elephants in Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and South Africa are placed in Appendix II of CITES, which allows commercial trade in registered government-owned ivory stocks, with the necessary CITES permits in place.But such sales are severely restricted by a legally binding annotation to Appendix II, which Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe’s proposal sought to amend.Several other African countries opposed the proposal, saying that the one-off sales permitted under the annotation in 1997 and 2008 had failed and sparked a poaching frenzy, negating the argument that flooding the market with legal ivory would drown out the illegal trade. A proposal by Botswana, Zimbabwe and Namibia that would allow them to sell their ivory stockpiles has been rejected at the ongoing summit of the global wildlife trade body.Countries meeting in Geneva for the 18th Conference of the Parties (CoP18) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted 101 to 23 to reject the proposal.All African elephants (Loxodonta spp.) have been listed on Appendix I of CITES since 1989. This prohibits the global commercial trade in the animals and their products. Populations of elephants in Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and South Africa were eventually moved to Appendix II, allowing certain commercial trade in elephant products, including that of registered government-owned ivory stocks, with the necessary CITES permits and checks in place. The sale of ivory stocks, however, is severely restricted by a legally binding annotation to Appendix II. Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe’s proposal sought to amend the annotation to create more opportunities for them to trade ivory internationally for commercial purposes.“The decisions today by the Parties at CITES CoP18 mean it’s status quo for elephants: No international commercial ivory trade is permitted and that is what needs to happen,” Susan Lieberman, vice president of international policy for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), said in a statement. “CITES Parties agreed not to open any ivory trade, and to further call on governments to close their domestic ivory markets. We thank the CITES CoP18 Parties for not weakening their policies concerning elephant ivory. All Ivory trade must end if the African elephant is to recover.”Under the Appendix II listing, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe were allowed to sell agreed-upon quantities of registered government-owned ivory stocks in two one-off sales: once in 1999 to Japan, and a second time to Japan and China in 2008. The annotation, however, placed a moratorium on further commercial ivory sales by the four countries until 2017.At CoP17 in South Africa in 2016, Zimbabwe and Namibia submitted proposals seeking to delete the entire annotation to the Appendix II listing for their countries. This time around, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe proposed eliminating sections of the annotation that specify which stockpiles can be traded, as well as the stay on future sales.Several African countries opposed the proposal, saying that the 1999 and 2008 experiments had failed and sparked a poaching frenzy.A study published in 2016 reached the same conclusion. The one-time legal sale in 2008 was based on the idea that flooding markets with legal ivory would reduce the demand for illegal products. However, researchers found that the legal sale was followed by a dramatic rise in ivory smuggling and elephant deaths. This rise in black market ivory production could have been triggered by both increasing consumer demand and the reduced cost of supplying black market ivory, the researchers posited.“Poaching skyrocketed across Africa after the last ivory stockpile sales back in 2008,” Matt Collis, director of international policy at the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and head of IFAW’s delegation at CITES, said in a statement. “IFAW is delighted governments at CITES have chosen to reject repeating that failed experiment. Any legal market in ivory presents opportunities for the laundering of illegal ivory. We have yet to see any evidence that legal ivory trade is being adequately controlled to prevent this happening.”A counterproposal by Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Kenya, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan, Syria and Togo sought to transfer all elephant populations to Appendix I, offering them the highest protection. That proposal was defeated, 67 votes to 51, the Guardian reported.Banner image of African elephants by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Criminal Lawyer Jason Doe Solves: The Case of the Presumed Gambler

