Change and Standing on Platforms of Possibilities

first_imgBy Trisha Wohlfeil, MA, LMFTOne of the reasons change is so hard for many of us is because where there is change there is often vulnerability. Many of us find the experience of vulnerability incredibly uncomfortable or even downright painful. Based on her research Brené Brown defines vulnerability as “uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure”. Not only is it nearly impossible to avoid uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure on a daily basis, but when we are facing change it often heightens them. It requires us to call deep on our courage to face what lies ahead. I used to think that people who were brave didn’t feel vulnerable any more, but now I now know that not only is it possible to be brave and afraid at the same time, they almost always happen together.One thing that had helped me while learning The Daring Way™ is to find metaphors that help put words to my experiences. This is especially helpful for me when facing a sensitive topic like vulnerability. This is the experience I think of when I am facing vulnerability and taking a risk. Our family attends a family camp together in the summer and one of the adventure activities we always sign up for is the zip line. To get to the zip line platform, you first have to climb a large hill of steps to get to the tower and once you are there you have climb even more flights of stairs to get to the top of the platform to ride the zip line. A thrilling ride where you zoom down the hill dangling from a cable attached to harness.While your heart is pounding from all the steps, it begins to pound even more when you see the height you are at and the ledge you are going to step off. When it is your turn at the top, a crewmember attaches a safety rope while attaching your harness onto the cable you will ride down on. I can always count on feeling the danger and risk while my heart pounds away in anticipation for what comes next. A thrilling ride awaits me if and when I can get myself to step off the ledge.Every year, as I am climbing those stairs, I start thinking “maybe I am too old for this? Do I really need to do this? Why am I climbing all these stairs to then throw myself off a high ledge when I could be on the beach or floating in the lake?” The walk up to the platform is not my favorite part. Standing on the platform waiting to step off is especially uncomfortable and really not my favorite part. My brain is screaming thoughts like “what are you doing?”, “step away from the ledge” “are you really sure that little cable will hold you” and finally “this is crazy, don’t do it!”I used to think that a really brave person wouldn’t feel or think any of those thoughts, but just confidently step right up and off. But the more I learn about vulnerability and courage the more that I realize that just because I feel vulnerable does not mean I am not brave. In fact, Brené calls the willingness to be vulnerable “our most accurate measure of courage”. Also, I don’t know about you, but the last thing I need is to beat myself up about not having the “right” feelings when I am trying to do something challenging.So this last year I faced the zip line a little differently. I saw the stairs as a necessary part of the journey even if it wasn’t my favorite. I still felt nervous on the platform, but I told myself it is supposed to feel this way as it is risky and a bit dangerous. Also, its okay if I don’t like it. But it’s all part of the experience I have to go through to get to the next part. It’s the reason why I do all of those steps and stand on a scary ledge. I have to do those things to be able to have the thrilling ride of zipping down the hill surrounded with beautiful scenic views and the amazing adrenaline that accompanies the journey. You see there is a reason why I trek up that hill each year (sometimes I even go more than once in a day). For me, when I take the journey, face my fear and step off that ledge I get an experience that makes me feel totally alive and that is worth it! I don’t have to step off the ledge, but that also means I won’t get to have the ride! It reminds me of a Brené Brown quote that talks about the adventure of the wholehearted journey.“Choosing to live and love with our whole hearts is an act of defiance. You’re going to confuse, piss-off, and terrify lots of people-including yourself. One minute you’ll pray that the transformation ends, and the next minute you’ll pray that it never ends. You’ll also wonder how you can feel so brave and so afraid at the same time…brave, afraid, and totally alive!”-Brené BrownEven though we may be walking towards change of our own choosing or it is being thrust upon us, I think it’s important to remember, it is okay that we may not enjoy the walking up or the waiting. We may even want it to end quicker than is possible or to forget the whole thing. But it is also important to be awake to the parts of the journey that make us feel alive. And as I tell myself when I find myself grumbling about walking up to my next platform (whether it is a project I am working on or a change I am facing) ”You don’t have to like this part, but remember when you step off the ledge, don’t forget to enjoy the ride!”last_img read more

Improving Footage with the Warp Stabilizer in Premiere Pro

first_imgGot shaky footage?  The Warp Stabilizer in Premiere Pro can save the day when dealing with shaky handheld video.  In this post we show you how.Editors are constantly faced with fixing production issues during the video editing process, with shaky footage being one of the main troubleshooting points.  The proliferation of smaller handheld and POV cams (GoPro for instance) means that many shots need extra care in post production to make them smooth.  Before the Warp Stabilizer was introduced in Premiere Pro CS, your options for smoothing shaky shots was to use After Effects, the Smoothcam tool in Final Cut Pro or a third party effect like CoreMelt’s popular Lock and Load plugin.Warp Stabilizer is Adobe Premiere’s take on stabilizing footage.  The Warp Stabilizer tool allows you to quickly stabilize shaky footage without having to jump to another application or use a third party plugin.  In this post we’ll take a look at how to use Premiere Pro’s Warp Stabilizer tool to successfully improve the footage in your shots.Applying the Premiere Pro Warp StabilizerPremiere Pro’s Warp Stabilizer can be used to either smooth movement or remove movement from your video shots.  In the Effects Panel type “warp” to see the effect, then apply it to a clip in your video editing sequence (drag onto clip or double click the effect with the clip selected.As a side note: In this example you’ll see that the icon for “Accelerated Effects” appears in the Effects tab.  I have a supported Nvidia Quadro 4000 card so I get GPU acceleration for supported effects.  You can see a list of supported cards here.  For more info on accelerated effects in Premiere Pro check out this Lynda.com video:Now on to Warp Stabilization in Premiere Pro!  When you apply the Warp Stabilizer to a clip it runs the Analysis in the background so you can still edit in Premiere Pro while it works.By Default the Warp Stabilizer uses Smooth Motion, which works when you want to keep some camera movement in your shot but smooth it out.  Use “Smooth Motion” when you want to smooth the bumps in a handheld tilt/pan movement.  Use “Remove Motion” when you were trying to not move the camera for a “shot on a tripod” look.  Generally the smoothness settings are a little low for me.  I generally start at 100-150%In my example I want the shot to look like it was filmed with a tripod, so  I change the result to “No Motion”.  If the Warp Stabilizer’s Auto-scale is below 110-115% the footage quality isn’t noticeably degraded.For challenging footage where there is significant camera movement, you can get better results by checking “Detailed Analysis” (it just takes a bit longer to run this analysis). For DSLR’s you can decrease the “Jello effect” (wobble, skew, smear) by choosing “Enhanced Reduction” under Rolling Shutter Ripple.Another option when using Premiere Pro is to only use the Rolling Shutter Repair effect if you’re just needing to fix the “Jello effect” of cameras using a CMOS sensor.Want more specifics on using Premiere Pro’s Warp Stabilizer and Rolling Shutter Repair effects?  Check out these articles from the Adobe help database.Got video editing tips to share for reducing camera movement?Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more

