Indonesia sues Thai energy giant PTT for $2B over 2009 oil spill

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by mongabayauthor Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Law, Law Enforcement, Oceans, Oil, Oil Spills center_img Banner image: The Montara platform seen from the air on Sept. 12, 2009, two weeks after the spill began. Oil slicks around platform are clearly visible; the white haze is a spray of water vapor, natural gas, and natural gas condensate from the uncontrolled well. Photo courtesy of Environs Kimberley/Flickr. The lawsuit follows a meeting in March between Luhut Pandjaitan, Indonesia’s coordinating maritime minister, and Julie Bishop, Australia’s foreign minister.It also comes on the heels of a class-action suit brought by 15,000 Indonesian seaweed farmers against the firm in Australian court.The company maintains it has seen no evidence of damage from the spill in Indonesian waters.NGOs are calling on all sides to form a joint task force to establish once and for whether such damage occurred. JAKARTA — Indonesia is suing an arm of Thailand’s biggest energy group, PTT, for the equivalent of more than $2 billion over a 2009 oil spill the archipelago country says damaged its environment and the health and livelihoods of local people.For the first time in the marine realm, the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry has invoked the principle of strict liability, previously used to hold plantation firms accountable for fires that occur on land they control.The Montara wellhead platform in the Timor Sea, near Indonesia and Australia’s maritime border. Map by Tim Henry for Mongabay.Last month, palm oil and paper industry lobby groups filed their own lawsuit with Indonesia’s highest court, asking it to abolish the concept of strict liability from the nation’s forestry and environment laws, although the business associations subsequently withdrew the suit, claiming they needed more time to study the rules.“This is a first for marine issues because we’re mostly dealing with forest fires,” said Jasmin Ragil Utomo, the ministry’s dispute settlement director. “But we are more than ready.”Indonesia’s lawsuit against the state-owned oil and gas giant comes eight years after a leak in the Montara offshore drilling platform it operated gushed tens of thousands of barrels of oil into the Timor Sea, a body of water shared by Australia and Indonesia. While the firm admits that oil from the spill reached Indonesian waters, and acknowledges that “mistakes were made that should never be repeated,” it continues to maintain it has seen no evidence that the spill caused harm to Indonesia’s environment. Negotiations between the two sides broke down four years ago.The lawsuit follows a meeting in March between coordinating maritime minister Luhut Pandjaitan and Australian foreign minister Julie Bishop at which the spill was discussed.“It has been a long time but that does not mean they are not accountable [for the damages],” said deputy coordinating maritime minister Arief Havas Oegroseno, who is working closely with the environment ministry on the case.An emaciated dolphin suffers from the knock-on effects of the spill in 2009. Photo courtesy of the World Wide Fund for Nature.Indonesian observers are calling for all sides in the dispute — the Indonesian and Australian governments, regional administrations, affected local people and the company — to form a joint task force to determine once and for all the extent of the damage in Indonesia.“If each party does its own research, the others will just reject it,” said Mukhtasor, an ocean engineering professor at Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, who like many Indonesians goes by one name. “If there’s a joint team, then the case can be settled.”The idea was proposed to Pandjaitan after his meeting with Bishop, although it has been floated for years, said Ferdi Tanoni, a member of the West Timor Care Foundation, an NGO advocating for people affected by the spill. More than 15,000 seaweed farmers have also filed a class-action lawsuit against the company in an Australian court, seeking compensation for loss of livelihoods due to faltering seaweed production and allegations of severe health problems.In the deputy coordinating minister’s view, Indonesia already has enough evidence. “We had a team and they did their part,” Oegroseno said. “So we’re focusing on the court process.”last_img read more

Three new frog species found in Peruvian Andes with more to come

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Biodiversity, Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Environment, Frogs, New Species, Species Discovery, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Few biological surveys have been conducted in the Pui Pui Protected Forest in the decades since it was established in 1985, and “the potential for additional discoveries is enormous,” according to one researcher who helped discover the three new frog species.The three new species all belong to a family of land-breeding frogs called Craugastoridae whose embryos hatch as froglets rather than going through a tadpole stage, which allows them to survive in a wide array of habitat types with sufficient moisture.The researchers say they will describe three more new frogs as well as two new lizards they’ve discovered in the Pui Pui Protected Forest in future papers. Three new frog species have been discovered in the montane forests and Andean grasslands of Peru’s Pui Pui Protected Forest.Rudolf von May, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Michigan and one of the authors of a paper describing the three new species that was published in the journal Zootaxa late last month, said in a statement that there are many more species discoveries to be made in the region — and teased the fact that he and his colleagues might soon be announcing further new finds of their own, including frogs and lizards.Few biological surveys have been conducted in the Pui Pui Protected Forest in the decades since it was established in 1985, and “the potential for additional discoveries is enormous,” von May added.“Our team has now described five new species of frogs from this region, with several more to come in the near future,” he said. “These discoveries demonstrate the need for further scientific exploration of such Andean habitats.”The three new species discovered by von May and the other co-authors of the Zootaxa paper — an international team of researchers from the Czech Republic and Peru in addition to the United States — all belong to the genus Pristimantis, a large genus of frogs containing close to 500 species found across Central and South America, from Honduras down to southern Brazil, as well as in the southern Caribbean.The Pui Pui Rubber Frog, Pristimantis puipui, is known from a single site near Laguna Sinchón, which marks the approximate center of the Pui Pui Protected Forest, at an elevation of 12,762 feet above sea level. The species name is derived from the Quechua words “pui pui,” meaning “eyes of water,” a reference to the many lakes of the Pui Pui Protected Forest. Photo Credit: Jiri Moravec.All three species are less than three inches in length and belong to a family of land-breeding frogs called Craugastoridae, whose embryos hatch as froglets rather than going through a tadpole stage, which allows them to survive in a wide array of habitat types with sufficient moisture. Edgar Lehr of Illinois Wesleyan University in the US, the lead author of the paper describing the new species, said that the high elevations of the Peruvian Andes appear to have been the scene of an evolutionary radiation for Craugastoridae frogs, which is when a single ancestral group produces many descendant species adapted to different habitats.About 70 percent of the Pui Pui Protected Forest, which covers 150,000 acres, is composed of Andean grasslands, while 30 percent is cloud forest.“Our findings suggest that the Pui Pui Protected Forest houses unique biological communities containing species found nowhere else,” Lehr said. “One reason for this is that the area has a steep topographic gradient including a broad array of habitats and local microclimates that contribute to high amphibian species diversity.”Two of the new species’ names reflect the habitat they seem to prefer. They are: the Pui Pui Rubber Frog (P. puipui), whose name was taken from the Quechua words “pui pui,” which means “eyes of water,” a reference to the lakes of the Pui Pui Protected Forest; and the Hill Dweller Rubber Frog (P. bounides), named after the Greek word “bounos,” which translates to “dweller of the hills.”The Hill Dweller Rubber Frog, Pristimantis bounides, is known from two sites at elevations of 10,991 feet and 11,362 feet. The species name “bounides” is derived from the Greek noun “bounos,” which means “dweller of the hills” and refers to the habitat of the mountain forests where this frog was found. It is an area of mixed vegetation including large layers of mosses, small bushes, trees, and Peruvian feather grass. Photo Credit: Rudolf von May.The third new species, Humboldt’s Rubber Frog (P. humboldti), was named in honor of German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt.The researchers note that, while habitat loss in the Peruvian Andes driven by conversion of forests into agricultural and pasture land is a concern, much of the habitat preferred by the newly discovered frog species is formally protected.Lehr, von May, and team described two other new species of Peruvian frogs earlier this year, P. ashaninka (named for the Ashaninka, an indigenous people from the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon) and P. attenboroughi (named in honor of Sir David Attenborough, the naturalist and BBC broadcaster). The researchers say they will describe three more new frogs as well as two new lizards they’ve discovered in the Pui Pui Protected Forest in future papers.The Humboldt’s Rubber Frog, Pristimantis humboldti, is known from a single site at 10,886 feet. The species name is the patronym of the German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who traveled and studied the New World between 1799 and 1804. Photo Credit: Rudolf von May.CITATIONLehr, E., Von May, R., Moravec, J., & Cusi, J. C. (2017). Three new species of Pristimantis (Amphibia, Anura, Craugastoridae) from upper montane forests and high Andean grasslands of the Pui Pui Protected Forest in central Peru. Zootaxa. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4299.3.1Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Samsung won’t partner with Korindo following outrage over forest destruction in Indonesia