first_imgThe court reconvened at exactly 2p.m. and Judge Trobe called the prosecution to recall the witness, Sam Monday back to the stand. Sam Monday returned to the witness stand was sworn in and Lt. Bono walked leisurely to the witness, and to the spectators surprise said, “That’s all I have no further questions for the witness,” and turning to the defense table, said, with a bit of sarcasm in his voice, “You may cross-examine the witness,” and strolled to the prosecution table.  Defense Counsel Jason Doe who seemed to be occupied with his thoughts moved towards the witness and with hesitation grinned at him, allowing the witness to readjust his position in the box. The lawyer hesitated for a couple of seconds and then allowed the momentary silence to sweep across the courtroom. Dramatically, he secured the spectators’ attention as sudden hush engaged the room. Perhaps it was deliberate as the lawyer kept his gaze on the witness in what anyone watching with extreme caution would have realized was a tactic of intimidation, the kind that bothered on surprise. Jason Doe knew it was a case based on circumstantial evidence. His only trump card would be to shake the recollections of the witness and the lawyer was prepared to burst the case wide open. And so as the courtroom held in silence, Jason Doe began his cross examination in a disguised consoling voice, that pretended it was interested in the welfare of his antagonist in the box. The crowd listened with keen attention when the lawyer asked the witness, “Your name is Sam Monday?” The question disarmed the witness and relaxing with a sense of expectation, said, “Yes.” There was an undertone murmur of surprise in among the spectators, as the lawyer hammered his question one after the other.“And you testified in court that you are a compulsive gambler?”The witness smiled and shifted in his position, and lowered his head briefly and lifted it to glance at the prosecution’s table as if he needed some reassurance of what was coming to him. There was a mild smile at the corner of his mouth when he said: “I have been gambling the greater of my life.”That was apparently what the lawyer had expected and so he gave his answer a momentary thought over, and repeated the question, “It is either yes or no,” but Lt. Bono was on his feet, “Your Honor, this line of questioning suggests that Counsel is employing a leading question with the intent to trap the witness since he may not be prepared for Counsel’s method of insinuating the possible…”“The Court is firmly aware of the procedure and therefore the prosecutor should let counsel exhaust his questions since the Court is cognizance of the method,” Judge Trobe interrupted, “on the issue of leading questions, the Court does not want to remind the prosecutor that he had the opportunity to let the witness tell the Court what he knew to be a fact.“Unless the prosecution finds it unreasonable to follow the trend of defense counsel’s questioning, he will have to raise his objections and leave the Court to act upon.”“Thank you, Your Honor,” the prosecutor said, “I wanted to make sure that the defense counsel does not employ some of his draconian methods and go fishing out information without proper foundation laid.”Judge Trobe said, “The Court cannot entertain any interruption from the prosecution except what the Court took pain to explain of which the prosecution is clearly aware.”“Thank you, Your Honor,” Lt. Bono said, and gave Jason Doe a side glance of his face. The lawyer did not show his annoyance but heard Judge Trobe’s instruction.“Counsel may continue with your cross-examination.”  Jason Doe, a little elated of the judge’s rebuke of the prosecution, said, “Thank you, Your Honor,” and turned swiftly to face the witness.“You told the court that you have been gambling much of your life?”“Yes.”“Anthony Dawson,” the lawyer said, “is your friend?”“Yes and no.”“He was your friend when he met you at the Lovers’ Inn the night of September 10?”“Yes and that was why I accepted his offer.”“And his offer was for you to drink on the house?”Smiling, the witness said, “Yes.”“When he said it was on the house, it meant simply that you could drink free?”“That’s exactly what he meant.”“And so you drank free?”“Yes.”The lawyer moved back to the defense table and pawed through some papers, and returning to the witness, said, “What question did you ask the defendant that you told the Court ‘his father would not get what he wanted in life’?”The witness again, hesitated and looking at the lawyer with brooding eyes, said, “I just figured something was wrong the way he came to the Inn.”“And so when you judged him by his appearance you knew something was wrong, did you not?”“You hit the nail right on the head.”The lawyer smiled.“Is it yes or no, Mr. Monday?”“It is yes.”“But until then you had no idea that something bad had happened to the decedent?”  He shifted once again in the witness stand, looked around him, folded his hands in front of him, and turned his head to stare at the judge’s bench. The witness hesitated, and then said, “Yes.” The lawyer went on a frontal attack, “Why did you hesitate in your answer Mr. Monday?”“I thought you wanted to trap me.”“Do you have any motive that you thought I would expose?”“I don’t want you to link me with the death of Mr. Dawson and I am also afraid that you could link me with anything that is missing from the house.”“Is there any way that anything could have been missing in the house?”“Well,” the witness said, “the man was a rich man and he could get his money stolen.”The courtroom echoed laughter at the witness answer, and the judge’s gavel sounded twice and calm was restored immediately.The lawyer went on the attack, nonetheless.“In your relationship with the defendant, did you at any other time request him to credit you money?”“Yes.”“How much was it?” “It is not part of this case.”Judge Trobe lowered her glasses on her nose, and said, “The witness will answer the question.”“It was US$750.00.”“How long now, since you received the money?”“Six months ago.”“When did he expect you to settle the payment? In other words when were you expected to pay the money?”“Five months ago.”“What did he tell you after you failed to pay the money in the sixth month?”In a voice that spectators had to struggle to hear him, the witness said, “He reported me to his father who threatened to send me to jail if I don’t pay the money.”“Was it not because you insulted him when he approached you on why you did not pay the money?”“I did not mean to insult him.”“But you insulted him?”“I did it out of anger.”“And you threatened him that you were not afraid to go to jail, did you not?”“I was just joking with him.”“Your joke was a threat and how you did not care about going to jail?”“These things happen,” the witness said, evading the question, but Jason  Doe kept the pressure on.“You visited the defendant on the night of September 10 and did not find him at home?”“Yes.”“Why did you hide in the closet when the decedent arrived?”“I was afraid that seeing me at his house could let him call the police.”The lawyer turned to the judge and smiled, and strolled back to the defense table. The defendant, with his eyes wet with tears glanced at the lawyer.The lawyer grinned and threw him a wink.Tears filled his eyes, and the lawyer torched his shoulder, and said, “It’s going to be fine.”The brief silence unsettled the witness in the stand, as he fidgeted with his hands and his empty gaze settled on the prosecution table.Judge Trobe moved swiftly to rescue the situation and realizing that there was no probable cause to hold the defendant and bound him for trial, she readjusted her dress.Gazing at defense counsel Jason Doe, she said, “It seems now apparent that the preliminary trial is come to its natural conclusion, for the case with too much circumstantial evidence has reached a point where the witness has found his testimony has tumbled in falsehood and innuendos.“In the search for justice for the decedent and his family, the Court has come to accept the reality that the chief witness had some motive and it is evidently clear that he had his own hands in the cookie jar, while he was testifying against an innocent man.“With what has happened so far, the Court will take an extreme action in which the witness who had presented himself as the good angel was involved as we have gathered through the brilliant performance of defense counsel Jason Doe.“The Court therefore has no moral ground to hold defendant Anthony Dawson, and the Court, as its honorable position is, to uphold justice for victims and their families, is releasing the defendant to the care of defense counsel Jason Doe while at the same time ordering Sam Monday detained and it so ordered.” The EndShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