Roundup: The Most Exciting Camera Rumors of 2018

first_imgARRIWith ARRI’s recent release of the ARRI LF, along with their panel of 16 brand-new Signature Prime Lenses, they retain their standing in the professional-grade market. ARRI may have just released the new LF, but there are still rumblings that they have something else up their sleeves. Rumors suggest we may see a new 6K Alexa sensor at the end of 2018 or early 2019.RED CamerasRED Cameras has a reputation for releasing exciting, state-of-the-art cameras for professional cinematographers. Recently, they created a RED Dragon hybrid camera called the Xenomorph for David Fincher’s crew to use on Netflix’s crime-drama Mindhunter.The one thing that has people talking when it comes to RED this year is their new cell phone, the RED HYDROGEN.This is the phone that you might see in the pocket of your favorite cinematographer, and it is slated to come out this year. It’s rumored to control RED cameras wirelessly and display shots in real time — must-haves for RED junkies around the world.*UPDATE*There are rumors that RED Camera and Foxconn are cultivating a partnership to create RED’s first prosumer camera that shoots in 8K. Foxconn is a company that manufactures iPhones, as well as assembles ASIC / front-end LSI circuits for RED cinema cameras. The price speculation is around $2,000. Here’s a closer look from an article by Nikkei:“We will make cameras that will shoot professional-quality films in 8K resolution but at only a third of current prices and a third of current camera sizes,” Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou told reporters in Taipei following the company’s annual employee party before the Chinese New Year. 8K ultra-high definition resolution has become the benchmark standard for digital television and cinematography.Gou said he is in talks with RED Digital Cinema, whose cameras are used in the filming of such hit films and TV shows as Transformers and Netflix’s House of Cards, to form a joint venture or partnership to produce affordable cameras. A RED’s 8K camera now sells for around $30,000.An affordable RED prosumer camera would certainly make big waves in the mid-priced camera market. With RED’s status in the cinema camera world, a step into this new market could ascend them into becoming one of the top players in the industry. SonySony seems to have the market on lockdown with its line of consumer- and professional-grade cameras, but to stay on top, Sony is going to have to release some high-octane additions to their current lineup. After the release of the highly praised A7R III, the future looks bright for Sony — as long as they stay on track.Sony A7S IIIThe Sony A7S II is a staple of modern cinematography — it’s the most rented mirrorless camera of 2017. It hit the market almost three years ago, so it’s about due for an upgrade. Here’s what we think the A7S III is going to offer:Same 24-megapixel sensor as the Alpha A9.Full-frame 6K sensor readout.Same A9 PDAF.4:2:2 internal 10-bit.4K video at 60fps.S-LOG and picture profiles.Price below $3,000.Advanced AF system.(Via Mirrorless Times.)Sony A7 IIINew 24MP full-frame sensor.The same Sony A9 autofocus system without the 20fps frame rate.3.0″ tilting LCD touchscreen.4K video recording.Joystick control.6-7 fps shooting.Improved AF (speed, accuracy, frame coverage, settings).BSI sensor.AA filter or global shutter in silent mode.Faster EVF.Better weather sealing.Dual SD slots like Sony A9.Price around $2000.Built-in Wi-Fi/Bluetooth.To be announced in 2018.(Via Sony Camera Rumors.)Sony Lens RumorsSony 135mm F1.8 FE.Sony 20mm f/2.8 FE.Sony 200-600mm lens.Zeiss Batis and Loxia.Sigma 35mm f/1.4 FE other FE lenses.Voigtlander FE.Tokina FE.Samyang FE.(Via Daily Camera News.)PanasonicGH5sImage via Panasonic.This one’s not a rumor anymore: Panasonic announced the GH5s at CES this year. Here are the final specs:10.2MP multi-aspect sensor.4:3, 17:9, 16:9, and 3:2 aspect ratios.4K 60/50p recording in Cinema 4K (4,096 x 2,160).Max ISO 51,200 ceiling.Internal 4:2:2 10-bit recording with pre-installed V-Log.Dual Native ISO Technology.The 225-area AF arrangement and light levels as low as -5EV. It’s time for this year’s juicy camera conjecture. Here, we present your officially unofficial 2018 camera rumor roundup.Every year, expectations run high for new camera releases, and this year is no different. As we’ve done in years past (2017, 2016), we’ve rounded up the latest camera rumors of the past few months.Last year, we saw the Canon C100 Mark III turn into the C200. We also saw the Sony a7R III and Panasonic GH5. There were even a few surprises, like the URSA Mini Pro and Sony CineAlta VENICE. So what does 2018 have in store? We don’t know, but here are the rumors (no promises).CanonGiven Canon’s lackluster releases last year, and companies such as Sony and Panasonic hot on their heels, Canon is really going to have to make an impression this year. Hopefully, they realize that nobody wants a mirrored camera anymore. Full-frame mirrorless is the wave of the future, and Canon is going to have to acknowledge that someday. Here are the cameras that we think can keep them on top of the industry.Canon 6K C500 Mark IIImage via Canon.This is the biggest rumor I’ve heard about a Canon camera in some time, and it’s likely the most exciting for our audience. According to Canon Rumors, the new 6K Canon C500 Mark II (originally rumored to be the C900) camera will be the company’s rival to the Sony VENICE. There are also some rumblings that we may see some Canon anamorphic glass at NAB 2018.Canon C500 Mark II rumored specs:New full-frame 6K sensor.EF and PL mounts (B4 Mount with Adapter).15+ stops of dynamic range.Internal 6K up to 60 fps, 4K up to 120 fps.Raw recording, XF-AVC, and ProRes.Selectable gamma and LOG curves.Canon Log, Canon Log 2, and Canon Log 3.Announcement — Late 2018.Canon C100 Mark III / Canon C300 Mark IIIWe’ve heard multiple reports of a new Cinema EOS at NAB. Don’t expect it to be the 6K C500, which seems to still be in development. That said, we could finally see a long-awaited update to the C100 line — or even a new C300.Rumored Canon C300 Mark III specs:6K Super35 sensor.Highest dynamic range of any Canon Cinema camera.180fps @ 2K.60fps @ 4K.Internal RAW.Pricing higher than C300 Mark II at launch.