first_imgUnder fire from watchdogs and consumers of its smartphones, Samsung said it would not pursue a joint venture with Korindo, itself the target of an NGO campaign for destroying rainforests in Indonesia.Korindo was previously outed in a Mighty Earth report for using fire to clear dense forests in Indonesia’s Tanah Papua region, home to birds-of-paradise and tree kangaroos.Papua is the last frontier for oil palm plantation firms like Korindo, and they move east in search of land on which to expand. Samsung will stay away from any joint venture with a Korean-Indonesian conglomerate, Korindo, amid an NGO campaign highlighting Korindo’s rainforest destruction for palm oil in Indonesia’s Tanah Papua region.Samsung’s announcement that it would partner with Korindo in the logistics sector had been widely reported in the Korean media. The joint venture was not directly related to Korindo’s palm oil operation, for which it has burned and cleared vast tracts of forestland in Papua and elsewhere to make way for its plantations, NGO Mighty Earth has exposed.Mighty has continued to pressure Korindo, most recently targeting its business partners in other sectors. Mighty and consumer group SumOfUs launched an online petition calling on Samsung to cut ties with Korindo, and it amassed more than 73,000 signatures, including 15,000 from users of Samsung phones.The petition was hand-delivered to Samsung’s main office in Seoul, ahead of the company’s launch of its new Galaxy Note 8 phone last month.That was part of a “week of action” surrounding the Galaxy Note 8’s launch in which over 2,000 Samsung customers sent emails to the electronics giant from their Samsung devices. Over 10,000 people took action online, and nearly 1 million people viewed online ads about Samsung’s connection to rainforest destruction, according to Mighty.“I own two of your TVs and recently switched my Galaxy back to Apple because of your Korindo involvement,” said one of the many personalized emails to Samsung. “As long as you continue to have an environmentally irresponsible ethos I will not be a customer, and I will share that with my friends and on social media.”After that, Samsung’s logistics arm sent a letter to Mighty, dated Aug. 31 and seen by Mongabay, saying it had no plan to establish a partnership with Korindo — and denying it had ever reached an agreement with Korindo in the first place.“Although it is true that there was a news article dated June 19th, 2017 reporting  ‘a strategic partnership with Korindo Group’ on the global logistics business, we, Samsung SDS, would like to inform you that there has not been any business dealings between Samsung SDS and Korindo Group, nor has there been a concrete plan or intention to pursue any further business opportunities between the two, except to the extent that certain meetings were previously held only to navigate potential business opportunities and nothing more,” read the letter.The joint venture had been reported by various Korean news outlets, complete with a photo of executives from both firms shaking hands in front of a banner displaying their corporate logos. Korindo posted the articles on its website.Despite Samsung’s decision to cut ties with Korindo, Samsung still has a direct stake in the oil palm sector. It owns two plantations on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra, part of a joint venture with the Ganda Group, which is controversial for its stake in a company that bulldozed people’s homes in 2011 to make way for its plantation.“Samsung has taken the first step to delink its business from rainforest destruction. Now it must go all the way,” Lapidus said. “Samsung needs to remedy its human rights abuses on its own palm oil plantations and require its joint venture partner, Ganda Group, to adopt a strict forest conservation policy aligned with the industry standard for responsible production.”As for Korindo, Lapidus said she hopes it “wakes up to the reality that even from a business perspective, it can’t continue to allow deforestation.” Article published by mongabayauthor FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Activism, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Environment, Palm Oil, Plantations Banner image: The stocky, flightless northern cassowary is one of the many birds-of-paradise for which Papua is famous. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.last_img read more