LWSC Needs US$56M to Replace Damaged Pipeline

first_img– Advertisement – MD says this will restore running water to Central MonroviaHun Bu-Tulay, Liberia Water and Sewer Corporation (LWSC) managing director, said to restore active running water to the City of Monrovia, the entity has appealed for US$56 million to replace the damaged 36-inch, 21-kilometer transmission line at the Water Treatment Plant in White Plains, outside Monrovia.On a recent guided tour of the facilities with a team of journalists, Mr. Tulay said the lifespan design of the pipeline is ‘completely finished’ and as a result, residents will always face shortages of water supply, “because pressure from the pump has become weak.”He said the pipeline failed on the underside where the reinforcing rods had failed and the rebar has also resulted in steel plates. Tulay said that the failures resulted from the pipe’s internal pressure to the extent that no work was done on them when they occurred recently.Failed concrete sections being repaired by LWSC“We have determined that the failed section can be repaired and the repair work is now in progress. The work should be completed soon,” Tulay assured the public. However, he informed the public that the section of the pipeline that was damaged has been repaired and is pumping water to parts of Monrovia. He said to supply the entire city, the entity needs to replace the entire pipeline transmission.In one of his briefings to the Board and the Cabinet, Tulay informed them that the pre-stress concrete pipe portion of the transmission pipeline from White Plains to White Flower had outlived its lifespan of 50 years, as it was constructed in 1966.“As far back as 1985, the entity was advised to replace the two transmission mains—the 16 inches routed through Bushrod Island and the 36 inches routed through Johnsonville and Paynesville, because the lines were old and nearing the end of their designed life.Old LWSC pipelines that need to be replaced“The two transmission lines do not have sufficient capacity to supply the city’s water demand from White Plains,” adding: “On Friday, July 14, at about 3:30 a.m. the 36 inches pipelines that traverse through Johnsonville, Paynesville, Congo Town and Sinkor to Monrovia lost pressure. Most of what the pipe transverses is in the swamp, which has been a challenge, and the constant failure, because when you are pumping, and there is a power failure, there is usually a back pressure (surge pressure) and that sub pressure is three times of what you are pumping with.“If you are pumping with 90 PSI and abruptly the power goes off and then the back pressure is 270 PSI, that exceeds the design pressure of the pipe. It was designed for 150 PSI under normal condition, but…it can no longer stand the pressure.”During his media interactions, it was discovered that the section of the pipeline that failed, but was repaired in July 2016, had become faulty again, for the second time.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) LWSC MD, Hun Bu-Tulaylast_img read more