(Via Canon Rumors.)Rumored C100 Mark III specs:4K video recording up to 60fps.1080p up to 120fps.Super 35mm CMOS sensor.PL + EF Mount.ISO 100-102,400.CFast + SD card slots.XF-AVC/MPEG-4 AVC/H.264/ProRes.RAW capture with external recorder.New anamorphic lens announced alongside its release.To be announced in April (ahead of NAB).(Via Rumors Dot Camera/Canon Watch /Additional Sources.)Canon Full-Frame Mirrorless CameraCanon has promised a huge announcement: a new Cinema EOS camera. If they want to compete with Sony’s A7R III, they need to release a full-frame mirrorless camera with an EF mount. Here’s what we think they might be brewing up at Canon Labs:Full-frame mirrorless camera.4K video recording.EF mount.New prime lens.LOG capture.5DS R Mark IIThe 5D sister cameras are expected to show up in the latter half of 2018, most likely at the Photokina Conference later this year. Possible specs:Working prototypes are currently being tested.The “5DS” series will become a single camera.No low pass filter.All new 60.1mp image sensor.A new type of low megapixel mode.4K video (video is not a big part of the camera’s design).Identical body to the EOS 5D Mark IV.Focus-peaking present; may appear first on another DSLR.Expect all the other features such as DPAF, Wi-Fi, touchscreen, and GPS.(Via CanonRumors.)Rumored 7D Mark III Specs:1. Better AF tracking. Canon’s iTR technology has lagged behind competitors the past few years, and a 7D III needs to significantly improve in this area to remain competitive. Our ideal situation: the same AF system as 1DX Mark II, giving wide-frame coverage, like the Nikon D500.2. Improved video. The 7D II‘s video was only a marginal improvement over the original 7D, which was several years older. A 7D III is almost guaranteed to have 4K video.3. Improved base ISO raw dynamic range. Given that most Canon cameras introduced since the 7D II have offered improved Raw dynamic range, we think it’s pretty likely to be part of a 7D III.4. Touchscreen. The 7D II added dual-pixel AF, which was a really significant addition, especially for video, but it was hobbled by the fact that you had to use hardware controls for doing things like initiating subject tracking. Given that most newer Canons do this as well, it’s pretty likely to be included in a hypothetical 7D III.5. AF Auto Fine Tuning for Canon lenses with the ability to save multiple focal length adjustment values.6. Built-in WiFi. There’s no excuse not to have wireless connectivity built-in in 2018. Bluetooth and NFC would be the cherry on top.(via CanonRumors.)*UPDATE*CanonRumors.com has just confirmed that the upcoming Canon mirrorless camera, the EOS M50, will be arriving with 4K capabilities. Here’s the information we have so far:We reported last month that the next mirrorless from Canon would shoot 4K video and it looks like we’ve confirmed that it will.This would make the EOS M50 the first APS-C shooter in the Canon lineup to shoot 4K and adds a bit of credence to that special invite from one of Canon’s subsidiaries we were told about last monthThe EOS M50 will remain an EF-M mount camera. Unfortunately, we have no other specifications at this time.You can read more on CanonRumors.com. FujifilmFujifilm is a relatively new player in the mirrorless market, and with the success of the X-T2 a few years back, they seem to be making a steady run at the big dogs in the camera-sphere. We’ve heard that their supposed new camera, the X-H1, is going to take aim at the Panasonic Gh5’s consumer- and mid-level market share. Here are the rumored specs:Fujifilm X-H1Announcement February 14, 2018.Fujifilm X-H1 Faster Autofocus Than Fujifilm X-T2.X-H1 will have IBIS and it will be 5 Axis In Body Stabilization.IBIS will work with all Fujinon X-mount lenses.IBIS Full sensor readout.IBIS and OIS currently do not work together.No sensor shift multishot.There will be design changes over the X-T2, such as a better hand grip.First Sketches of X-H1 – Front + Back + Top side Sketches.The X-H1 will have the 24MP megapixel X-Trans III sensor.Release first half of 2018 – shipping in February.Will cost around $2,000.New Film simulation Eterna coming with X-H1.No Exp.Comp dial but top LCD screen like GFX.X-Processor Pro of Fujifilm X-T2 & Co.Fujifilm X-H1 same battery of X-T2, the NP-W126S.Fujifilm X-H1 same 3-way tilt screen of X-T2 + touch function.Video Specs: 4K, 1.17x crop, 30p, 4:2:0 8 bit 200 Mbps.Internal F-Log.Headphone jack in body.“4K Photo” feature is a timelapse feature.EVF with 30%+ higher resolution than X-T2.Much shorter EVF black out than X-T2, basically blackout free.(Specs via Fuji Rumors.)Blackmagic DesignIt’s another year of silence from Blackmagic on successors to their Pocket Cinema or Cinema camera lines. One can dream, and if our dreams did come true, here’s what we would want from those cameras:Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera II4K up to 30fps.UltraHD Apple ProRes up 30fps.1080 up to 60fps.15+ Stops.Blackmagic Cinema Camera II4K up to 60-120fps.Apple Pro-Res up to 60fps.1080 up to 120fps.Detachable LCD screen. Looking for more info on video gear? Check out these articles.The Comprehensive Guide To Building Your Own Video Editing PCA Look at the ARRI/Zeiss Master and Ultra Prime LensesYou Can Build a 4k Cinema Camera for Under $1,500Should You Use Vintage Lenses on Your Next Project?CES 2018: DJI Releases New Gear Lineup, Including a $99 Dronelast_img read more