Indonesia abuzz over possible finding of extinct tiger

first_imgPark rangers in Java photographed a big cat that resembled the Javan tiger which was officially declared extinct in 2003.The finding prompted authorities and NGO in Indonesia to deploy an investigation team to gather more evidence.Meanwhile, some experts argued that the animal was most likely the Javan leopard. JAKARTA — Based on photographic evidence, park officials in Indonesia reported the possible sighting of the Javan tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) some 14 years after the animal was officially declared extinct.In the middle of doing a field survey on Aug. 25, a ranger from Ujung Kulon National Park in West Java photographed a big cat that officials failed to immediately identify. It subsequently sparked a speculation that the beast could be the Javan tiger which was last sighted in the island in 1976.An unidentified big cat was photographed last month by a ranger from Ujung Kulon National Park. Officials claim the animal could be the Extinct Javan tiger. Photo courtesy of Ujung Kulon National Park.“This used to be the habitat of Javan tiger,” Mamat Rahmat, chief of the park, told local news media last Wednesday. “We hope that they still exist.”The report, which went viral across the internet, has prompted Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry and NGO World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to deploy a team to investigate and set up more camera traps to gather more information and samples.“The stripes [on the cat] appear to be similar like that of Javan tiger, but its posture is questionable,” Wiratno, the director general of natural resources conservation, told local news media. “This is among the things that we want to confirm.”Meanwhile, the report has received skepticism from some experts who suggested that the creature resembled more the Critically Endangered Javan leopard (Panthera pardus melas).“The information is based on a photo that was taken from quite a far distance, and from far away, a leopard can appear to have stripes,” Gono Semiadi, a mammal expert with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) told local news media on Sept. 14.This photograph of a live Javan tiger was taken in 1938 at Ujung Kulon and published in A. Hoogerwerf’s “Ujung Kulon: The Land of the last Javan Rhinoceros.” Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.Rumoured sightings of the Javan tiger have been reported mostly by locals over the years, but research expeditions since 1990s have failed to prove the continued existence of the reclusive animal.Poaching and habitat loss in Java, the country’s most populated island with 140 million people, have led to mass extinction of animals, including the Javan tiger which is one of the three subspecies of Indonesian tigers.In 2003, the Javan tiger and the Bali tiger (Panthera tigris balica) were declared extinct by the IUCN. Meanwhile, the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is listed as Critically Endangered due to hunting and rapid deforestation in Sumatra island.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Habitat Loss, Mammals, Poaching, Tigers, Top Predators, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Saving the ‘Star Wars gibbon’: Q&A with primatologist Carolyn Thompson