GLDA monitoring chicken shortage in Guyana

first_imgThe Guyana Livestock and Development Authority (GLDA) said that it has received reports of a shortage of chicken in the local market and is monitoring the situation.In a statement on its Facebook page, the Authority said based on their records, there has been a reduction in the number of cases of hatching eggs imported when compared to 2018, which perhaps could be attributed for the shortage.Additionally, some farmers have also been complaining of reduced growth rates and higher mortality, which may be attributed to the reduction of poultry meat on the market.“The major players in the sector were consulted and assured that the situation would be rectified during the week. This is based on the hatching and grow out time for the chickens. They have also assured that they are able to maintain supply to their major customers,” the statement noted.last_img read more

Road rage in Agua Dulce Neighbors suing to get right of way through Oasis Park

first_imgAGUA DULCE – In 1953, a woman who made a living raising chickens sued the owner of a property who gated off the road to her home. Today, a dispute for the same road easement that poultry farmer Laura Burke won in court more than 50 years ago is simmering between residents of a remote mountainous enclave along Briggs Road and the owner of a former mobile home park. And as the court battle heads toward a trial, proceedings are in the works at Metrolink to help the residents’ cause by allowing them an at-grade crossing into Oasis Park. A report to county Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich on whether the crossing would be safe is due back early this week. In the court battle, the attorney for Rancho Agua Dulce recently withdrew his motion to dismiss the residents’ lawsuit seeking road access. He did that after attorneys for the residents submitted documents to the court that include the 1954 judgment granting a road easement to Burke, a Briggs Road resident, and barring the then-owners of the property and their successors from “interfering with or obstructing in any way, the use of said easement.” The 1954 judgment could set a precedent for the current dispute between Briggs Road residents and Rancho Agua Dulce. “It’s subject to interpretation,” said Richard Marks, an attorney for the residents. “But I believe that it binds. … (It’s) something that a judge would certainly be interested in too, knowing that 53 years ago another judge found there was a prescriptive easement to Oasis Park.” A November trial has been scheduled in the case. Manny Fernandez, a co-owner of the park, said his attorney will re-file a motion to dismiss. “We are still confident that we’re going to win this case,” he said. “There’s no way that these people can prevail.” Residents of Briggs Road drove through Oasis Park for decades to get to Soledad Canyon Road. They have had to take a longer back route since August 2004, when the route through Oasis Park was closed off by new owner Rancho Agua Dulce. Burke, the poultry farmer from the 1950s, had been crossing through the property for decades until 1953, when the property owner put a metal post in the road and later a locked gate, according to her lawsuit. To gain a prescriptive easement to cross through Oasis Park, residents of Briggs Road need to prove that they crossed through before without permission. To meet the requirements of the law, Burke also had to prove that she crossed the property “adversely” to the interests of the property owner. But the legal terms have become more confrontational since then. While Burke’s lawsuit said that she crossed “openly and peaceably,” several Briggs Road residents now say in writing that they crossed the property in a “notorious” manner that was “hostile, adverse and under claim of right,” according to court documents. With the Metrolink report’s imminent release, the dispute shows no signs of getting less hostile in the coming weeks. alex.dobuzinskis@ dailynews.com (661) 257-5253 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more