Lies of Omission

first_imgMost salespeople are honest and ethical. But it’s not so much because the balance of power between buyer and seller has changed as it pertains to who has information. And it’s not because the Internet allows buyers to turn the tables on sellers and sales organization, although that probably plays some small part.The reason that most salespeople are honest is because it’s the most effective way to sell. It doesn’t help you to lie or mislead your client to win their business if by doing so you lose their future business forever. It doesn’t pay to destroy your relationships and reputation. This is why salespeople have to believe in what they sell; if they don’t believe in what they sell, they won’t sell it. They’d rather suffer through the pain of missing their number than to destroy their important client relationships.Great ExpectationsThere is one area where a lot of salespeople could use some improving: managing expectations.It’s not that salespeople overtly lie to their clients or mislead them. Instead, they allow their prospective client to believe something that isn’t true without correcting it.The words you use lead buyer to a certain set of beliefs. They believe you are going to help them produce better results (and you are). They believe that those results are going to require a certain investment (and it is). And they believe it’s going to take a certain amount of time and a certain level of commitment from your client and their team (it will).You can’t allow your dream client to believe the results are going to be better than they are. You also can’t allow them to believe that those results are going to be produced faster than is really possible either. If they have built up those beliefs in their mind, you are obligated to change those beliefs, lest you destroy their trust.You can’t allow your dream client to believe the cost is going to be less than what it truly will be either. This is another trust-destroyer.And the last one, the level of commitment required of your client and their team, is my favorite. Some salespeople mistakenly believe that they’ll lose their opportunity if they suggest how difficult it will really be for the client to get the results they need. They would rather risk allowing their dream client to believe that no real effort will be required and deal with the repercussions later.It Will Set You FreeYour clients are grown ups. They can handle the truth. In fact, nothing builds your trust and credibility more than openly discussing the real challenges in producing the results they need. This is what earns you the right to join their management team. If you want trusted advisor status, it’s found in all of the difficult conversations about challenging issues.The fast track to being something far less than trusted advisor is found in allowing your client to believe something that isn’t true. It’s not a lie of commission. But it is a lie of omission. Your client will treat both lies the same.QuestionsHow do you manage your client’s expectations?What do you notice that leads you to believe they are building up your solution too much?How do you nudge them back to the truth without risking your opportunity?Why do your clients want to believe they can have the results for a lower price, with less work, and faster?last_img read more

The Leadership Playbook: Leaders Teach Values

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now My friend, Howard Bloom, tells a story about Japanese macaques (monkeys). He says that “an innovative leader can spread new practices through the group in hours. But a conservative monkey leader, a dictatorial defender of the traditions he’s inherited or created, can force the group reject opportunities that glitter with potential.”Howard continues, “In Takasakiyama, Japan, another macaque leader, Jupiter, laid down a cultural pattern that encouraged bullying, beating, and humiliating females. But when Jupiter grew old and died, the new leader–Titan–abolished this extreme emphasis on anti-female aggression. He also shifter the times, destinations, and other ways of wandering–the ‘pattern of nomadism’–of the group and even change the time of day the group ate.”This story is interesting–and safer–when it’s a story about monkeys. But experts in organizational culture don’t see human behavior as any different.ValuesLeaders teach values.If the leader believes that integrity and honesty is the foundation of the organization, the agreements they make with their external and internal stakeholders, that is what the organization will value–as long as the leader leads by example and protects the culture.But the opposite is also true. If the leader doesn’t believe that integrity is fundamental, neither will those he leads. He teaches by his example.If the leader believes in respecting the individual, treating people with care and compassion, even under the most trying circumstances, that is how the organization will treat people. But this value will only be true if it is practiced inside the organization.People who aren’t treated with respect, care, and compassion won’t treat others that way. They’ll live the value as it is practiced inside.TeacherIt’s the leaders job to create and protect the culture, and the culture is, in part, made up of a collection of values, beliefs, and behaviors.You’re people will be what you are, not what you profess to be. You cast a long shadow. It’s your job to teach values, by your actions, your deeds, and your words. It’s also your job to teach by rooting out beliefs, behaviors, and actions that go against the values you teach.last_img read more

My Top 10 Principles for Winning at B2B Sales

first_imgThe following list of principles is a short guide as to how you might think about B2B sales now. The list and the principles are both prescriptive, suggesting you do something, that you take action. The principles leave room for you to make different choices instead of limiting the actions you might take in pursuit of following these laws. There are a few links here to posts and books I have written that might provide additional guidance, should you need it. Be other-oriented: The more you focus on serving your client, the easier you make selling. If you are self-oriented, you create resistance to buying from you because your motivations betray the fact that the deal is about you. Create value in every interaction: Your client has to believe they benefitted from giving you their time. If you wasted their time, you are less likely to obtain another meeting. You want to be so good that your client would pay you for your time. Control the process: When you are prospecting, you sell a meeting. In a meeting, you sell the process. (Read this post) Many of the common challenges in sales stem from losing control of the process. Try never to leave a meeting without another meeting. If you want additional help here, pick up The Lost Art of Closing. No more pushy sales tactics. The Lost Art of Closing shows you how to proactively lead your customer and close your sales. Enter from the right: In Eat Their Lunch, I shared the idea of Level 4 Value Creation, the level of value your client would perceive as strategic. Start conversations with strategic outcomes and work backward to your solution. Win customers away from your competition. Check out Eat Their LunchEstablish your credibility through demonstration: You prove you belong in the room by demonstrating you have the business acumen, the situational knowledge, and the intangibles. Your company, your time in the business, and your won logos mean less than ever. Sell strategic outcomes: It’s easier to sell strategic outcomes than products or services, especially in the commoditized markets we find ourselves in now. The “dissatisfaction” that might have given rise to change in the past isn’t likely enough now. You have to increase the importance by focusing on more significant, more systemic problems. (Read this post from last week)Focus on decision-makers: Most of the time, you will find your clients making decisions as a group, seeking consensus. Instead of looking for “the” decision-maker, you are looking for the “decision-makers” (plural). The fewer stakeholders actively participating in the sales conversation, the less likely you are to win a deal. Engage in difficult conversations: You have to effectively deal with and dispatch the obstacles to change, even when it is uncomfortable, and even when others would prefer to avoid difficult conversations. You cannot be consultative or a trusted advisor if you are afraid to deal with challenges. Ignoring real issues is a lie of omission. Help manage change: In The Only Sales Guide, I included a chapter about managing change. That is what we do in sales, we recommend change, we sell change, and then we are accountable for making sure the transition is executed. Learn Anthony’s core strategies & tactics for sales success at any level with The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever NeedContinue to nurture and capture mindshare: Treat the first initiative with a new client as the starting point of the next initiative, a launchpad for even greater value creation. You start creating the next opportunity as soon as you stand up the first solution. (More on capturing mindshare in Eat Their Lunch)Executing these principles requires serious effort. If you would be consultative, a professional in your craft, doing the work necessary to adhere to these principles will provide you with a path to becoming just that. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