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Gibbons, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Interviews, Interviews With Young Scientists, Mammals, New Species, Primates, Rainforest Animals, Species Discovery, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Carolyn Thompson, a Ph.D. student at University College London, is studying the newly described and little-known Skywalker hoolock gibbon.She is working with the very team that first described the small ape in the China-Myanmar border region.Thompson hopes that her research will contribute to the gibbon’s threat assessment on the International Union of Conservation for Nature Species Red List. In January this year, scientists described a new species of ape – a white-browed gibbon that lives in the remote forests of the Gaoligong Mountains on the border of China and Myanmar.The gibbon was originally classified as the eastern hoolock gibbon (Hoolock leuconedys). But the lead researcher, Fan Peng-Fei of Sun Yat-sen University in China, noticed that the gibbons of the Gaoligong Mountains seemed different: they had different markings on their bodies and their calls were unusual. So the team studied the gibbon in detail and confirmed that the primate was indeed a new species, previously unknown to science.The researchers, who are big Star Wars fans, named it the Skywalker hoolock gibbon (Hoolock tianxing) after Luke Skywalker.Adult male Skywalker hoolock gibbon, China. Photo by Fan Peng-Fei.The newly described Skywalker hoolock gibbon is a mystery. Scientists are unsure of its population size, or what threatens its survival in the wild. Carolyn Thompson, a primatologist and doctoral student at University College London, is trying to fill these gaps.Thompson has spent nearly a decade studying primates. She worked as the head primate scientist at the Borneo Nature Foundation in Kalimantan, Indonesia, where she studied primates like the Bornean white-bearded gibbon. “It was there that I fell in love with our singing, swinging cousins, the gibbons,” she told Mongabay.Now, Thompson is doing her doctoral studies with the very team that described the Skywalker hoolock gibbon. This is her dream Ph.D., Thompson says, but finding the funds to cover her research costs has been tough. Currently, she teaches part-time to support her research. She has also launched a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for some of her work.To celebrate International Gibbon Day on Oct. 24, Mongabay interviewed Carolyn Thompson about her work on the newly described Skywalker Hoolock gibbon.Interview with Carolyn ThompsonMongabay: How did you become interested in wildlife? What is your background?Carolyn Thompson: I was very fortunate and had an amazing childhood growing up in Scotland, Indonesia and Norway. I was always surrounded by mountains, rainforests and had plenty of opportunities to spot wildlife. At the age of 7 I already knew I wanted to work with animals. My first non-human primate encounter was in Indonesia. I was 3 when my mum took my sister and I to a monkey park with long-tailed macaque residents. I saw one grimace and shouted excitedly, “Mum, that monkey is smiling at me!” (I now know that it was not smiling. It was most likely a threat display!) At school I focused on geography, biology and psychology … and later studied towards bachelor degrees in geography and life sciences. This eventually led to a master’s of research in primatology.Why did you decide to focus on primates?Primates have always fascinated me: their unique behaviors, their adaptable nature and their interesting evolutionary lineage. I always wanted to focus my career on a species that really needed conservation attention, however. When I was in my teens I read an article all about the palm oil industry and the devastation it was causing. It quickly became my dream to get out to Borneo to see the situation for myself and help the orangutans in any way I could. I started out working hands-on with primates in sanctuaries, but I soon realized the importance of conservation research, after which I became very passionate about studying wild primates in situ.You’ve had 10 years of experience working in the field of primatology. What has been your favorite project?During and after my university studies I tried to get as much field experience as possible. After all, primatology can be a competitive field. As a result, I have worked in some wonderful, awe-inspiring places with some amazing organizations – some bad ones too! I have many fieldwork stories involving black mamba and pit-viper bites, primates defecating on my head, and skinks living in my bed! One of my favorite organizations was the Borneo Nature Foundation based in Kalimantan, Indonesia. I worked as the head primate scientist in a peat swamp forest managing three research projects, one of which was on the Bornean white-bearded gibbon. It was there that I fell in love with our singing, swinging cousins, the gibbons.Carolyn Thompson in the forest (left) and in a peat swamp forest (right), Indonesia. Photos by Helene Birot (L) and Carolyn Thompson (R).Why did you decide to study the Skywalker hoolock gibbon?The majority of the 20 known gibbon species are endangered. The Hainan gibbon, for example, is the world’s rarest mammal, with less than 30 individuals remaining. Not many people know about gibbons, the smallest of the apes. In comparison to their great ape cousins, they are often overshadowed, so it’s great to have an International Gibbon Day to raise some needed awareness! When reading articles about endangered gibbons, I knew this was the area I wanted to focus my career on. Earlier this year, a new species of gibbon, the Skywalker hoolock, was discovered on the border between China and Myanmar (Burma). Population surveys have revealed that there are only 200 individuals in China but numbers in Myanmar are currently unknown. We still have lots to learn about this new species, which presents a very exciting research opportunity, but we are also under time constraints as the Skywalker gibbon is threatened by hunting and habitat loss.What do you hope to study and find out during your Ph.D. studies?My main aim [in] my research is to investigate the patterns and drivers of gibbon decline in eastern and southeastern Asia. I am very interested in transboundary populations (that is, those species that are found straddling the border of two or more countries). Studying such species presents vital opportunities for international communication, cooperation and collaboration. I plan to focus on the Skywalker gibbon, carrying out important population density surveys in Myanmar and analyzing DNA samples to investigate patterns of dispersal and potential inbreeding. This information will contribute to the species’ threat assessment on the International Union of Conservation for Nature Species Red List. I also plan to work very closely with local communities to understand values, needs and patterns of resource use.Do you spend much time in the field? If so, what does a typical day in the field involve?I love fieldwork. It is one of the best parts of my job! For my Ph.D. research, I will have to spend more than one year in the field. Depending on the species, a typical day usually involves waking up whilst it’s still dark and trekking into the forest. I then sit and wait for the gibbons to start their singing. Gibbons have these haunting, species-specific, territorial songs – the most magical thing you will ever hear! I then use the songs to target certain groups or to collect population data. If following a targeted group, I quietly approach the family and wait for the sun to come up so I can try and spot my focal gibbon, the one that I will be collecting data on. I am a behavioral ecologist, so the majority of my experience has involved recording activity budget data for activities like travel, feed, rest and social interactions. I will follow a family group until they find a sleeping tree to rest in for the night. The days can be long but so incredibly rewarding, and there are always unexpected delights in the forest. I’ve found unusual invertebrates, accidentally tripped over a wild sun bear, and once saw 13 unexpected wild orangutans in one day!Carolyn Thompson climbing into an orangutan nest in Indonesia. Photos by Bernat Ripoll Capilla.You mentioned that you struggled to find funding for the Ph.D. of your choice. Can you tell us about that?In 2015, I started planning this Ph.D. project with my supervisors. Although I have 10 years’ worth of experience in this field working with reputable organizations and a handful of strong qualifications including an MRes in primatology with distinction, securing funds in [primate] conservation is extremely difficult. I’ve watched many of my colleagues slowly give up on working in primatology due to the lack of opportunities and funding in this field. I refuse to give up, however. I knew I would not be happy doing anything else and had to stay true to myself. I accepted all the rejections and prayed for that one “yes” that I needed. I applied to a handful of organizations for competitive grants but was sadly unsuccessful.From my experience, it is much easier to apply on behalf of an organization, rather than as an individual like myself, who is just embarking on their Ph.D. journey. I even tried applying to a doctoral training school. I was halfway through my interview excitedly telling the panel all about my intended research and potential methods and outputs, when they asked me what else I was interested in. This question threw me. I had not fully understood the nature of the doctoral training program until that moment. I was told I was unsuccessful because I was “too focused for that Ph.D. program”. I was so unbelievably disappointed. I was also confused – surely one should be focused when conducting Ph.D. research?My supervisors have been amazingly supportive. They have taken me on as a self-funded student. I teach part-time, without which I wouldn’t be able to do my dream Ph.D. and this important research. It is tough trying to focus on my Ph.D. when my days are taken up with teaching commitments. A friend therefore suggested I look into crowdfunding. I will admit I am not tech savvy so the prospect daunted me. I have thrown myself into it, however, and have set up a campaign to ask for financial support to help cover some of my research costs. It has been a learning curve and I am so thankful to all those generous friends and family who have helped me get this campaign off the ground. In particular, Dave McCall, [who] is a professional animator and has devoted hours of his time, working free of charge to create a wonderful masterpiece showcasing my research. You can support my campaign at www.gofundme.com/skywalkergibbonresearch.Adult female Skywalker hoolock gibbon, China. Photo by Fan Peng-Fei.What’s it like working with the very scientists who discovered the Skywalker gibbons?It is so incredible! Minus the fact that I have limited financial support, I am doing my dream Ph.D. with a gibbon dream team! My supervisors work at University College London, Zoological Society of London, and Sun Yat-sen University in China. They are all so knowledgeable and each scientist brings something different to the project. They are all incredibly approachable and forthcoming with their ideas and suggestions. I owe them so much thanks for realizing my passion for this topic and taking me on, no questions asked.What excites you the most about Skywalker gibbons? Have you seen one in the wild?I am yet to see one in the wild. I am hoping with the crowdfunding support, I can get out into the field early next year. I am so unbelievably excited and keep pinching myself. It is every zoologist’s dream to work with a newly discovered species, especially one with such an amazing name. I am a massive Star Wars fan so I’ve decided it’s fate.Any advice for people wanting to study primates?Never. Give. Up. You may get plenty of rejections, but if you are passionate, enthusiastic and determined, your hard work will pay off and be noticed by someone. You also don’t need to follow the usual route. I did an Open University degree very early on in my career so that I could work part-time and earn money to pay for fieldwork opportunities. It was one of the best decisions I ever made. Volunteering experience is so useful on your CV – but do your homework. There are a lot of organizations that ask for a great deal of money and offer little in return. Finally, you should read widely around primatology to get a feel for the different research being done. Don’t be afraid to email academics to introduce yourself and present your ideas. It is so important to network and build up contacts.last_img read more