File FIR in Goa priest’s death: HC

first_imgPanaji: The Bombay High Court at Goa on Tuesday directed the Goa Police Crime Branch to file an FIR in connection with the mysterious death of Father Bismarque Dias, a Catholic priest and social worker, and submit a status report of the investigation every three months.Fr. Dias, who was protesting against alleged illegal real estate development near his village, St. Estevam in North Goa, was found dead in a water body near Mandovi river in November 2015.Activists and Opposition parties suspected that the priest could have been murdered for opposing illegal real estate in his village. The police, however, after conducting a preliminary inquiry, had claimed that he drowned while swimming. Activist Sudeep Dalvi and family members of Fr. Dias, who have been campaigning for a formal investigation, said the HC’s direction proves there is substance in their contention that his death was suspicious.last_img read more

Panjab University senators back students

first_imgAhead of the special senate meeting, slated for May 7 to discuss Panjab University’s (PU) financial crisis, senators have come in support of students and asked the Vice-Chancellor (VC) to roll back the fee hike and drop the cases against students. In a letter written to VC Arun Kumar Grover, as many as nine senators have expressed concern about the students’ future, saying that the fee hike and registration of police cases against students adds to their stress levels at a time when they should be focused on their studies.The students have been protesting against the significant hike in tuition fee announced by the PU last month for the 2017-18 academic year. On April 11, the campus witnessed a violent clash between students and police amid a protest against the fee hike. The university administration had justified the average 12.5% hike citing its deficit of ₹ 244 crore for the financial year 2017-18.last_img read more

‘Employer Led Model has reduced HIV stigma’

first_imgThe Employer Led Model (ELM) HIV/AIDS prevention-to-care programme has helped reduce the stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV said Asha Vernekar, ELM Programme Officer, Goa AIDS Control Society, on Sunday.She was speaking on Strategies for Prevention and Control of HIV/ AIDS under National AIDS Control Programme at the MOG Sundays, a public talk series at the Museum of Goa. She said the corporate social responsibility-led initiative has helped mitigate the risk of HIV/AIDS among migrant labourers employed in formal and informal sectors.The ELM programme is implemented in partnership with Mormugao Port Trust and corporates like Sesa Sterlite and Zuari Agrochemicals. Ms. Vernekar said, “This partnership model is part of the multi-sectoral approach and helps integrating HIV counselling and testing within existing health infrastructure and adds to the participation of the employer in well-being of the workers.”last_img read more

Amarinder going soft on graft: Khaira

first_imgLeader of the Opposition in the Punjab Assembly Sukhpal Singh Khaira has accused Punjab Chief Minister Captain Amarinder Singh of going soft on corruption.Sand mining issueMr. Khaira claimed that 40 days after submission of the report by the Narang Commission, set-up to look into allegations of corruption into sand mining, action is yet to be taken as per the panel’s directions.Two weeksThe Leader of Opposition said the Commission had submitted it’s report to Captain Singh on August 10 and suggested that action be taken on the report within two weeks.“Instead of taking action on the report, the government is making an attempt to push it under the rug,” adding that the Congress government should tell the people about the findings of the Narang Commission and also must make it public, said Mr. Khaira.RTI ActThe Leader of the Opposition alleged that he applied to seek information regarding the findings of Justice Narang commission, under Right to Information (RTI) Act from the office of chief secretary of Punjab on August 14 but no information has been served till date.‘Mockery of law’“As per the RTI Act guidelines, the information asked has to be given within the time span of 30 days from the date of applying. Capt Amarinder Singh and his officers are making a mockery of law just to save corrupt minister,” added the Leader of the Opposition.last_img read more

Seat-sharing will be done soon after receipt of BJP’s proposal, says Nitish Kumar

first_imgBihar Chief Minister and Janata Dal (United) president Nitish Kumar on Monday said his party’s seat-sharing with the BJP would be done soon after a proposal on this came from that party in three-four weeks.“But, nothing has been done on it now…there will be one-to-one talk with the BJP on this issue”, he told journalists on the sidelines of his weekly Lok Samvad (people’s interaction) programme in Patna.Party insiders told The Hindu  that the JD(U) would get at least 12 out of the total 40 parliamentary seats in the State in the seat-sharing formulae with the BJP.RLSP’s standOn Sunday, Upendra Kushwaha, chief of another alliance partner of the BJP, the Rashtriya Lok Samata Party (RLSP), said that “unless all alliance party leaders sit together, seat-sharing among the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) constituents will not be done”.The RLSP, said NDA insiders, was likely to get two seats now. In the 2014 general election, the party won all the three seats it got. However one of its party MPs from Jehanabad, Arun Kumar, later rebelled against Mr. Kushwaha and is likely to be accommodated in the BJP quota of seats this time.Special status for BiharMr. Kumar said the special status grant for Bihar had been an old demand and “Bihar must be accorded special status as it is a land-locked State”.“We will raise this demand again at [sic] the all-party meeting”, he said. “Earlier too, we had sought time from former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for this but he had not given us time.We’ve come to know that all parties of Bihar have given their consent for the demand of special status grant to Bihar”, he said.last_img read more

Pune, Nashik in grip of swine flu

first_imgVolatile temperatures have led to a surge in swine flu-related deaths across northern and western Maharashtra, with more than 60 people succumbing to the lethal H1N1 virus in the State since July this year, confirmed health officials on Wednesday.Maximum in PuneMost of the fatalities were recorded in the last two months, with maximum casualties originating from Pune district in western Maharashtra (30 deaths) and Nashik in northern Maharashtra (23 deaths).According to alarming reports from Nashik, at least three deaths were reported from the district in the last 24 hours, taking the toll since mid-July to 23.“There has been a spurt in the number of those afflicted by the virus since July. More than 600 persons across the State have tested positive while more than 19,000 persons exhibiting H1N1influenza-like symptoms have been administered with Tamiflu,” said State surveillance officer Pradeep Awate.Medical authorities in Nashik informed that a total of 53 patients were presently admitted in the civil district hospital and in private clinics in the district.Pune city and the township of Pimpri-Chinchwad, which witnessed a month-long spell of relentless showers in August, recorded 10 and 20 cases of persons succumbing to the virus.Dip in temperaturesSince the beginning of this month, the city has been experiencing a sharp difference between day and night temperatures which has proved conducive for the virus.“There has been a spurt in swine flu cases especially since the beginning of August owing to prolonged wet conditions. At least 10 deaths have been confirmed due to the virus with a total of 175 cases testing positive for H1N1. Around 35 people had been put ventilation,” said Dr. Anjali Sabne, assistant medical officer, Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC).Pimpri-Chinchwad health authorities informed that 150 cases had tested positive for the virus since the beginning of this year, with most of the cases being recorded in the past couple of months.The State witnessed a serious recrudescence of the H1N1 virus in 2015 as well owing to parts of Maharashtra receiving fresh showers occasioned by intense humidity, with the total death toll exceeding 800, along with a staggering 8,240 cases being recorded that year.One reason for the high mortality rate in 2015 was the fact that many H1N1 cases were recorded even during summer that year, with several bouts of unseasonal showers negating the impact that high summer temperatures may have otherwise had in curbing the spread of the virus.last_img read more

Leopard in Gujarat court causes panic

first_imgA sub-adult leopard took shelter in a court building in Chotila town of Gujarat’s Surendranagar district on Friday, causing panic.The animal was first spotted in an abandoned house next to the magistrate’s court, following which locals alerted forest officials, said Deputy Conservator of Forest G.A. Zala. “When we tried to catch the leopard, it entered the court premises. It then jumped into a room through the window,” he said. “Ten staff were in the room, but they made a quick exit and bolted the door from outside. Then we learnt that two more were still inside. Luckily, they could lock themselves up in a chamber inside the room,” said the officer. The forest officials rescued them by breaking the window of the chamber. “We then entered the room and caught the leopard using a tranquilliser gun,” he said.last_img read more

BJD to send 33% women to Lok Sabha, says Naveen Patnaik

first_imgBHUBANESWAR – Without waiting for the women’s reservation bill to be passed in Parliament, Odisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Sunday announced that Biju Janata Dal would field 33% women candidates in the forthcoming Lok Sabha elections.“Odisha will send 33% women to Parliament in the coming election,” said Mr. Patnaik addressing ‘Mission Shakti’ convention at coastal Kendrapara district which he termed ‘Karma Bhoomi’ of his legendary father late Biju Patnaik.‘Mission Shakti’ was launched by Odisha government as a campaign for holistic empowerment of women by forming women’s self-help groups.“The women of Odisha will lead the way in women empowerment in India. If India is to lead the world, if India has to compete with countries like America and China and become advanced, then women empowerment is the only answer,” said Odisha CM.“In 1990s, former CM late Biju Patnaik had shown the way to entire nation. It was he who for the first time in India had implemented 33% reservation for women in the three-tier panchayati raj institutions and government jobs,” said Mr. Patnaik.He went on: “in 2012, the BJD-led government enhanced it to 50% in PRIs. Taking the move forward, last year, the State government passed a resolution in Odisha State Legislative Assembly to provide 33% reservation to women in both Parliament and State Legislatures.”“I have also sent a proposal to all the national parties and chief ministers in this regard. I call upon all the national parties that they should be true to their words, and must follow what they are propagating for women empowerment,” Mr. Patnaik said.last_img read more

Indian Parliament Comes Down Hard on Cervical Cancer Trial

first_imgNEW DELHI—In another sharp blow for researchers hoping to conduct clinical trials in India, a parliamentary panel has excoriated a U.S. nonprofit and its Indian partner for alleged ethical violations in a trial of a vaccine to protect against cervical cancer caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The panel’s report “will have a freezing effect on all clinical research,” predicts epidemiologist Ramanan Laxminarayan, vice president for research at the Public Health Foundation of India in New Delhi.HPV infection is a leading cause of cervical cancer; each year, nearly 73,000 women in India die from the disease—about one-quarter of the global disease burden. A vaccine against the virus has been available in the United States since 2006. Hoping to broaden the vaccine’s use in the developing world, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH), a nonprofit based in Seattle, in 2009 launched a $3.6 million HPV trial, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in 24,777 adolescent girls in Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat states. PATH conducted what it calls similar “post licensure demonstration projects” in Uganda, Peru, and Vietnam. But several months into the Indian trial, the government pulled the plug after news outlets reported the deaths of seven girls.State investigations absolved the trial’s managers—PATH and the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in New Delhi—of responsibility in the deaths. Five were evidently unrelated to the vaccine: One girl drowned in a quarry; another died from a snake bite; two committed suicide by ingesting pesticides; and one died from complications of malaria. The causes of death for the other two girls were less certain: one possibly from pyrexia, or high fever, and a second from a suspected cerebral hemorrhage. Government investigators concluded that pyrexia was “very unlikely” to be related to the vaccine, and likewise they considered a link between stroke and the vaccine as “unlikely.” ICMR’s director general, microbiologist Vishwa Mohan Katoch, categorically rejects a connection: “Based on the enquiry, it is certain that causality of the seven deaths was not at all related to the HPV vaccine,” he insists. Other experts say that in the absence of autopsies, it is impossible to pinpoint the actual cause of death.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Probing deeper, a panel appointed by the Indian health ministry in 2010 uncovered a number of shortcomings and alleged ethical lapses in the vaccine trial. Its report in 2011 noted that the trial on several occasions failed to obtain proper informed consent of participants. It also revealed that trial managers did not set up a mechanism for reporting any adverse effects, and it criticized the lack of a control group and the trial’s inclusion of girls from India’s protected tribal communities without gaining individual consent. “The HPV trial was not handled well. The trial did not comply and meet the standards of good clinical practice,” says Maharaj Kishan Bhan, an immunologist who led a large clinical trial on a rotavirus vaccine approved earlier this year in which PATH was also a partner.Now, an all-party parliamentary panel has come down even more harshly on PATH—and on ICMR and the Drugs Controller General of India as well. Its 30 August report blasts PATH and ICMR for failing to have conducted postmortem examinations of the girls who died during the trial. And it levels an astonishing allegation: Rather than endeavoring to protect women’s health, PATH, it charged, was a willing tool of foreign drug companies hoping to convince the Indian government to include the HPV vaccine in its universal vaccine program, a roster of mandatory immunizations that the government is required to pay for. (HPV vaccine continues to be available in the Indian private sector.) ICMR, the panel’s report asserts, has “completely failed to perform [its] mandated role and responsibility as the apex body for medical research in the country. … Rather, in [its] over-enthusiasm to act as a willing facilitator of the machinations of PATH, [it has] even transgressed into the domain of other agencies which deserves the strongest condemnation and strictest action against [it].”Some commentators see merit in that argument. The three-dose HPV series costs approximately $150 in India. The fact that Merck, which makes Gardasil, and GlaxoSmithKline, maker of Cervarix, donated almost $6 million worth of their vaccines to the PATH trial “was not philanthropy,” asserts Chandra M. Gulhati, editor of the Monthly Index of Medical Specialities, an influential journal in India. “It is shocking to see how an American organization used surreptitious methods to establish itself in India,” he charges. “This is an obvious case where Indians were being used as guinea pigs,” contends Samiran Nundy, a gastrointestinal expert at the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital in New Delhi and editor emeritus of the National Medical Journal of India.In a statement, PATH said that “we strongly disagree with the findings, conclusions, and tone of the released report and its disregard of the evidence and facts.” Contacted by ScienceInsider, Vivien Davis Tsu, director of the Cervical Cancer Prevention Project at PATH, did not comment on the report’s allegations. “We remain committed to our legacy of ethical, evidence-based work on transformative innovations that save lives,” she says. The Gates Foundation noted in a statement that the World Health Organization, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and the Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India all have recommended vaccination “as a proven and highly effective preventive measure for cervical cancer.”Katoch acknowledges lapses in trial management. “Our conduct in terms of monitoring the study could have been better,” he says. New clinical trial regulations now being drafted by Parliament will tighten procedures governing trials, he says. “India will come out stronger after this episode.”Still, the fallout from the parliamentary panel’s report could be severe. “After this episode, it will be harder to do clinical trials in India,” predicts geneticist Krishnaswamy VijayRaghavan, secretary of the Department of Biotechnology. Laxminarayan worries that researchers will give up on clinical trials in India rather than navigate a maze of complex regulations that he believes are bound to be introduced in the wake of the HPV trial. All eyes are now on the Supreme Court, which on 26 September will resume hearings on a case broadly looking at clinical trials in India. Biomedical scientists better brace for trouble: In July, the court’s two-judge bench observed that while foreign companies “are treating India as a heaven for clinical trials, it is proving hell for India.”last_img read more