Top Madagascar beer maker supports investigation into its corn supply chain

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Biodiversity, Conservation, Corn, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forestry, Forests, Logging, Protected Areas Article published by malavikavyawaharecenter_img Madagascar brewer STAR, owned by the French Castel group, is under pressure for allegedly sourcing maize from a rapidly deforesting area in the country’s west.It has agreed to support an independent study led by Malagasy NGO Association Fanamby to investigate whether the maize in its supply chain is linked to deforestation in the Menabe Antimena protected area.The protected area hosts endangered and endemic species like the Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae) and the Malagasy giant rat (Hypogeomys antimena).More than one-fifth of the dry deciduous forest in Menabe Antimena was lost between 2006 and 2016, and there are no signs of the deforestation abating. Facing growing scrutiny for sourcing maize from a region in Madagascar that is suffering massive deforestation, the Madagascar beer maker STAR, owned by French brewer Castel, announced its support for an independent investigation into its supply chain.“We have requested an independent audit, in this area, whose conclusions will be made public as soon as possible,” Francis Ambroise, the STAR group’s deputy president director general, said at a news conference held in the capital Antananarivo on Sept. 17.The study will be carried out by the Malagasy NGO Association Fanamby, which manages the Menabe Antimena protected area, located on Madagascar’s west coast. The dry deciduous forests of Menabe Antimena host a number of endangered species, including the endemic Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae), which is the smallest primate on the planet, the Malagasy giant rat (Hypogeomys antimena), and Grandidier’s baobab trees (Adansonia grandidieri).The Malagasy giant rat [Hypogeomys antimena], a species endemic to the dry deciduous forests of western Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. ButlerThe forests are being cleared to grow maize and peanuts. More than one-fifth of the dry deciduous forests in Menabe Antimena were lost between 2006 and 2016, and there are no signs of the deforestation abating. In a story published earlier this year, Mongabay highlighted the role of corn farming in the deforestation. STAR is one of the companies sourcing maize from the wider Menabe region, but it has in the past denied allegations that its supply chain has contributed to deforestation in the protected area. STAR said in a statement last week that its demand for maize only accounts for about 13,000 tons, or 2.65 percent of Madagascar’s annual maize production of 490,000 tons, and that only a fraction of it comes from the Menabe region. However, Ambroise also noted at the news conference that the group could not verify the provenance of all the corn it uses.STAR makes the popular Three Horses Beer and is the leading brewer in Madagascar; it has dominated the domestic market for decades. The company was acquired by the French Castel group in 2011 and is Coca-Cola Madagascar’s bottling partner. While barley is the traditional grain from which sugars are extracted and then fermented to produce beer, brewers often substitute starch-rich corn. The STAR group has four subsidiaries that collect and process raw ingredients in Madagascar: STAR Madagascar, Malto, Sema Eau Vive, and New Brewery of Madagascar. According to an industry publication, Malto alone relies on 20,000 peasants to supply its raw materials, including corn.Corn farmers in this region practice slash-and-burn agriculture, clearing forestland by burning it. The practice creates a layer of nutrient rich top-soil but is also highly unsustainable. Corn requires rich soils and after a few planting seasons depletes the nutrients in the soil, so farmers must seek more land to grow it. They continue to plant peanuts in the depleted soil until it is no longer feasible, and then abandon the land, leaving grassland or bare earth in their wake where forest once stood. On a visit to the region in July, months before the start of the typical burn season, Mongabay founder Rhett Butler documented dozens of fires burning.The Menabe Antimena protected area, spread across 2,100 square kilometers (811 square miles) has come under severe pressure as a messy network of middlemen and traders, supported by the local elite, exploit local and migrant labor to clear forest for cropland.The NGO, Fanamby has been trying to find a link between the local traders who collect maize from farmers and the people who finally sell it to companies, exporters or consumers., according to Tiana Andriamanana, executive director of Fanamby. “Since December 2018 as we’ve heard rumors about the implication of various companies,” she said.The declaration of Menabe Antimena as a protected area in 2015 does not appear to have stemmed the deforestation. The Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, an international NGO that works in Madagascar, has predicted that nearly 45 percent of the forest will be lost by 2020 and just over 83 percent by 2025.Map shows forest loss inside the Menabe Antimena Protected Area in 2009 (click here to enlarge). Image courtesy of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.Maps show forest loss inside the Menabe Antimena Protected Area in 2017 (click here to enlarge). Image courtesy of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.Map shows a forecast of how much forest could be lost by 2020 (click here to enlarge). Images courtesy of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.“In the absence of immediate actions, the dry forest of the west, the hard core of the protected area, will disappear,” Anselme Toto Volahy, project manager for Durrell’s Menabe program, said in an email, adding that it creates a real threat of extinction for several species like the Malagasy giant rat, the flat-tailed turtle (Pyxis planicauda), and the Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur.Fanamby will lead a research team that will look into supply chains for not just maize but also for peanuts. “The idea is to get facts about the capacity of production in the area, facts about the value chains, from field to final product, and recommendations about how we can move forward based on these facts,” Andriamanana said.Fanamby is funding the recently announced investigation itself, at least initially. The STAR group is offering support and information about its procurement chain, but is not financing the investigation. It is not the first time Fanamby and the STAR group are working together.“We work with Fanamby to control our suppliers, respect the contracts’ clauses and to ensure the traceability of our maize supply,” Ambroise told Reuters in an interview published earlier this month, “using maize from protected areas would be against what we consider to be our society responsibility.”To meet its obligations under ISO 9001, a widely used set of international standards to manage quality, STAR has to ensure that it is not sourcing materials from protected areas. However, the investigation, which is expected to be completed by November, will cast a wider net.“Chasing one or two potential suspects won’t resolve any of these issues. We need a long-term solution and we need all the stakeholders on our side,” Andriamanana said. “Knowing the CSR [corporate social responsibility] activities of the STAR [group], we’re hoping they can be one of these stakeholders.”STAR did not respond to queries sent by Mongabay by the time this article was published.Banner Image: Fires burning in the Kirindy forest of Menabe Antimena. Image by Rhett A. ButlerMalavika Vyawahare is the Madagascar staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Chief Raoni, Nobel Peace Prize nominee, presides over historic meeting with over 600 indigenous leaders in Brazil