The Evolution of Little Red Riding Hood

first_imgDoes Little Red Riding Hood survive her visit to grandmother’s house? It depends on where you grew up. In some European tellings, the child meets a gruesome end in the jaws of a wolf, but in others she escapes. And in other parts of the world, the victim is a goat rather than a girl, or the villain is a tiger rather than a wolf. Did all of these versions evolve from a single ancient tale? Or have parents around the world independently invented the obviously good idea of terrifying their offspring with tales of child-munching monsters before sleep? By applying a bit of evolutionary biology to the tale, a researcher says he now has an answer.In the most popular European version of Little Red Riding Hood, a wolf devours an old woman and then imitates her, wearing her clothes and getting into her bed just in time for the arrival of her granddaughter. The tension builds as the girl relays a series of observations to the wolf—“Grandmother, what big ears you have! … What big teeth you have!”—until the animal eats her.But if you grew up in the Middle East, you might have heard a story called The Wolf and the Kids. Instead of dressing up as a human grandmother, the wolf impersonates a nanny goat before eating her goat kids. Could that tale be the ancestor of Little Red Riding Hood?Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Jamie Tehrani heard multiple versions of the folktale as a child and became fascinated by this question. “My father is Iranian, my mother British, and I grew up in Dubai,” says Tehrani, now an anthropologist at the University of Durham in the United Kingdom. He learned that anthropologists have been trying to trace the origins of the story for nearly 2 centuries. According to one leading hypothesis, the tale originated in China and was brought to Europe along the Silk Road 600 to 800 years ago. But another hypothesis holds that folktales mutate and evolve so quickly that all of these stories emerged and evolved independently from each other; their similarities are due to chance and the universality of a world filled with wild animals and vulnerable children. With so many gaps in the story’s history, the trail has gone cold.The historical record of the Red Riding Hood-like folktales may be spotty, but researchers have amassed a large collection of the contemporary variations. Those data allowed Tehrani to use phylogenetic analysis, a statistical technique used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships between species. He started with 58 versions of the tale—all in English translation—from 33 different cultures around the world. Then, just as an evolutionary biologist compares physical traits between organisms to measure their similarity, he scored the differences between the stories using 72 plot points, such as who played the villain, what trick the villain used, and how the story ends. The output of the analysis is a family tree showing the most likely relationships. If the stories did indeed originate in China, then the Chinese version should sprout from the base of the tree, with all other stories emerging as branches off that trunk.But the evolutionary analysis of Little Red Riding Hood does not support a Chinese origin. Instead, the folktale seems to have emerged almost 2000 years ago somewhere between Europe and the Middle East, Tehrani reports today in PLOS ONE. China most likely adopted the tale from Europe, rather than the other way around. The African versions of the story probably evolved from the Middle Eastern tale, The Wolf and the Kids. And that story appears to be older than Little Red Riding Hood, although one version of the European tale has become far more popular due to its publication in book form 200 years ago by the Brothers Grimm.“This is an important innovation because despite centuries of scholarship there exist many unresolved questions about the … evolution for different folktale traditions,” says Robert Ross, a psychologist at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, who has studied the origins and transmission of folktales. Still, he says, “I have some concerns about whether or not the particular folktale dataset he has used is appropriate for phylogenetic analysis.” He notes, for example, that only about one-third of the stories that Tehrani included in his analysis are classified by folklore scholars as belonging to the Little Red Riding Hood tradition. For this reason Ross suggests that it is unclear whether or not all the stories included in the analysis have a genuine historical link. To confirm this new evolutionary tale, Ross wants to see if the same pattern holds when more versions of the story are included in the analysis.*Clarification, 14 November, 5:36 p.m.: An earlier version of the caption stated that Little Red Riding Hood’s origin was in the Middle East, but that is not known; the statistical analysis found that the oldest version known originated there.*Correction, 15 November, 11:40 a.m.: Ross clarified his view on the data’s shortcoming, and this version reflects this.last_img read more