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In January, indigenous leaders from 47 tribes participated in a historic event in a Kayapó village in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Chief Raoni Metuktire called the meeting to articulate a response to the Bolsonaro administration’s incendiary rhetoric and aggressive actions against the country’s indigenous population.Debates and discussions lasted four days and resulted in the Piaraçu Manifesto, a four-page document that denounces the Brazilian government for its role in the threatening of indigenous populations. The manifesto not only demands respect from President Bolsonaro and the government, but also makes a clear statement that environmentally disastrous projects are not welcome in their territories.Raoni, one of Brazil’s main indigenous leaders, presided over the event as a Nobel Peace Prize nominee. His nomination, announced in October of 2019, has the support of a strong social media campaign. The harsh midday sun shines down in the Kayapó village of Piaraçu in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Dozens of indigenous men and women sit under the cover of the House of Men, a large structure made of wood and hay that is located in the middle of the village. They are here for the Meeting of the Mebengokre Peoples and Brazilian Indigenous Leaders, a historic gathering of Brazil’s indigenous peoples to discuss the critical situation they currently face in their country. As speakers and audience members discuss and debate urgent issues, Raoni Metuktire listens attentively to the pleas and woes of those present.The 89-year-old Kayapó leader, often referred to simply as Chief Raoni, called the meeting to help articulate a response to the Brazilian government’s incendiary rhetoric and aggressive actions against the country’s native peoples. It comes as the result of one of the most devastating years for the Amazon in recent memory. Along with the highest deforestation rates in 11 years, the violent murders of at least seven indigenous leaders contributed to the increasing hostility against the country’s indigenous peoples. President Jair Bolsonaro’s intentions of opening up indigenous lands for agribusiness and mineral extraction further intensify the already dire situation that they face.From Jan. 14-17, more than 600 indigenous leaders from 47 different tribes met at the village, making it one of the biggest meetings to ever occur on Brazilian indigenous territory. Presided over by Chief Raoni himself, the meeting likened itself to official state negotiations, allowing time for traditional leaders, women and youths to voice their opinions. Throughout the meeting, Raoni made it clear that the indigenous peoples do not want to attack anyone, but rather to defend themselves. Speaking through translator Megaron Txucarramãe, the Kayapó leader said: “We’re not meeting here to plan for a war or conflict. We are here to defend our people, our cause, and our land … I would never call a meeting to attack someone. We are here to defend ourselves.”Olympio Serra, a Brazilian indigenist, anthropologist and former director of Xingu Indigenous Park, stressed the historic nature of the event. “It was the opportunity that these different peoples had to answer Raoni’s call and sit down to better understand and organize an urgent plan of action against [the government’s] colonialist mentality,” he said.Chief Raoni presiding over debates in Piaraçu. Image by Rafael Forsetto.The landmark debates lasted for four days and, after extensive review, resulted in the Piaraçu Manifesto, a four-page document denouncing the Brazilian government for its role in putting indigenous peoples at risk. The manifesto not only demands respect from President Bolsonaro and the government, but also clearly states that environmentally disastrous projects have no place on indigenous lands or anywhere else. “We do not accept gold digging, mining, agribusiness and leasing of our lands, we do not accept loggers, illegal fishermen, hydroelectric plants and other projects, such as the Ferrogrão, that will impact us in a direct and irreversible way,” the document says.Brazil’s indigenous population is no stranger to megaprojects that sacrifice the environment in the name of development and profit. The BR-080 highway cuts through the indigenous territory where the meeting occurred and separates Piaraçu from its neighboring village, Pakaya. Huge trucks carrying grain cross the territory throughout the day, a visual representation of how agribusiness directly affects their way of life. During a speech at the event, Taphi Yawalapiti reiterated the importance of preserving the Amazon: “If the forest disappears, our cultures will also disappear … our languages will disappear. We need to fight for the preservation of our land; we need to unite our forces.”Many representatives called for unity among the indigenous peoples during this difficult moment. Respect, however, was the main recurring demand during the event. “We want, above all else, respect for our lives, our traditions, our customs and the Federal Constitution which protects our rights,” the manifesto reads. Raoni and other leaders will present the final document to the National Congress in Brasília at a date not yet announced. The Raoni Institute has confirmed that the manifesto will also be available in English, Spanish and French.Nobel Peace PrizeRaoni himself is no stranger to the spotlight. The chief is internationally famous for his efforts to protect the Amazon and guarantee indigenous rights. Perhaps his most notable struggle is the campaign he spearheaded against the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam (formerly known as Kararaô), in the northern state of Pará. The protests spanned from the 1970s to the 2010s, but the dam was ultimately built in 2011, under the presidency of Dilma Rousseff. Nonetheless, it solidified Chief Raoni’s standing as a global figure and leading environmental activist.Thanks to his conservation efforts, Chief Raoni’s face and emblematic lip-plate were a common sight on newspapers and television throughout the 1980s and 1990s. His boost in popularity during this time was due to highly publicized events such as the Meeting of the Indigenous Peoples of the Xingu, which received worldwide coverage thanks to the participation of British musician Sting. Since then, Raoni has lived a more reserved lifestyle away from the cameras. Recent events, however, prompted him to return to the global stage and continue his fight for indigenous rights and for the Amazon.Indigenous participants arriving by boat on the Xingu River. Image by Rafael Forsetto.In 2019, he met with French President Emmanuel Macron, followed by a meeting with Pope Francis at the Vatican. This return to form did not sit well with Bolsonaro, who mentioned Raoni by name during his speech at the opening of the 74th United Nations General Assembly. In his statements, the Brazilian president said: “The vision of one indigenous leader does not represent that of all Brazilian indigenous peoples … Mr. Raoni’s monopoly is over.” Bolsonaro also used the opportunity to exalt an outspoken supporter of the government named Ysany Kalapalo as an alternative spokesperson for the indigenous cause.The speech sparked impassioned responses all over the world, and shortly thereafter Chief Raoni’s name popped up as a contender for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. The symbolic value of Brazil’s first laureate being an indigenous person is not lost upon his supporters. The Darcy Ribeiro Foundation is leading a campaign to rally support for the Nobel Prize.As part of the campaign, Raoni has a full schedule ahead of him for 2020. Later this month, he will be speaking at Oxford University on environmental protection and human rights. He will also be meeting abroad with key figures to help rally support for the environmental and indigenous cause in Brazil. “The best way to do battle is through dialogue. I have been fighting ever since they started to build this road [BR-080],” Raoni says. “I don’t fight with my hands; I fight with my thoughts.”Kawali Koli, a young Enawenê-Nawê community member, speaking in a debate. Image by Rafael Forsetto.Banner image of Tapirapé warriors before a performance during the Meeting of the Mebengokre Peoples and Brazilian Indigenous Leaders. Image by Rafael Forsetto. This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Brazil team and published here on our Brazil site on Feb. 3, 2019. Article published by Xavier Bartaburucenter_img Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Destruction, Biodiversity, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Mrn-amazon Infrastructure, Rainforest Deforestation last_img read more

Music festival in Kenyan national park ruffles feathers

first_imgArticle published by terna gyuse Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation organization WildlifeDirect argues a music festival planned for Hells’ Gate National Park will further disturb vulnerable raptors and other wildlife.The Kenya Wildlife Service defends this and similar events, saying the park is an “activity-based conservation and recreation facility” and some of the revenue raised will go towards supporting conservation.Hell’s Gate, a breeding site for the endangered Rüppell’s vulture, has also been heavily impacted by geothermal power generation. Kenyan conservationists are challenging plans to host a music festival at Hell’s Gate National Park, 100 km outside the capital, Nairobi, on Feb. 14. They say it will negatively impact wildlife in the park, including endangered vulture species.Organizers expect the festival will attract an estimated 20,000 people. The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), the government agency charged with conservation and management of wildlife, also plans to host the East African leg of the World Rally Championship in Hell’s Gate in July.Conservation organization Wildlife Direct has applied for a court injunction against KWS and the festival organizers, arguing that no proper assessment of the environmental impact of the music festival has been done. The organization wants the festival moved elsewhere, and disturbance of wildlife in the park to be minimised, allowing already-declining raptor breeding colonies in the park’s cliff habitat to recover.“This decision to go to court over Koroga Festival was a last resort,” said WildlifeDirect CEO Paula Kahumbu in a statement, “after efforts to persuade the private and state partners to move the festival, a 2-day music concert to an audience of 15,000 or more customers. The Hell’s Gate is the only protected colony of breeding Rüppell’s vultures, which is critically endangered.”The NGO also launched an online campaign calling for the relocation of the festival to a site elsewhere, attracting support from the Conservation Alliance of Kenya, local and international NGOs and the tourism Industry.This is the first time the Koroga Festival, an annual event celebrating African music, food, and fashion organized by Nairobi-based media company Capital FM, is taking place outside of Nairobi. Besides performances by popular musicians on a main stage, the festival will also include activities such as a cycling race, a clean-up effort at nearby Lake Naivasha, and a hike on Mount Longonot, an adjacent protected area.According to a project summary produced by Nakuru County’s ministry responsible for trade, tourism and cooperatives, the site of the festival will be in front of the Main Wall, some 7 kilometers from the Rüppell’s vulture (Gyps rueppelli) nesting site. The summary says disturbance will be minimised by a temporary fence around the festival site and KWS patrols; speakers set up to face the park’s admin buildings rather than into the park; and restricting vehicle access to emergency services only.KWS did not respond to Mongabay’s request for an interview before publication, but the service released a statement defending the event, describing Hell’s Gate as an “activity based conservation and recreation facility”. The park has hosted similar events in the past, including a jazz festival in 2018, and an annual wheelbarrow race to raise funds. KWS also argues that some of the revenue raised by events like this is used for conservation and community development. A Jan. 16 letter from KWS to the festival organizers sets out total fees of 700,000 Ksh (7,000 dollars) to cover security and conservation fees for this event.“But these are not the primary purposes of a national park,” Kahumbu told Mongabay in an interview, “they are supposed to be used for conservation of wildlife. We understand that the government has to generate revenue but we are not convinced because such activities degrade the environment.”Hell’s Gate is the only protected breeding site in Kenya for Rüppell’s vulture, whose population is in decline across the continent. Image Brad via Flickr (CC BY-ND-2.0)Hell’s GateOne of Kenya’s smallest protected areas, Hell’s Gate National Park features the Main Wall, one of the highest cliff faces in Kenya’s Rift Valley. The cliffs provide breeding habitat for raptors such as eagles, falcons, and vultures, one of the factors prompting the gazetting of the park as a refuge in 1984.Its spectacular cliffs and canyons as well as geysers and hot springs have long been a popular destination for hikers and climbers – by some accounts, climbers on the Main Wall have frequently disturbed nesting sites there.The park’s ecology has also been impacted by the development of geothermal power in this area. A draft report by a task force investigating the impacts of state-owned KenGen’s power stations says the likely reason for a sharp decline in numbers of breeding pairs of Rüppell’s vulture and the complete disappearance of breeding bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus) and Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus) is noise and other disturbance linked to power generation.The report further states that an agreement detailing ways to mitigate the impacts of geothermal stations on the park had been neglected by both KenGen and KWS.Biologist Munir Virani, executive vice president of the Peregrine Fund, says that vultures are critical to the integrity of ecosystems. By rapidly eating carcasses, they help limit the transmission of disease amongst other scavenging carnivores like jackals and hyenas.An investigation led by the Peregrine Fund’s Darcy Ogada into the effects of declining numbers of vultures on ecosystems in Kenya found that in the absence of the winged scavengers, it took nearly three times as long for a carcass to decompose, with three times as many scavenging mammals spending far longer at carcasses, creating conditions for the spread of diseases such as rabies.Across Africa, vulture populations have fallen by an average of 62 percent over the last three decades — with seven species crashing by 80 percent — due primarily to accidental poisoning aimed at livestock predators.Virani told Mongabay that the East Africa region has lost 70 percent of its vultures in just the last decade. “It is high time that governments and other conservation actors realise that if we do not act now to restore the vultures, we are sitting on a time bomb,” he said.For Kahumbu, this underscores the importance of protecting vultures and other animals within national parks. The biggest challenge, she says, is a breakdown of effective regulation, permitting damaging events to take place without meaningful oversight by the responsible bodies.“We have gone to court hoping that they will stop the event so that we can go back to the drawing board and talk to each other on the need to conserve the park,” said Kahumbu. “We filed an application in court for an injunction as well as a petition against the KWS and Naivasha Love Festival over the Koroga Festival which is planned on 14/15th February at Hell’s Gate National Park. We need to rehabilitate the park to restore the ecosystem and the birds will be back. We have done a lot of harm to this park, we need to save it now.”CitationsOgada, D., Torchin, M.E., Kinnaird, M.F., and Ezenwa, V.O. (2012), Effects of vulture declines on facultative scavengers and potential implications for mammalian disease transmission. Conservation Biology, 26: 453-460. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2012.01827.xOgada, D., Shaw, P., Beyers, R. L., Buij, R., Murn, C., Thiollay, J. M., … Sinclair, A. R. E. (2015). Another continental vulture crisis: Africa’s vultures collapsing toward extinction. Conservation Letters, 9(2), 89-97. doi:10.1111/conl.12182Banner image: Hell’s Gate National Park. Image by Nao Izuka via Wikicommons (CC BY-2.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Upcountry Basketball Tourney March 13