Plants hitchhike on the wings of birds

first_imgBiologists have long puzzled over why certain mossy plants are found only in the Arctic and at the very tip of South America, but not in between. Now, a team of researchers has discovered that long-distance fliers like the American golden-plover (pictured), which migrate from their breeding grounds in the Arctic to South America, often harbor tiny parts of these spore-producing plants in their feathers. Birds are known to transport seeds internally and externally, but scientists had not linked them to the long-distance dispersal of microscopic plant spores, called diaspores. To do so, the researchers first collected down and contour feathers from 23 birds representing eight species that were nesting along two Arctic rivers. The scientists microscopically examined the washed and screened samples, revealing 23 plant fragments from mosses, liverworts, algae, and fungi—all believed able to grow into new plants, they report today in PeerJ. The plant bits had been attached to the feathers of seven birds from three species—semipalmated sandpipers, red phalaropes, and the golden-plovers. The birds likely picked up the fragments from the vegetation they used to line their nests, which are typically simple depressions they scrape in the ground. The diaspores, especially those of mosses, are known for their resilience and can likely survive the birds’ journey to South America, the scientists say. On arrival, the birds generally molt — and in the process, drop off their tiny cargo, too. The scientists think that a new population of mosses can be established from a single, successful bird-dispersal event, because many moss species can self-fertilize and grow as clones.last_img read more

Scripps ends merger talks with USC

first_imgThe marriage is off. Officials at the Scripps Research Institute announced yesterday that they’ve called off discussions with the University of Southern California (USC) on a possible merger. The two institutions began exploring the idea of partnering last month. But a bitter revolt from Scripps faculty seems to have scuttled the talks.“Representatives from The Scripps Research Institute’s Board of Trustees, administration and faculty are in the process of coming together to analyze and discuss the strategic future of Scripps, reviewing a broad range of thoughtful alternatives to choose the best path forward for the institution,” reads a statement from Scripps’s president, Michael Marletta, and the chair of its board of trustees, Richard Gephardt. “To facilitate the holistic nature of this review, the current nonbinding letter of intent on discussions about a broad partnership with the University of Southern California (USC) has been terminated by mutual consent of both parties. We appreciate USC’s spirit of collaboration and look forward to continuing joint research projects among our scientists.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The world’s largest private biomedical research institute, with campuses in San Diego, California, and Jupiter, Florida, Scripps has been forced to the altar because of financial troubles. It gets the lion’s share of its annual operating budget of $310 million from federal research grants, primarily from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). But the amount of NIH dollars Scripps brings in has dropped 12% between 2007 and 2013. Scripps has also failed to find successors to lucrative deals with pharmaceutical firms that have ended.USC, by contrast, has both deeper pockets and more diverse sources of income. In addition to undergraduate tuition and income from clinical services, USC is in the midst of a campaign to add $6 billion to its endowment.Media reports about the proposed merger suggested that USC was offering to pay $15 million over 40 years to absorb the 262-member Scripps faculty. But those researchers revolted. Ten department chairs and a dean sent a letter to Marletta and Gephardt saying the proposed terms of the deal were “not even close to what it would take to build faculty support.” Chemical & Engineering News reported yesterday that Scripps faculty members voted nearly unanimously to reject Marletta’s leadership, a message Scripps officials seem to have heard loud and clear.last_img read more

New open-access journal plans to pay peer reviewers

first_imgA new open-access scientific journal hopes that paying peer reviewers a little hard cash will help strengthen efforts to make research results freely available to the public.Collabra, an online journal to be formally introduced tomorrow at a conference in the United Kingdom, plans to break with the research community’s long-standing tradition of reviewing journal submissions for free by paying small sums to the reviewers and editors who decide what gets published. In a further twist, the journal will give the payees a choice of what to do with their money. They can keep the cash, donate it to a fund that helps cash-strapped scientists pay the journal’s $875 publication fee, or contribute it to their own institution’s open-access activities.“Collabra is not just about paying reviewers, but also about directing some of the value generated back into the research community,” says Neil Blair Christensen, director of digital business development at the University of California Press (UC Press), the journal’s publisher.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“Paying reviewers for editing papers has been a subject of discussion for quite some time, but it’s actually never been tried,” says Graham Steel, an open-access advocate and community manager at the ContentMine, a literature mining initiative.Most scientific journals rely on volunteer editors and peer reviewers to operate. But when it comes to business models, journals fall into two general camps: subscription journals, which charge readers and libraries to read content that is kept behind paywalls; and open-access journals, which charge authors an upfront fee to make their accepted papers immediately available to anyone with an Internet connection.The article processing charges (APCs) charged by open-access journals range from just a few hundred dollars to more than $3000. Collabra plans to charge $875, of which $250 will be placed into a “research community fund,” which will be used to pay reviewers and editors. Payments will be based on how much money the fund collects and on a point system, with editors and reviewers earning points based on their involvement in the publishing process. Senior editors will earn one point for each article that they handle, for instance, whereas handling editors and reviewers will be given three points per article. Periodically, journal leaders will write checks based on the total amount collected by the fund, divided by the number of points awarded. One point would be worth $25, for example, if the fund collected $10,000 and each of 40 submitted articles had two reviewers, one handling editor, and a senior editor, for a total of 400 points (10 points per article).Jon Tennant, an open-access advocate and a Ph.D. student at Imperial College London, likes the concept. “It recognises the work that editors and reviewers do, which to me are the most important parts of the postsubmission process, and usually goes completely unrewarded,” he says.The journal aims to pay reviewers and editors regardless of whether the articles are accepted or rejected. UC Press “considered adding a nonrefundable submission fee to contribute to rejection expenses,” Christensen says, but ultimately rejected that idea. The system also aims to eliminate any incentive to accept subpar papers simply to fill the payment fund. “We wanted to ensure that editors and reviewers generate value regardless of their decision to reject or accept,” Christensen says.He also expects many reviewers and editors will donate their checks back to the journal or other open-access efforts. “Our market research suggests that 50%-plus … may elect to pay forward,” he says. But Collabra isn’t counting on any donations to operate, he adds.The press will also watch closely to make sure the payment system isn’t unfair or abused. The payments will be “fairly low,” Christensen predicts. “It’s unlikely anyone will profit by reviewing papers … [or that] any editor would keep sending manuscripts to the same reviewer time and time again. Any reviewer generating subpar reviews, or exhibiting questionable motives for reviewing, is subject to the same editorial scrutiny as on any journal.”Collabra aims to publish papers from many different disciplines. Initially, it will focus on the life and biomedical sciences, ecology and environmental science, and the social and behavioral sciences. It ultimately aims to expand into biomedical science, the humanities, and computer and physical science.UC Press officials plan to unveil Collabra at the FORCE2015 Research Communications and e-Scholarship Conference in Oxford on 13 January. The journal aims to formally publish its first articles in March 2015.last_img read more