first_imgThe Ministry of Youth and Sports (MYS) in collaboration with the Liberia Basketball Association (LBA) has finally fixed the date for the 2014/2015 Upcountry Basketball Tournament for Tuesday, March 13 to Friday, March 16, 2015.The four-day basketball festival would be held at the auditorium of the William V.S. Tubman-Gray United Methodist High School in Gbarnga, Bong County.Assistant Sports Minister Murvee Gray told the Daily Observer yesterday that the tourney would bring six schools from four counties.They are Gboveh High School, the William V.S. Tuman-Gray United Methodist High School and the St. Martin Lutheran High School in Bong County. The rest are the Brooker Washington Institute (BWI) in Margibi County; St. Mary’s Catholic School in Nimba County and the Voinjama Multilateral High School in Lofa County.Minister Gray said the tourney is usually held in November since its re-launch in 2012, but it was decided for March to be considered as a joint festival having been unsuccessful last year November, owing to the outbreak of the deadly Ebola Virus Disease (EVD).“The reduction of participating schools in this year’s tourney is because of lack of funds,” Ministry Gray said.Ebola preventive measures would be part of a one-day clinical basketball seminar to be held the weekend to the commencement of the festival, Asst. Minister Gray averred.It may be recalled that in 2013 Margibi-based   Booker Washington Institute (BWI) whipped Ganta United Methodist High School 50-47 to win the reactivated Championship at the William V.S Tubman Gray United Methodist High School Gymnasium in Gbarnga City.Ganta United Methodist of Nimba County lost the gigantic trophy last year when they suffered similar defeat at the hands of St. Martin High School in 2012. The competition was initiated in the 1970s to help promote the game among high schools in the central region, which at the time comprised of Bong, Lofa and Nimba Counties.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

“Bequeath to future generation much more than we inherited” – President

first_img52nd Independence AnniversaryGuyana’s 52nd Independence Anniversary is being observed with a focus on youths, and President David Granger has stated that much more should be given to the Guyanese children, who are the future of the country. In his Independence Day address to the nation, the Head of State posited that the country’s fore-parents fought for freedom from colonial rule, but did not get to enjoy the labour of their efforts. To this end, he noted that future generations must get opportunities to enjoy the fruits of their labours.“Independence has laid the foundation for a more inclusive and democratic society, which will guarantee the good life for the next generation. Independence is the best time to remember that children are our future. We need to bequeath to them much more than we inherited from our own parents,” he stated.According to President Granger, Guyana’s 52nd Independence anniversary is an occasion for celebration, as it commemorates a departure from past degradation while articulating the nation’s aspiration for present and future generations.“Independence was not the result of a single event; it was the culmination of three hundred and fifty years of resistance, revolt and struggle against conquest, degradation, enslavement, indentureship and exploitation – the most dehumanising characteristics of European colonial rule,” the Head of State noted.He went to remind that the ancestors of the Guyanese people – Africans, Amerindians, Chinese, Europeans (including Portuguese), Indians and persons of mixed descent – fought against colonial rule, sacrifices of which their descendants today are the beneficiaries. This, he added, is captured in the National Anthem’s verse: “We are born of their sacrifice, heirs of their pains…”The Guyanese leader continued that the struggles of ancestors, which were inspired by workers’ agitation, embraced all social classes, and gained political momentum with the introduction of constitutional change and the achievement of universal adult suffrage.“Independence, once achieved, enabled the elimination of the worst forms of discrimination, the extension of universal primary and secondary education, and the emergence of local economic enterprises, among other changes. Independence ushered in an era of national pride which has buoyed Guyanese society. National symbols such as the national anthem, awards, coinage, flag, institutions, patriotic songs and stamps, helped to define our distinctive identity. Guyana took its place as a sovereign state in the international community,” the President stated.In reflecting on the events that followed the freedom from colonial rule, President Granger noted that the country’s socio-economic fortunes begun taking a turn that would see development across all spheres.He mentioned that public education at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels became more accessible with the introduction of new multilateral schools, technical institutes, teachers’ college of education and a university.With regard to public infrastructure, the Head of State highlighted that the construction of new aerodromes, bridges and highways, and the extension of public utilities and services such as the supply of electricity, housing and water have all enhanced the quality of life for citizens.He went on to outline that public health services through neighbourhood clinics, local health centres, and regional hospitals improved child care, reduced the incidence of child mortality, non-communicable and vector-borne diseases among the growing population of children.“Guyana is a bountiful country. We are reminded daily about our potential. We are on the way to establishing a ‘green state’ in which the environment will be better protected, sustainable development of our natural resources will be pursued, cheaper and more abundant energy from renewable sources will be provided, and the well-being of present and future generations will be assured. Guyanese are a beautiful people. We, the children of the continents of Earth – Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe – are on the way to creating a more cohesive society,” he posited.After 500 years of being a colony to different countries, the last of which was the British, Guyana gained independence from the United Kingdom on May 26, 1966.last_img read more